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I went out to start my 3520, when I turned the key there was a pop and now nothing works. No power, not even the lights go on. I tested the battery and it was fine. I pulled the fuses and they were fine. No idea how to test a relay or tell if one is blown? Could a relay kill all incoming power? Any ideas what else I should check?
 

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How did you test the battery? Your description matches to a tee the sound of “Sudden death battery syndrome”.

When my 2720 battery died without warning it did exactly as you describe.
 

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How did you test the battery? Your description matches to a tee the sound of “Sudden death battery syndrome”.

When my 2720 battery died without warning it did exactly as you describe.
I used a voltage tester. never had battery issues, been running a lot over last couple weeks.
 

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I used a voltage tester. never had battery issues, been running a lot over last couple weeks.
What did the voltage read? Since you said the tractor won't do anything I assume you could not measure the voltage while cranking or with a load. That is where the faulty voltage reading will occur.

When my battery died it never gave so much as a hiccup prior. Then one day I started it up (cranked normally) pulled it out of the garage and let it sit. 15-mins I went to start it to put it away and just a big CLUNK sound and nothing. Battery voltage showed normal at rest but when I put a load on it the voltage dropped down to less than 8 volts.
 

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Hopefully it's just the battery. I had something similar happen where I was using the 4200 all morning, shut it off for break and nothing happened when my break was over. I took the battery to one of the local parts stores and they said it was fine. It turned out the alternator or something in it puked, which was a lot more expensive than a battery. I did get the optional heavy duty (55amps vs stock 40amps) alternator since I was spending the bucks at the time.
 

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What did the voltage read? Since you said the tractor won't do anything I assume you could not measure the voltage while cranking or with a load. That is where the faulty voltage reading will occur.

When my battery died it never gave so much as a hiccup prior. Then one day I started it up (cranked normally) pulled it out of the garage and let it sit. 15-mins I went to start it to put it away and just a big CLUNK sound and nothing. Battery voltage showed normal at rest but when I put a load on it the voltage dropped down to less than 8 volts.
I was 12 volts. Nothing works, it's like there is no battery attached. No response to anything. The battery is old so I will start there.

Thank You
matt
 

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I went out to start my 3520, when I turned the key there was a pop and now nothing works. No power, not even the lights go on. I tested the battery and it was fine. I pulled the fuses and they were fine. No idea how to test a relay or tell if one is blown? Could a relay kill all incoming power? Any ideas what else I should check?
This sounds suspicious to me.

I've had two occurrences of JD Strong Box Sudden Death and there was never a pop and the lights would still work, although dim.

If you haven't pulled the battery yet I would check and see if there is any voltage at the fuses.

Maybe someone has an electrical diagram of your tractor that could be shared.

Nothing wrong with taking the battery to the store and having it tested but your description of a "pop" has me wondering. Click maybe, but "pop" and electrical has never been a good thing in my experience.
 

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Had SBD syndrome happen to me on a 6330 that I use. Was fine the day before, turn the key on and the dash and everything comes up, but turn the key and nothing. Battery was replaced with another deere battery so who knows how long it will last.

I would get a helper to turn the key to start while you read the voltage. Is it below 12.7? if id dips really low when you try to start it the battery is bad. Also make sure the terminals are clean and shiny on the wires and the battery.
 

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This sounds suspicious to me.

I've had two occurrences of JD Strong Box Sudden Death and there was never a pop and the lights would still work, although dim.

If you haven't pulled the battery yet I would check and see if there is any voltage at the fuses.

Maybe someone has an electrical diagram of your tractor that could be shared.

Nothing wrong with taking the battery to the store and having it tested but your description of a "pop" has me wondering. Click maybe, but "pop" and electrical has never been a good thing in my experience.
I have a diagram of the electrical and I will try that before I replace the battery. Figure that will tell me if the power is getting to the fuses and what that voltage is. I swear there was a pop like a breaker popping. All the fuses were fine, no idea how to test the relays or if that could even be part of the problem. Now when you turn the key it is not a real smooth turn, feels different. Maybe because the noise of the engine covered it up before so I never noticed.

Thank you
M
 
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Now when you turn the key it is not a real smooth turn, feels different. Maybe because the noise of the engine covered it up before so I never noticed.

Thank you
M
That statement makes me wonder if the internals of the key switch broke. Can you get to the back side of the switch to check voltage and continuity?
 

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That statement makes me wonder if the internals of the key switch broke. Can you get to the back side of the switch to check voltage and continuity?
Not sure but I will have to remove a panel to get behind the fuse box so we will see what is accessible. If that is broken, would that cause the light to not work also?
 

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If that is broken, would that cause the light to not work also?
I wouldn't have thought so if they turned on before without the switch on. Just throwing out ideas since you said the switch feels funny now. :dunno:
 

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That statement makes me wonder if the internals of the key switch broke. Can you get to the back side of the switch to check voltage and continuity?
Pretty good idea, if some small metal part of the switch broke and got across HOT and ground you'd probably get an audible
pop as it arced out and maybe vaporized.
 

