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New acreage...previous owner built boxes and filled them with potting soil and some river rock down deep.

Planted tomatoes this spring and I some green maters on the plants. But the bottoms are looking rather rough.

I've been watering them daily lately (in the mid 90's here the last week).

Suggestions?

20190702_185602.jpg
 

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More water. Try some Miracle Grow.
 

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The downside side to raised beds and containers is they dry out quickly. The soil should be moist but not soaked. You may need to water twice a day . :dunno: With the amount of rain we have been getting lately,there is no need for watering around here.
 

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New acreage...previous owner built boxes and filled them with potting soil and some river rock down deep.

Planted tomatoes this spring and I some green maters on the plants. But the bottoms are looking rather rough.

I've been watering them daily lately (in the mid 90's here the last week).

Suggestions?

It's been my experience when it does that it's getting to much water. To much water will make it rot from the ground up.
 

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You may also have a problem in your soil. And it is common to many including myself. Leaves generally turn yellow & also have black spots on them. Causes care in some cases, improper amount of water, like too much or too little. Generally they need about an inch of water per week. But this is just a general rule of thumb. The second issue is you have a soil born bacteria or parasite. This usually travels up the plant & feeds off the leaves. But what happens, this bacteria/parasite blocks off the water & nutrient flow to those leaves causing the die back. Generally there is very little you can do about this. Even changing out all the soil for new may not do a thing to help in the future. If the cause is biological, you would have to sterilize the soil, any & all tools you use including stepping into the soil which may be contaminating the bed.

Sterilizing the soil can be done when all plants are removed & you use a solution of formaldehyde drench. However your probably not going to be able to buy formaldehyde, and it requires a very specific procedure since not only will it kill bacteria, but also anything else in there like earthworms & you if your careless.

But not to worry! The good news is that if you have tomatoes growing on those sick plants, they will survive & mature & be 100% to eat. In case the plant really fails you can always pull the matoes & put them in a dark place or brown paper bag & let them ripen. Keep the bag closed & check every few days & be patient. Next year rotate the growing spot & get rid of those stupid tomato cages. Either make your own cages with wire mesh of your choice & stake them in. Those things you have are too tight. They need room to spread & make them at least 3.5' to 4 feet high.

If your matoes are developing black spots on the bottom, you have Tomato blossom rot most likely. That's caused by too much water usually. Generally uneven watering causes a lot of problems. Don't drown them one day & then starve them the next. Maintain the same amount & watering pattern while growing. Uneven watering causes more problems than you want to know about. As you get into this watch how the fruit is growing. Size & shape tells you a lot about water. Do not over fertilize. All you will do is grow a giant plant & little fruit as the plant consumes the fertilizer but does little for fruit size & yield. Hobby veggie gardening can make you go nuts over the years. Look what its done to me:laugh: I started when I was 13 years old in the back yard wanting something to do. Now I'm older than the dirt I grow my stuff in & still can't get it right. And there is nothing wrong with potting soil & raised beds. Just watch your water & fertilizer but don't obsess over. As we say, There's always next year to try again.
 

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If you have this,, it is bad,,

tomato blight - Google Search

our county was once considered the county that produced the most tomatoes in the USA,,

The blight struck, the tomato business is GONE,, the blight is in the soil, it never goes away,,, :flag_of_truce:

We still raise tomatoes, plenty for the family, but, not full season, the blight gets them.

It starts from the bottom and moves up. and it helps that the tomato leaves never touch the soil,,,
 

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New acreage...previous owner built boxes and filled them with potting soil and some river rock down deep.

Planted tomatoes this spring and I some green maters on the plants. But the bottoms are looking rather rough.

I've been watering them daily lately (in the mid 90's here the last week).

Suggestions?

View attachment 693768
You dog (bottom corner) seems pretty discouraged with the tomatoes :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I pinched off the brown stems / leaves, and cut back on watering. I'm seeing lots of fruit...nothing turning ripe yet.

We will see..

(Auguste: this is my wife's rescue dog...dumb as a bag of hammers...but good dog...I call him "Mr. Pointy Ears" vs. my Yellow Lab, Zeke, aka, "Mr. Floppy Ears.")
 

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I pinched off the brown stems / leaves, and cut back on watering. I'm seeing lots of fruit...nothing turning ripe yet.

We will see..

(Auguste: this is my wife's rescue dog...dumb as a bag of hammers...but good dog...I call him "Mr. Pointy Ears" vs. my Yellow Lab, Zeke, aka, "Mr. Floppy Ears.")
Great expression :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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I am a fan of using a layer of wood chips for mulch. It helps retain water, keeps weeds down, and just turn them in at the end of the season as part of next season's plant food.

Seems to work well, at least for me. Nice part is, I have a lot of branches and make my own chips.

It works well on rhubarb too. Haven't tried it much on other things in the veggie garden yet.

All the other chips I make go into the compost bins. I am currently expanding them so the loader bucket will fit. I am getting too old to turn the compost by hand.
 
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