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2020 1025R, 120R Loader, 54D mower, 260B Backhoe, RT3049 Rotary Tiller, AP10F 42" forks, 54" blower
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking at trailering my 1025R with BH and (future) 54 JD snow blower. I'm thinking of going either 16' or 18' - maybe with a dovetail. Not sure if I want to spend the $ for a car hauler type. The dovetail seems like a good idea but is it really necessary? I live about 10 miles from my work (which is a multiuse building - my printing company on the first floor and 3 apartments on the top) and I can't find a good snow service so I need to take this on myself and what a better way that a new JD snow blower on my johnny. Just don't want to under buy and have regrets.
Thanks-
 

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With loader and backhoe on the tractor, I think I would be looking at the 18ft just to have a little fudge factor.
With a 1025's limited ground clearance, I think the dove tail is an excellent idea. I would look for an 18ft dove tail utility trailer with a drop down tailgate/ramp. This is my 20ft with the 4066R on it. Dove tail, pipe top, with drop down ramp gate.
Wheel Tire Cloud Sky Plant
 

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2020 1025R, 120R Loader, 54D mower, 260B Backhoe, RT3049 Rotary Tiller, AP10F 42" forks, 54" blower
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
With loader and backhoe on the tractor, I think I would be looking at the 18ft just to have a little fudge factor.
With a 1025's limited ground clearance, I think the dove tail is an excellent idea. I would look for an 18ft dove tail utility trailer with a drop down tailgate/ramp. This is my 20ft with the 4066R on it. Dove tail, pipe top, with drop down ramp gate.
View attachment 803351
thanks for responding - makes sense the dovetail 18 sounds like the girl for me - 20' is probably over kill for my little 1025.
Does anyone know of any good trailer dealers close to Southeastern Wisconsin they've delt with?
 

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2020 1025R, 120R Loader, 54D mower, 260B Backhoe, RT3049 Rotary Tiller, AP10F 42" forks, 54" blower
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have a Ford Expedition Max (2018) - I got the HD towing package - which I think gives me 9000 lbs. of towing capacity.
I didn't look through this forum yet - I'm lazy - but I'll look more into previous threads tonight.
For the price I like the utility trailers - a local dealer has a 16' 4400 lb capacity for $3500ish. These don't (at least his models) have the dovetail. It seems you have to move up to the car hauler.
I'd like to keep this purchase under $5K - hopefully its possible. Do you know of any good trailer sales companies?
 

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I have a Big Tex 18ft with no dovetail and I regularly tow my brother's Kubota BX with a loader and backhoe and it works great. I didn't want the dovetail because the entry into my neighborhood is steep and I knew it wouldn't clear (I still drag my license plate sometimes). Not sure if a 1025R is lower than the Kubota, but I never have issues loading. I even load my smaller tractors on it (316, 318) and don't catch the mower decks if they're raised up.

Mine is a 70CH like in this video. I think it was around $4k.
 

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Make sure the ramp/gate is rated for the weight. Most utility trailers don't have a ramp that will hold up to heavy equipment, they're mostly for atv/lawn mower, etc.

You're going to lose a lot of front end clearance with a front mount snow blower. I'd make sure you try before you buy.

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1025r with Mauser cab.
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Must have's in my opinion, and I owned a trailer dealership for several years.

1. Tandem axle equipment or car trailer with loading ramps or a tilt deck. Minimum tandem 3,500lb axles with brakes.
2. Do NOT use a utility trailer with a lift gate, it won't hold up due to the weight limits of the lift gate.
3. I would go wood deck verses steel since its a winter loading trailer. Metal decks are slippery to the point of dangerous in the winter or when wet. Plus wood deck you can easily add tie down points.
4. You need an easy way to secure the tractor and implements since you are loading and unloading often. This includes such things as ratchet straps which retract and tie down points on the tractor and trailer deck.
5. Avoid a trailer railing as they don't add tie down points and are a trip risk with the tractor.
6. You need a place to hang tie down straps or a storage place to keep them when the tractor is unloaded or they could end up lost in the snow.
7. Go a minimum 18' in length.
8. Beaver tail or Dove Tail (same thing) is fine, a tile deck is even better.
9. Avoid a "over deck" trailer where the wheels are under the trailer deck. It makes the loading angle steeper and you don't need the full 102" width of the over deck trailer.
10. I would go with a 7' x 18 trailer if it were me. Or a 7 x 20. Any wider is too wide for the Expedition, plus you don't need the width.
11. I would put a weather proof tool box on the front which would be at least 3' wide and 2' tall and deep. You can keep the tie downs in the tool box plus the following tire changing tools.
12. Make sure the trailer has a spare tire rack and tire and wheel.
13. Carry a "Trailer Helper" and a 4 way wrench, you can change flats without a jack this way.
14. Fold down rear stabilizers on the trailer are highly recommended for safety and ease in loading and unloading.
15. Loading ramps are better than lift gates by far.
16. Aluminum trailer over metal, especially since its for winter use. They pull nicer and they don't rust.