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Thank you for the help - problem solved

I went to test the voltage at the fuse panel but before I did I tried the key one more time. Now my hearing in not very good and I must have missed it the first time, this time I could hear a clicking like a starter solenoid. So I had my son test the voltage while I was turning the key. It dropped immediately from 12 to 6. Went out and picked up a new battery. Once installed the engine turned right over.

Thank you everyone who replied with suggestions and ideas.

Matt
 

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I bet we have this type of thread posting that I see here on GTT, with an electrical issue described just as this thread was, at least 2 or 3 times each month. It doesn't matter the vehicle size or if its a lawn tractor, SCUT, CUT, gator, etc. The vast majority of the time, it follows a similar set of circumstances. Little to no electrical power, the person posting mentions they voltage tested the battery and got 12 volts or close to it. In some cases, the headlights work, in some cases, they don't. Since the voltmeter showed 12 volts, the search for the problem begins beyond the battery.

Sometimes sooner, other cases, later on, but usually, the person who wrote the thread ends up load testing the battery, usually by taking it into a auto parts store, retailer or dealer. In 90% or more of these cases, the battery fails the load test. The batteries ability to perform under the engine starting load is a critical component of where to start in this process.

If you own vehicles with 6 or 12 volt batteries, you should own one of these basic battery load testers. Hook up the positive and negative battery cables to any battery and immediately, it serves as a voltmeter and tells you the batteries voltage output. Then, push and hold the battery load switch on the battery tester and in 10 seconds or less, you have a definite answer as to whether your battery is good or if it needs to be replaced.

A battery with a defective cell or plate will often show voltage output when tested with a voltmeter in the area of 12 volts. However, a defective battery won't have the cranking amps necessary to start the vehicle, which is precisely what the battery load test is determining. This is why the battery voltage alone doesn't determine a batteries true health and ability to function and meet the engine starting needs. There is no better way to determine whether its time to replace your battery than a load test.

The tester will also show you if your battery is strong or marginal or failing. The tester is very easy to read and the answers it provides are very clear and don't require interpretation. Good / Fair / Bad. or Strong / Weak. Pretty simple. That 10 seconds of testing time will give you all the answers you need. You then know whether the battery needs to be replaced or you confirm the battery is acceptable and to look elsewhere for the issue the equipment is experiencing.

Once you have the vehicle running, the tester will also show the charging rate of the vehicle, so you can tell whether the alternator or generator is adequately charging the battery. So, this simple and inexpensive tool will provide the battery voltage, determine whether the battery has the strength to start the vehicle, assess the vehicles charging rate and function all for between $20 and $50 for the majority of these testers.

Here are a couple of versions of this battery tester, the lowest cost I could find and the unit which I have an have relied upon for years and its always been precise and very helpful.

Lowest Cost - Harbor Fright $20

https://www.harborfreight.com/100-amp-612v-battery-load-tester-61747.html?cid=paid_google|*PLA+-+All+Products+-+Higher+Sales+Items|New+Products+-+(2)+Price+$10-30|61747&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&mkwid=s3HmHVR1o|pcrid|278918170779|pkw||pmt||pdv|c|slid||product|61747|&pgrid=57009142739&ptaid=pla-300067288033&pcid=1458484684&intent=&gclid=Cj0KCQjws7TqBRDgARIsAAHLHP4_nuU5X0g4bC21P6P1dVt9d-gDzEGiZL-k8dHwpq2ZkZCel0-XiS4aApv6EALw_wcB

The Battery Tester I own and recommend at $38

https://www.amazon.com/Schumacher-BT-100-Battery-Load-Tester/dp/B000AMBOI0/ref=sxin_3_osp20-42b58b28_cov?ascsubtag=42b58b28-4da3-4953-a8b2-713edd8ed4d4&creativeASIN=B000AMBOI0&cv_ct_id=amzn1.osp.42b58b28-4da3-4953-a8b2-713edd8ed4d4&cv_ct_pg=search&cv_ct_wn=osp-search&gclid=Cj0KCQjws7TqBRDgARIsAAHLHP44eP1us8RjIEBRjOFeD7BtpU68f07AZvfo8896qKAMksl1FoN1rmQaAusQEALw_wcB&hvadid=241900272228&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9017334&hvnetw=g&hvpos=1t1&hvqmt=e&hvrand=15084552935947207734&hvtargid=kwd-1792583861&hydadcr=24656_10400584&keywords=battery+load+tester&linkCode=oas&pd_rd_i=B000AMBOI0&pd_rd_r=64265492-2ad8-4b89-8a8f-73a79daf57c0&pd_rd_w=VSTVI&pd_rd_wg=IAq2W&pf_rd_p=c501273b-119a-4fc9-ad78-eda5006b0be9&pf_rd_r=343MNFBRQP82X0217MN1&qid=1565391298&s=gateway&tag=bestcont06-20

Do yourself a favor, if you don't have one of these in your toolbox, make it a high priority to get one. Don't be a parts changer hoping to find the problem. Test the equipment and know for sure, what you need to do to get your equipment back in service. It will save you time and money and help you actually diagnose your equipment. I guarantee it..................
 

