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Hello,

Just joined this group and have been reading some of the posts. Getting ready to pull the trigger on a 1025R TLB with MMM and a box blade. I'm just not sure if the backhoe will do some of the work I have planned. We have a few hundred old Oak trees and from time to time it will be necessary to dig out a stump. Is the backhoe attachment robust enough to dig up a decent size stump? I've seen several videos and most of the work I have seen has been in areas that have fairly soft soil. We live on 10 acres in the foothills of the Sierras of central California and the ground here gets hard as a rock in the summer months. Other uses will be mowing about 4 acres in the "green" time of year, trenching fairly long runs up to the back of the property, a little grading work and just miscellaneous other tasks around the place. As an old retired fart ease of use is also an issue, so naturally the ease of installing and removing implements and attachments is a big deal to me and JD seems to have the market cornered in that area. Right now the dealer has some very good pricing and the time is right.

I have an older JD401C that is just not right for me because the FEL does not come off and it can be a pain in the backside to work in tight spaces. Like I said we have lots of trees. Also as someone who is not a very experienced equipment operator I feel more comfortable on a smaller unit. (Part of the property is a little hilly.)

Have any of you made the purchase then just wished you'd gone another route?

Thanks for your time and help

Steve
 

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I have to say, I too wonder if the backhoe would be up to the hard pan that we have here in Oxford CT. The ground here is like concrete and it's laced with stones. Is an H260 up to that task?
 

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Welcome to GTT!

The one series is very capable, but limited. They absolutely will be able to pull stumps with the backhoe, but the bigger the stump, the more patience you'll need. Eventually you'll find a size (and that size is relative to your situation) that really isn't practical for a one series. There are tons of owners here who have dug/removed many a stump with a one series.:good2:

BTW, I edited the title to highlight what your questions were about. That'll help attract more responses. :good2:
 

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Depends

on the size and depth of the stumps. But in general "yes" it will do the job. You will not get the stumps out lickity split but they will come out with the BH. You may have to manually cut some of the larger roots.

So you can get the tractor and be willing to take the time to dig up the stump or use dynamite..


Oh and: :gtfam:


Steve
 

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Welcome to GTT. As a non backhoe owner, I will let others answer that. I will say ease of implement switching is just that, easy. I remove my MMM every week after mowing because I can have it off in 3 minutes and back on in 5, and my MMM is NOT Autoconnect. Also the 1 series is a good mowing machine, IMHO. Have fun shopping
 

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I have a 1025r TLB. I live in SE Idaho but am quite familiar with some of the Sierra dirt from Lincoln south to Copperopolis.
Those big oaks up by Ione are tough for for a Case 580 BUT as others have pointed out you can dig out some substantial stumps with a 1 Series BH and a LOT OF PATIENCE.
There have been a few times where it made it a lot easier for me to wet the clay down the day before.
I have dug some decent stumps with mine by taking my time. I have never been sorry I bought the 1 Series with BH but I only have 2¼ acres and use the tractor a lot inside the barn so bigger wouldn't work for me. I still have a LARGE old cottonwood to take out and if it turns out to be too much to be practical, I will just borrow something bigger.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the quick replies

Thanks to you all for the quick responses, I'm feeling pretty good about the choice and think I'll probably end up going with the 1026. As far as time goes, I've got plenty of that being retired. Never in a hurry about anything these days. I just work until I don't feel like any longer then get back to it when I do feel like it again.

Steve
 

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I have a 260 BH on a 1026R (predecessor to the 1025R) and have dug out several stumps with it. I'd say the largest one was about 18" diameter cherry. As others have said, patience is needed, and I would suggest a ripper tooth to get in between the roots, at least to expose them for easier cutting with an axe or chainsaw. The ripper tooth also allows you to cut through thicker roots than the bucket, as the BH bucket is too wide to really get in and loosen the dirt around them and grab single roots. You will also have to reposition many times to get the right angle between the roots if they are too large to cut with the bucket or ripper tooth.

I find that an old axe used to cut through the larger roots, after exposed, then use the BH to tear them out of the ground works for me. And as you always encounter rocks around the roots, sharpening an old axe is easier than re-sharpening a chainsaw chain. After the majority of the larger roots are cut, you can them begin to shake the stump until you can push it over and finally out.

The series 1 is a small machine, and my only "regret" during stump removal is not having a larger tractor/BH. Don't get me wrong, I really like my 1026R, and my tight quarters and small yard really doesn't justify a larger tractor. It may take longer, but it can and will do the job. It sure beats digging stumps by hand ... which I have done many before my tractor.

Good luck on your search, that's my 2 cents.
 

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I've removed alot of stumps with my 260. With that said, you won't win any races and must have patience. Sometimes it takes me hours to do anything larger then 10-12" diameter. And if it's one of those trees where the main root goes straight down, good luck. I will eventually have a bigger machine or rent one, because I always have stumps to remove. I have about 15 waiting right now but we are having some construction work done very shortly and the site prep guy is going to leave his mini excavator for me to use which will make short work of those 15 in a couple hours.
 