This will get you started.
 
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Here, lazy OP. I did a GTT search for you. You do have a CDL? That will come up soon. You will notice the same people have answered the same question many times in the past.

 

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For the price I like the utility trailers - a local dealer has a 16' 4400 lb capacity for $3500ish. These don't (at least his models) have the dovetail. It seems you have to move up to the car hauler.
I'd like to keep this purchase under $5K - hopefully its possible. Do you know of any good trailer sales companies?
You should easily be able to get a really nice trailer for your tractor, we’ll under $5,000. A piece of advice though:
1) Make sure you buy a big enough trailer the first time
2) Make sure you buy a heavy enough trailer the first time
3) Think about what you may haul with this trailer in the future

When I started out buying trailers, I first purchased exactly what I needed at the current moment. A few years down the road, I needed a wider trailer that what I had. Then over time, I had a need to move vehicles which I could not do. When I finally went to spec out a new trailer for my tractor, I knew it would fit on an 18 foot 7k trailer. But, I purchased a 20 foot (18 ft + 2 ft dovetail) 10,000 lb trailer. More trailer than my tractor required, but now it can haul my truck if needed, or I can load my tractor and multiple implements. Simply, think about the future so you aren’t selling and buying trailers every few years. Good luck!
 

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Must have's in my opinion, and I owned a trailer dealership for several years.

1. Tandem axle equipment or car trailer with loading ramps or a tilt deck. Minimum tandem 3,500lb axles with brakes.
2. Do NOT use a utility trailer with a lift gate, it won't hold up due to the weight limits of the lift gate.
3. I would go wood deck verses steel since its a winter loading trailer. Metal decks are slippery to the point of dangerous in the winter or when wet. Plus wood deck you can easily add tie down points.
4. You need an easy way to secure the tractor and implements since you are loading and unloading often. This includes such things as ratchet straps which retract and tie down points on the tractor and trailer deck.
5. Avoid a trailer railing as they don't add tie down points and are a trip risk with the tractor.
6. You need a place to hang tie down straps or a storage place to keep them when the tractor is unloaded or they could end up lost in the snow.
7. Go a minimum 18' in length.
8. Beaver tail or Dove Tail (same thing) is fine, a tile deck is even better.
9. Avoid a "over deck" trailer where the wheels are under the trailer deck. It makes the loading angle steeper and you don't need the full 102" width of the over deck trailer.
10. I would go with a 7' x 18 trailer if it were me. Or a 7 x 20. Any wider is too wide for the Expedition, plus you don't need the width.
11. I would put a weather proof tool box on the front which would be at least 3' wide and 2' tall and deep. You can keep the tie downs in the tool box plus the following tire changing tools.
12. Make sure the trailer has a spare tire rack and tire and wheel.
13. Carry a "Trailer Helper" and a 4 way wrench, you can change flats without a jack this way.
14. Fold down rear stabilizers on the trailer are highly recommended for safety and ease in loading and unloading.
15. Loading ramps are better than lift gates by far.
16. Aluminum trailer over metal, especially since its for winter use. They pull nicer and they don't rust.

This will get you started.
What brand were you selling.
I have owned a lot of tailgate style ramp trailers , never broke any of them.
That trailer pictured also has the rear stabilizer jacks and when loading that 4R on that tail gate ramp , you do have to use them . That trailer has hauled many a tractor a lot heavier then a 1025R. That cab 4066 with loader, filled tires and rear heavy hitch, has to be pushing 8k that Tailgate ramp has never failed. Not 1 problem at all with it.

Personally I hate slide in ramps, they are heavy, they rattle going down the road, and are not near as safe to load and unload with as the solid tailgate type ramp pined onto the Trailer. No chance at all of a ramp slipping , or machine slipping off,
 

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I have a Ford Expedition Max (2018) - I got the HD towing package - which I think gives me 9000 lbs. of towing capacity.
I didn't look through this forum yet - I'm lazy - but I'll look more into previous threads tonight.
For the price I like the utility trailers - a local dealer has a 16' 4400 lb capacity for $3500ish. These don't (at least his models) have the dovetail. It seems you have to move up to the car hauler.
I'd like to keep this purchase under $5K - hopefully its possible. Do you know of any good trailer sales companies?
I think my 20ft trailer pictured was around 4K 3 years ago. Probably just under 5k now days with all the crazy inflation we have seen the past year or so. So 18ft version should come in well inside your 5k budget.
 
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While it's likely covered in the many posted threads, a longer trailer will also give you some ability to position the tractor forward or aft so the weight distribution is safe. Proper tounge weight, no tail wagging the dog, etc.
 

