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If one could only predict what fuel prices and availability would be in the future.....

I love my diesels - as a matter of fact the only gasoline engine I have in my vehicles and equipment is my 1/2 ton pickup. It just doesn't make sense to me to have a diesel in a 1/2 ton pickup especially now that diesel costs more than gasoline.

Don't get me wrong- I would love to have one. But to pay a premium like that (just guessing at $3k?) for the diesel option plus the higher cost of fuel just doesn't justify itself for me.
 

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I saw one the other day while dropping a coworker off at a Nissan dealer, the fully dressed Platinum Edition was stickered at $61,800 :pickup:
 

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Toyota is on board with the same Cummins V8 in their Tundra for the '17 model year.
I'll believe that when I see it. There have been rumors of a Tundra Diesel going back to 2006 and every time they are supposedly "close", it gets kicked down the road another 2 or 3 years.

I took my Tundra in to the dealer yesterday for 2 software updates. While I was there I wandered the lot and noticed they have almost NO Tundras or Tacomas. (and this is a BIG lot with hundreds of cars) When I went back inside I asked the sales guys about it and was told they can't keep them in stock. With gas prices dropping they are selling like crazy. Was asked if I wanted to trade mine in because they can't get ahold of enough late model used Tundras to sell. (btw, up here the dealers are offering 90% of original retail as trade-in value for 2012-2014 Tundras)

I mentioned that the only way I was trading mine in was if I was getting a Diesel Tundra in return. All the sale guys just shook their heads. Not happening.
 

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I'll believe that when I see it. There have been rumors of a Tundra Diesel going back to 2006 and every time they are supposedly "close", it gets kicked down the road another 2 or 3 years.

I took my Tundra in to the dealer yesterday for 2 software updates. While I was there I wandered the lot and noticed they have almost NO Tundras or Tacomas. (and this is a BIG lot with hundreds of cars) When I went back inside I asked the sales guys about it and was told they can't keep them in stock. With gas prices dropping they are selling like crazy. Was asked if I wanted to trade mine in because they can't get ahold of enough late model used Tundras to sell. (btw, up here the dealers are offering 90% of original retail as trade-in value for 2012-2014 Tundras)

I mentioned that the only way I was trading mine in was if I was getting a Diesel Tundra in return. All the sale guys just shook their heads. Not happening.

It's happening, it's just a question of when. Toyota and Honda cannot and will not let a market segment go unopposed. I know that both have delayed US Diesels since the mid to late 2000's mostly in response to changing emissions requirements and their unwillingness to half-a$$ a market entry and the tech behind it.

They use diesels in all other markets major and minor across the globe except for the US, partly due to the emissions requirements and the US perceptions on dirty, noisy, smelly diesels. Neither one will bring anything to market unless it's well proven, a good performer and tested thoroughly.

For myself I can't wait until Honda starts putting diesels into their vehicles. They have worked out the exhaust emissions issue without using urea to treat it-I'll me waiting in line for one in one of their models.
 

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It's happening, it's just a question of when. Toyota and Honda cannot and will not let a market segment go unopposed. I know that both have delayed US Diesels since the mid to late 2000's mostly in response to changing emissions requirements and their unwillingness to half-a$$ a market entry and the tech behind it.

They use diesels in all other markets major and minor across the globe except for the US, partly due to the emissions requirements and the US perceptions on dirty, noisy, smelly diesels. Neither one will bring anything to market unless it's well proven, a good performer and tested thoroughly.

For myself I can't wait until Honda starts putting diesels into their vehicles. They have worked out the exhaust emissions issue without using urea to treat it-I'll me waiting in line for one in one of their models.
I'd love to see it! I like my Tundra with the singular exception of the gas mileage - especially when towing. A diesel would be the absolute bomb. The previously proposed Tundra HD Diesel (a 3/4 ton dually) would be even better.



The Tundra Diesel rumor timeline:

August, 2006 – At a dealer meeting in San Antonio, Toyota tells dealers that the next-generation Tundra will be offered in a 3/4 ton (HD) version. Toyota also tells dealers to expect a diesel version of the truck.

September, 2007 – Toyota VP Kazuo Okamoto indicates that the Tundra will be the first US vehicle Toyota offers to receive a diesel engine.

