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Hello, Great forum, first time on. First Green Trctor for this city guy.

Wondering about Fuel - the 1937 B - Can I run it on unleaded pump gas?

It has steel rear wheels with lugs- any type of cover or something to put over the lugs, as to not tear up driveway?
I just bought this to restore (nothing fancy) with my son, we will learn as we go.

Anything I need to watch out for on these?

Thanks in Advance...
 

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Welcome to GTT, I will learn right along with you. :thumbup1gif:
 

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Welcome! That sounds like an awesome project. My grandfather still has his dad's '36 B and it is remarkable how well built that old tractor is. 80 years old and it will still be working the garden this summer.

Fuel:
Old tractors were designed to start on what was then very expensive gasoline and be switched over to cheaper distillate fuels (such as kerosene) once they had warmed up. This is the reason for the big fuel tank and the little fuel tank. It is also why their engines ran at much lower compression ratios than modern equipment. You can still do this if you want the old time experience of working the tractor as they would have back in the day. However, if you don't want to keep a can of kerosene in the garage, modern unleaded will do just fine with a little bit of carb tuning. The valves and seats are so hard and the rpms are so low that you don't need leaded fuels. The compression is so low you don't need premium either. Ethanol on the other hand is something to avoid if at all possible. From my own experience I have learned that ethanol eats natural rubber such as can be found in most original pre-80's fuel systems. It also doesn't store very well either in cans or in the machine itself.

Steel wheels:
They are just as impractical as they are totally cool. I have seen old tractors with little rubber covers on their lugs but the way most people solve this dilemma is to bolt the tread of an old tractor tire to the existing rim. This at least makes them driveable on a day to day basis and allows you to switch the tractor back to factory spec if you want to. The third common solution is to get a pair of pneumatic wheels and simply switch the entire wheel as needed. Regardless of which option you choose, you have a depression era tractor on its original steel which survived the ww2 scrap drives... don't get rid of the original wheels! Even if you don't use them, paint them up nice so they stay protected and stash them away somewhere safe.

Other things:
Get a good set of manuals. Skip the cheat IT brand stuff from Tractor Supply and get genuine Deere books.
Have at least two comically large adjustable wrenches for taking apart some of the larger and more stubborn bolts.
On a similar note, a heating torch and copious amounts of PB Blaster help too.
Don't be afraid to make a mess or get the floor dirty.
Take pictures and label parts as they come off the tractor.
Change all lubricanting oils with quality modern oils and grease before you try to drive it around too much. For the engine, use a flat-tappet oil such as Shell Rotella or another diesel truck oil.

The most important thing is to have fun and enjoy it.

Also, :ttiwwp:
 

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Our local FS store sells non-ethanol 89 octane gas. Our Model A ran kind of poorly on that. Premium gas worked much better. There's not may places around here that sell lower octane non-ethanol gas.

Also JDParts.com likely has a PDF of parts you can download for free. Handy for seeing how assemblies go together and part #s.
 

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Welcome from northeastern Pennsylvania. There is a lot of restoration information in Green Magazine and Two-Cylinder Magazine also. I agree with Evergreen - you have a real special tractor and piece of history. If only they could talk.
 

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:wgtt:
 

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welcome to gtt from pa. I have the newer version of ur B. mine is the jd model 50. good luck with ur restore job. and----

:wgtt:
 
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