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Panhead, Welcome to GTT.
As for the BH question I'll give you my perspective.
Back in 1988 we bought our first tractor with a BH, a JD 650. I could dig any stump out with that thing, loved it. Fast forward, in 2008 we traded for a 2320 with a BH.
Last year I removed a bunch of tree stumps using my friends JD 50 excavator.
The point is, a new tractor along with a new operator removing stumps is far better than using a shovel but still a PITA and very time consuming.
As time went on digging stumps with our tractor just wasn't as practical as it SEEMED in the very beginning.
We use our BH a lot just not for digging stumps.......well occasionally I will.
 

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You may want to add one of these to your arsenal for breaking into hard pan.



It is a ripper I picked up from BroTek the same time I got the mechaical thumb. The thumb stays on all the time, and I usually have the 12" bucket mounted, but the ripper replaces it when needed. For me, it is a good option when removing smaller growth without too much disturbance to the surrounding area and breaking up ground very selectively in a planting area.

Nick
 

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Panhead, Welcome to GTT.
As for the BH question I'll give you my perspective.
a new tractor along with a new operator removing stumps is far better than using a shovel but still a PITA and very time consuming.
Not having a BH, truer words were never spoken. :bigthumb:
 

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Yes, way better than a shovel. When I was a kid, my family moved to a new house and there were many stumps around the property, some that were completely in the way. My brothers and I were tasked with digging them out. We had shovels, a pick axe, maul, and axe to work with. I think we got three of them out, and each one was days and days of work. I'm tired just remembering it.

In comparison, my 260 backhoe is awesome and I love it. I've dug out several stumps of about 10"-16" diameter, and it takes me up to about four hours to get one out. Four hours is a pretty long time, but... compared to days, I'll take it! It's a lot more fun, too! I've been able to learn a lot more about how to operate the hoe (and tractor) from that time, and feel I'm improving technique each time. But, the big limiter is that the hoe just isn't that big. The bucket only has 250 pounds of breakout force, if memory serves. It's easy to do some work with the loader bucket (which has 1200 pounds of breakout force) to see that it's vastly more powerful than the hoe. The many movements of the hoe and smaller bucket sure make it maneuverable compared to the loader, though! And, how much breakout force does that shovel have again? :laugh: The 260 is totally worth it, you just have to understand what you're buying.
 

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I bought my 1025r with the 260 backhoe in late March. I have not met a stump that I couldn't get out. I have pulled out many, many stumps of all sizes. Sure some of them can take some time, but you can do it with the 260.
 

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No stump is a match vs patience of 260 operator

I bought my 1025r with the 260 over 2 years ago now, the intentions were to run drainage ditches and a few holes. Finding a few stumps along the way, not one stump has been too large to get out of the ground. I had never operated a back hoe before so I had a learning curve. One huge step was learning I don't need the throttle up to run the backhoe. This caused a lot of jerky motion when trying to control the BH. I now leave it on idle and it does fantastic. I prefer stumps below 24" mark, that seems to be my patience break off. My last stump removal was for a friend, being bored and really wanting to do work on the 1025 I accepted the challenge of a 72' willow. With a stump of this size it would be impossible for a 1025 to rip it out of the ground and the hole size getting it off the feeder roots would have been huge not even sure how to estimate that hole size. So basically we made the hole about 5' around the stump. Cut the roots to loosen the stump and with a lot of patience it did the job it was expected to do. However I could push or pull the stump but flat impossible for me to lift it up. So it was interesting flipping it out of the way, we eventually quartered the stump so I could move it out. So if you have the time - you will win on any stump. Just remember a small stump still needs a large hole and idle speed for the 260.
 

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dieselshadow's response was perfect. "...the bigger the stump, the more patience you'll need."

The 260 is a lightweight BH attachment for a tractor, not an 100+ hp excavator. However with patience, I can pluck these from gravel/rock infested red clay in the Appalachians.

IMG_3522 2.jpg


And welcome to GTT!
 

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You may want to add one of these to your arsenal for breaking into hard pan.



It is a ripper I picked up from BroTek the same time I got the mechaical thumb. The thumb stays on all the time, and I usually have the 12" bucket mounted, but the ripper replaces it when needed. For me, it is a good option when removing smaller growth without too much disturbance to the surrounding area and breaking up ground very selectively in a planting area.

Nick
That is an excellent tool for ripping roots and breaking up stumps. :big thumb:

The standard bucket on a 260 backhoe can be very frustrating for fresh, large stumps.
Things can get broken, blown or bent very easily.
Even running big iron, stumps can be a chore sometimes.

Be extremely patient if you plan on removing large stumps would be my advice.
 

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The bucket only has 250 pounds of breakout force, if memory serves. It's easy to do some work with the loader bucket (which has 1200 pounds of breakout force) to see that it's vastly more powerful than the hoe.
Your memory did not serve you well here...
The 260 BH has 2000lbs of breakout force at the bucket, 280lbs of lift fully extended with the main boom. It has done everything I have asked it to do, including digging out a few stumps, but it could not break through 2" of ice.


Mr. Moose
 
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