October, 2007 – Toyota debuts a dually version of the Tundra (shown below) with a 8.1L HINO diesel at SEMA. Rumors of both a Heavy Duty (HD) diesel Tundra and a light duty diesel Tundra continue.

December, 2007 – Based on comments from Toyota execs, the amount of evidence, and comments from sources, we predict that Toyota will release a light-duty diesel in 2009.

January, 2008 – Jim Lentz, at the time President of Sales for Toyota USA, announces that Toyota will not build a hybrid Tundra. Instead, they will focus on building an efficient diesel version of the Tundra. This further confirms the likelihood of a light duty diesel Tundra.

May, 2008 – Edmunds.com reports that Toyota will release the light-duty diesel Tundra in 2009 as a 2010 model, echoing our earlier prediction. Edmunds.com further reports the diesel will be an Americanized version of Toyota’s 4.5L diesel currently in use in Australia.

July, 2008 – Facing slumping sales, Toyota consolidates all Tundra production in San Antonio. As a result, we predict the HD Tundra is tabled indefinitely.

September, 2008 – Toyota indefinitely delays the light duty 4.5L Tundra diesel.

November, 2008 – Despite the fact that Toyota does not have any plans to produce an HD Tundra at any point in the immediate future, Toyota continues to show off the dually Tundra concept truck.

December, 2008 – A general collapse of the North American automotive market triggers a massive decline in pickup truck sales. Ford, GM, Ram, and Toyota all back off of plans to bring out new features, etc., until truck market recovers.

August, 2009 – Indian automaker Mahindra promises to begin selling a mid-sized pickup with a diesel engine, and industry momentum seems to build towards light-duty diesel trucks.

September, 2009 – At Texas State Fair, Toyota executives confirm that a diesel version of the Tundra is at least 3 years away.

July, 2010 – While giving an interview to the Wall Street Journal, a Toyota executive confirms that the 2014 Tundra is under development. However, there is no mention of a diesel powertrain.

July 2011 – In an interview with Automotive News, a senior Toyota executive explains that Toyota has difficulty investing in the Tundra until sales volumes meet the initial expectation set when Toyota redesigned the Tundra in 2007.

August 2011 – Rumors of future products from Ford, GM, Ram, and Toyota begin to fly. However, sources continue to tell TundraHeadquarters that there are no plans for diesel Tundra.

February 2012 – As news continues to pour in on the upcoming 2014 Tundra, Toyota sources offer no news of diesel Tundra.

September 2013 – An Edmunds.com reporter got a Toyota executive to say that they are looking at a Cummins diesel engine. This follows news that Nissan will offer one in a new Titan. While the buzz has grown, there is nothing to suggest this will actually happen.

November 2014: Ward’s Auto, AutoGuide, and Car&Driver all reported that the 2016 Tundra will be getting a 5.0L Cummins diesel.



The 2016s are out. There is no Tundra diesel. I'm not holding my breath! :laugh:
 

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I saw one the other day while dropping a coworker off at a Nissan dealer, the fully dressed Platinum Edition was stickered at $61,800 :pickup:
Here's some information on the new RAM EcoDiesel and Nissan - Cummins Diesel engines that you may find interesting

5.0L Cummins Vs 3.0L EcoDiesel Head To Head Comparison

 

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The previous Nissan full-size was a joke. Sorry - but the sales figures showed that to be true as well.

Nissan sold roughly 1000-1500/month over the lifetime of that truck. What a huge investment with little payoff. I'm amazed they are going to try it again.

I just don't understand why anyone would buy that over a domestic vehicle. And YES - Ford's ARE more domestic that any Toyota or Nissan pick-up truck, regardless of where Toyota/Nissan assemble their vehicles. All research and development, as well as all of the equipment in the assembly plants for those vehicles comes from Japan (those things AREN'T included in the % American value on the window sticker.)

All Ford pick-ups are made in Kansas City, MO, Dearborn, MI, or Louisville, KY.
 

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The previous Nissan full-size was a joke. Sorry - but the sales figures showed that to be true as well.

Nissan sold roughly 1000-1500/month over the lifetime of that truck. What a huge investment with little payoff. I'm amazed they are going to try it again.

I just don't understand why anyone would buy that over a domestic vehicle. And YES - Ford's ARE more domestic that any Toyota or Nissan pick-up truck, regardless of where Toyota/Nissan assemble their vehicles. All research and development, as well as all of the equipment in the assembly plants for those vehicles comes from Japan (those things AREN'T included in the % American value on the window sticker.)