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2020 1025R, 120R Loader, 54D mower, 260B Backhoe, RT3049 Rotary Tiller, AP10F 42" forks, 54" blower
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Must have's in my opinion, and I owned a trailer dealership for several years.

1. Tandem axle equipment or car trailer with loading ramps or a tilt deck. Minimum tandem 3,500lb axles with brakes.
2. Do NOT use a utility trailer with a lift gate, it won't hold up due to the weight limits of the lift gate.
3. I would go wood deck verses steel since its a winter loading trailer. Metal decks are slippery to the point of dangerous in the winter or when wet. Plus wood deck you can easily add tie down points.
4. You need an easy way to secure the tractor and implements since you are loading and unloading often. This includes such things as ratchet straps which retract and tie down points on the tractor and trailer deck.
5. Avoid a trailer railing as they don't add tie down points and are a trip risk with the tractor.
6. You need a place to hang tie down straps or a storage place to keep them when the tractor is unloaded or they could end up lost in the snow.
7. Go a minimum 18' in length.
8. Beaver tail or Dove Tail (same thing) is fine, a tile deck is even better.
9. Avoid a "over deck" trailer where the wheels are under the trailer deck. It makes the loading angle steeper and you don't need the full 102" width of the over deck trailer.
10. I would go with a 7' x 18 trailer if it were me. Or a 7 x 20. Any wider is too wide for the Expedition, plus you don't need the width.
11. I would put a weather proof tool box on the front which would be at least 3' wide and 2' tall and deep. You can keep the tie downs in the tool box plus the following tire changing tools.
12. Make sure the trailer has a spare tire rack and tire and wheel.
13. Carry a "Trailer Helper" and a 4 way wrench, you can change flats without a jack this way.
14. Fold down rear stabilizers on the trailer are highly recommended for safety and ease in loading and unloading.
15. Loading ramps are better than lift gates by far.
16. Aluminum trailer over metal, especially since its for winter use. They pull nicer and they don't rust.

This will get you started.
Wow - thanks for the great information - this really helps!
 

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2020 1025R, 120R Loader, 54D mower, 260B Backhoe, RT3049 Rotary Tiller, AP10F 42" forks, 54" blower
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You should easily be able to get a really nice trailer for your tractor, we’ll under $5,000. A piece of advice though:
1) Make sure you buy a big enough trailer the first time
2) Make sure you buy a heavy enough trailer the first time
3) Think about what you may haul with this trailer in the future

When I started out buying trailers, I first purchased exactly what I needed at the current moment. A few years down the road, I needed a wider trailer that what I had. Then over time, I had a need to move vehicles which I could not do. When I finally went to spec out a new trailer for my tractor, I knew it would fit on an 18 foot 7k trailer. But, I purchased a 20 foot (18 ft + 2 ft dovetail) 10,000 lb trailer. More trailer than my tractor required, but now it can haul my truck if needed, or I can load my tractor and multiple implements. Simply, think about the future so you aren’t selling and buying trailers every few years. Good luck!
Great point - thanks!
 

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2005 3320 with FEL, 1978 AC 5020 FEL, 2000 Bobcat 763
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I went thru two big trailers and am now on the third. First was a simple 18 foot with ramps. It did have 5 inch drop axles which lowered deck which was nice but overall it rusted thru. Second was just too short at 14 foot but price was so good. Now I have a tilt bed 20 footer that hs two 5K axles. I love it. Pull the pins and it tilts down, when loaded put the pin and safety pin back in, tie the load down and go, no ramps to mess with. I know when the load is balanced because it tips down my 3320 with FEL and bush hog load easily. Skid steer does not over stress it. I have messed with gates but if the load is too long, gates will not close. Get a bigger trailer then you think you need. An extra 2 foot is really nothing in towing length but when hauling is great. Add a winch, it is sort of like a front end loader, it just comes in handy. Also get brakes on both axles for safety.
 

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2020 1025R, 120R Loader, 54D mower, 260B Backhoe, RT3049 Rotary Tiller, AP10F 42" forks, 54" blower
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
You make some good points. I will definitely look around but i have a sneaky suspicion that any tilting ability will fall outside of my budget. I wouldn’t mind going over but the Mrs is being a bit of a stickler. It definitely would be nice though.
 

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2020 1025R, 120R Loader, 54D mower, 260B Backhoe, RT3049 Rotary Tiller, AP10F 42" forks, 54" blower
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Here, lazy OP. I did a GTT search for you. You do have a CDL? That will come up soon. You will notice the same people have answered the same question many times in the past.

Thanks Clyde - you know that you are enabling my laziness & I appreciate it! Thanks
 

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It sounds like you are going to be using this trailer frequently to move your tractor from home to your business and then back.

I would strongly recommend you get one that is the the easiest to load / unload as you can. About your third trip you will likely regret a few dollars saved.

A blade or blower on the front of a 1 series requires a low approach angle. So does a rear mounted implement.

I would measure both before shopping.
 
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