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There has to be a better way to water a half acre of new lawn than dragging around a sprinkler every 20 minutes.

I have one of those tractor lawn sprinklers but the plastic wheels would just dig a hole in dirt without grass.

Its really got me thinking of a sprinkler system for the new home. Anyone done their own system? Can you do it with PVC and somewhat on the cheap?
 

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Try watering twice that ! Been going down that road for the last couple years. I have 2.1 acres of turf but dont even attempt watering all of it.

If you have good pressure get a long range sprinkler. That helps a bunch.

If I was going to do my own sprinkler I think I would use PEX instead of PVC but don't have any real experience to base that on. We have a stream along the front of property and I think next year I will pull water from that.
 

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Why water a lawn ? :unknown: A dry lawn means less mowing. :thumbup1gif:
 

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Brian,

What do you have available for water? How's the pressure and supply? If your well (assuming you're not on city water) has an excellent flow rate / recovery rate, you could put in a sprinkler system.

The way the system was designed in my old house was something like this...

- You run a main supply "trunk" for the water with the low-voltage electrical along with it for the zone valves.
- Each Zone valve opens / closes a particular secondary run of pipe.
- The secondary pipe goes in serial from zone valve to sprinkler head to sprinkler head (valve, pipe, head, pipe, head, pipe, etc).
- Each head can water a certain amount of area and you figure out how to place them so everything eventually gets covered.
- Sprinkler control turns the zones on and off in series (one after the other).

I believe mine was done with a special plastic pipe specifically for sprinkler systems (poly pipe).
 

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Its not lawn yet, just planted seed and there is no rain in the forecast for the next 7 days.

Thanks burdick, I am going to try to learn about this stuff to see if its worth it to try it out or not.
 

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Brian, Just as a FYI I have used about 5 different brands of sprinklers in the last couple years in a couple different styles. I had issues with them not spinning and the little mechanisms that toggle them back and forth breaking.

The only sprinkler I got to work long term and work well was this one.

Sprinkler

You might not want to deal with spiking it in the ground so another mount method might work better for you.

I like the tripod concept but the ones you buy wouldn't work for me. They tip over and the spikes in the feet suck.

I need to build one out of pipe that is heavy duty. You get larger coverage up high and don't have to bend over when you need to move it.
 

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One thing you'll want to consider when choosing a system is the fact you are currently watering dirt and not grass. Low volumes of water over a longer period of time will be best so that the water soaks in and doesn't pool or run off.

My old system had Hunter pop-up Gear Driven Rotor sprinkler heads. These "sweep" back and forth and can be set for the area they cover pretty easily. When there's pressure in the water line, they pop up and go to work. When the zone shuts off, they drop back down into the ground and you can mow right over them.

They also happen to be [one of] the lowest volume output heads available, which is exactly what you need at this point. You make up for the low volume with longer watering times.

The control heads are also able to leverage a "rainfall" sensor to determine whether or not the system actually needs to turn on on any given day. Basically, it's a sponge mounted on a stick. You put it someplace where natural rainfall (and the sprinkler system, I believe) can get it wet. If it's "wet enough", the sponge will conduct electricity and close a contact, thus shutting down the system. But, if there has been no rain and the sponge is dry, no conduction, no closed contact, and the system runs and waters the lawn.
 

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Brian,
My backyard pictured has a sprinkler system I installed back in Feb 2010. Wasn't sure if I would get a good stand or not but planted this in July -August of 2009 and ran some tubing across the yard with a bunch of hose bibbs staked out. Then in late Feb when the ground thawed out I installed the sprinklers. Being in the plumbing business helped but anyone can do this as it is simple just lots of digging. I am using pvc sch40 pipe and Hunter PGP geardrive pop ups. Let me know if you are still interested in doing yours. Glad to help you out.


First two pics are right after I installed the system and the last picture was taken in late summer of 2010. Living in the mountains in a dry climate sprinklers are a must have. There are 22 sprinklers watering this area with 11 zones with 2 heads at a time.
 

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