All Ford pick-ups are made in Kansas City, MO, Dearborn, MI, or Louisville, KY.
I traded in a F250 when I bought my Tundra. I traded it in because it was a piece of garbage.

Oh! The spark plugs randomly shoot out of the engine while you're driving down the highway? Yeah, that's a problem but we aren't issuing a recall and fixing it. You just need to take it to your local Ford dealer and have them use our special tool to fix it at $900 every time it happens. The good news is that there are only 8 spark plugs in the engine! Oh, and your entire front end needs to be replaced every spring after hitting potholes? Yeah, sorry about that. Just take it to your local Ford dealer and for $2,000 they'll replace all your ball joints and tie-rod ends for you! Oh yeah, and about all the rust on your bed, the doors and rocker panels? Yeah, that's an unfortunate design issue but... we fixed it in the new models! All you have to do is buy a new truck!

I've owned 3 Ford vehicles over the years and every single one of them was a lemon. I will NEVER own a Ford product again. I also owned a GMC pickup which was better than any of the Fords but had it's own quirks and issues.

I buy vehicles to drive them. I don't see why anyone should be expected to buy a vehicle based on where it's built if it can't be relied upon to perform the basic functions it's advertised to do.
 

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If you buy a Ford truck you better look inside the door who knows it could come from Malaysia or Vietnam instead of the USA.
Where Are Ford Trucks Made? (with Pictures) | eHow
I hope I am wrong but look for yourself!

Doug
My 2016 f250 was assembled in Kentucky as was my dads 2014 f150. Ford sells vehicles world wide and as plants over seas too. Gm and Ram also have plants in other countries.
 

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If you buy a Ford truck you better look inside the door who knows it could come from Malaysia or Vietnam instead of the USA.
Where Are Ford Trucks Made? (with Pictures) | eHow
I hope I am wrong but look for yourself!

Doug
That article couldn't be more wrong if it tried.

F-150's are built in only (2) plants today - Kansas City, MO and Dearborn, MI
F-250/350/450 are built in Louisville, KY
F-550/650 are built in Strongsville, OH

Rangers ARE currently built overseas, but they are built in the markets they serve and are NOT exported to the US.

Rumor has it the Ranger is returning to the US market and will be coming to a plant in Michigan.

ALL Ford trucks sold in the US are built in the US.

As for Toyota trucks.....rusting in half and having to replace the entire truck is NOT reliable either.....
 

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Sounds good

Thanks
Doug
 

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That article couldn't be more wrong if it tried.

F-150's are built in only (2) plants today - Kansas City, MO and Dearborn, MI
F-250/350/450 are built in Louisville, KY
F-550/650 are built in Strongsville, OH

Rangers ARE currently built overseas, but they are built in the markets they serve and are NOT exported to the US.

Rumor has it the Ranger is returning to the US market and will be coming to a plant in Michigan.

ALL Ford trucks sold in the US are built in the US.

As for Toyota trucks.....rusting in half and having to replace the entire truck is NOT reliable either.....
I'm handling a project for one of my customers who owns Ford-Lincoln, Toyota, Honda, Nissan and Kia dealerships. Was out at their Honda & Toyota locations recently and they had no less then 50 rotted Tundra & Tacoma frames stacked behind their shop awaiting the scrapper. They also had probably ~25 of each new replacement frames awaiting installation. He said they were held-up waiting for fuel tanks, springs, various steel lines and control arms that were also problems with those vehicles and needed to be changed out at the same time.

No manufacturer intentionally makes a bad vehicle. Some of these problems are the result of pushing a supplier for lower costs. Toyota quality has suffered greatly over the years due to this strategy. Other manufacturers had to learn that lesson the hard way. The bigger you are, the harder you fall.

During the early 2000's all OEM's were having quality issues on top of union, unfunded pension liability, lack of profitability and investor relations problems. Lot's of bad apples were built and sold. Due to the related "goodwill" costs the manufacturers fell back on warranty limits. Some were struggling to survive. Cost them big time with consumers. They probably should have done a better job looking "down the road" as they say.
 

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:focus:
 

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I'm hoping these diesel engines spill over to the SUV line. I'd love to get my hands on a diesel Durango, Armada, Sequoia.....
 
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