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Guilty of not having one

I bet we have this type of thread posting that I see here on GTT, with an electrical issue described just as this thread was, at least 2 or 3 times each month. It doesn't matter the vehicle size or if its a lawn tractor, SCUT, CUT, gator, etc. The vast majority of the time, it follows a similar set of circumstances. Little to no electrical power, the person posting mentions they voltage tested the battery and got 12 volts or close to it. In some cases, the headlights work, in some cases, they don't. Since the voltmeter showed 12 volts, the search for the problem begins beyond the battery.

Sometimes sooner, other cases, later on, but usually, the person who wrote the thread ends up load testing the battery, usually by taking it into a auto parts store, retailer or dealer. In 90% or more of these cases, the battery fails the load test. The batteries ability to perform under the engine starting load is a critical component of where to start in this process.

If you own vehicles with 6 or 12 volt batteries, you should own one of these basic battery load testers. Hook up the positive and negative battery cables to any battery and immediately, it serves as a voltmeter and tells you the batteries voltage output. Then, push and hold the battery load switch on the battery tester and in 10 seconds or less, you have a definite answer as to whether your battery is good or if it needs to be replaced.

A battery with a defective cell or plate will often show voltage output when tested with a voltmeter in the area of 12 volts. However, a defective battery won't have the cranking amps necessary to start the vehicle, which is precisely what the battery load test is determining. This is why the battery voltage alone doesn't determine a batteries true health and ability to function and meet the engine starting needs. There is no better way to determine whether its time to replace your battery than a load test.

The tester will also show you if your battery is strong or marginal or failing. The tester is very easy to read and the answers it provides are very clear and don't require interpretation. Good / Fair / Bad. or Strong / Weak. Pretty simple. That 10 seconds of testing time will give you all the answers you need. You then know whether the battery needs to be replaced or you confirm the battery is acceptable and to look elsewhere for the issue the equipment is experiencing.

Once you have the vehicle running, the tester will also show the charging rate of the vehicle, so you can tell whether the alternator or generator is adequately charging the battery. So, this simple and inexpensive tool will provide the battery voltage, determine whether the battery has the strength to start the vehicle, assess the vehicles charging rate and function all for between $20 and $50 for the majority of these testers.

Here are a couple of versions of this battery tester, the lowest cost I could find and the unit which I have an have relied upon for years and its always been precise and very helpful.

Lowest Cost - Harbor Fright $20

https://www.harborfreight.com/100-amp-612v-battery-load-tester-61747.html?cid=paid_google|*PLA+-+All+Products+-+Higher+Sales+Items|New+Products+-+(2)+Price+$10-30|61747&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&mkwid=s3HmHVR1o|pcrid|278918170779|pkw||pmt||pdv|c|slid||product|61747|&pgrid=57009142739&ptaid=pla-300067288033&pcid=1458484684&intent=&gclid=Cj0KCQjws7TqBRDgARIsAAHLHP4_nuU5X0g4bC21P6P1dVt9d-gDzEGiZL-k8dHwpq2ZkZCel0-XiS4aApv6EALw_wcB

The Battery Tester I own and recommend at $38

https://www.amazon.com/Schumacher-BT-100-Battery-Load-Tester/dp/B000AMBOI0/ref=sxin_3_osp20-42b58b28_cov?ascsubtag=42b58b28-4da3-4953-a8b2-713edd8ed4d4&creativeASIN=B000AMBOI0&cv_ct_id=amzn1.osp.42b58b28-4da3-4953-a8b2-713edd8ed4d4&cv_ct_pg=search&cv_ct_wn=osp-search&gclid=Cj0KCQjws7TqBRDgARIsAAHLHP44eP1us8RjIEBRjOFeD7BtpU68f07AZvfo8896qKAMksl1FoN1rmQaAusQEALw_wcB&hvadid=241900272228&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9017334&hvnetw=g&hvpos=1t1&hvqmt=e&hvrand=15084552935947207734&hvtargid=kwd-1792583861&hydadcr=24656_10400584&keywords=battery+load+tester&linkCode=oas&pd_rd_i=B000AMBOI0&pd_rd_r=64265492-2ad8-4b89-8a8f-73a79daf57c0&pd_rd_w=VSTVI&pd_rd_wg=IAq2W&pf_rd_p=c501273b-119a-4fc9-ad78-eda5006b0be9&pf_rd_r=343MNFBRQP82X0217MN1&qid=1565391298&s=gateway&tag=bestcont06-20

Do yourself a favor, if you don't have one of these in your toolbox, make it a high priority to get one. Don't be a parts changer hoping to find the problem. Test the equipment and know for sure, what you need to do to get your equipment back in service. It will save you time and money and help you actually diagnose your equipment. I guarantee it..................
I'm guilty of not having a load tester but plan to correct that issue. One other thing that I almost always try to do before anything else is simply inspect and clean the terminals and cables. I've had many a dead battery that turned out to be corrosion on the cables. Sometimes it's at the ground end of the cable, sometimes at the battery terminal but either way you can have a good battery and it doesn't work. It's also insidious because many times corrosion on the cables keeps the alternator from fully charging the battery.

Treefarmer
 
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