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I admit now and have numerous times before that I am relatively new to my X738 (24 hrs on my machine) and tractors in general. That being said, I removed my soft cab today, replaced my (snow) blade with my de-thatcher and to feel like a person who knows stuff, I checked my transaxle dipstick.....wait for it......PISSED....nothing on the dipstick with the dipstick resting on the cowling or nothing on dipstick with it turned all the way in....I'm pissed. Not sure I should be but I am.

I am going to contact my dealer tomorrow (whom I have a good relationship with and I'm in discussion on buying a 1025r from him) and ask what the hell??!!

I probably should have checked this earlier but I did not. I just assumed, yes I know what "assume" means, that everything on my tractor should have been ready for a new user to use.

Maybe this machine (and others like it) use amounts of transaxle oil that I would call excessive. My machine does not have a leak (no visible liquids on the ground). Maybe I am over-reacting. Please tell me if I am. Maybe it is as simple as adding Low Viscosity HY-GARD (JD02) as my manual states.
 

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Should have fluid on the dip sticks (thinking 2 maybe 3 maybe 1 havn't been near the x738 for over a month), on front axle , if it hadn't been running within say 30-60 mins. Can't remember the length of time manual says.
With setting level check the level and thinking you only insert the dip stick in the hole , without tightening.

If not get your manual out and it will tell you what to do with awd front axle and transaxle.

Your manual is your best friend, that is the only way you will learn and remember what needs to be done. .I had never changed the front axle on the x738 took my time went step by step and its been fine for past 2 years. Guessing you need to add maybe a 1/2 pint and then check fluid levels and keep doing this till it is full.

Oh and in the manual there are some pretty good photos to go by..
 

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Maybe this machine (and others like it) use amounts of transaxle oil that I would call excessive. My machine does not have a leak (no visible liquids on the ground). Maybe I am over-reacting. Please tell me if I am. Maybe it is as simple as adding Low Viscosity HY-GARD (JD02) as my manual states.
Tractors with hydro transmissions and hydraulics do not consume oil. The only way to lose oil is via a leak - or maybe it wasn't full to start with. I would first park the machine on a level surface and let it sit overnight and then recheck the fluid level. If it is still low add some fluid and monitor the level.

These tractors hold a fair amount of oil in the sump. If the oil level gets too low you will likely hear strange groaning noises and/or experience issues with movement going forward/backward and/or the pedals will feel strange. Otherwise a low oil level can cause the oil to run a bit warmer than normal. You'll have less risk of over heating the oil during the winter than you would a 100-degree summer day.

Let us know what you find when you recheck the oil.
 

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Was there ever fluid on the dipstick or did you never check it and assume the dealer did?

There was an issue with the AWD units being under filled on the assembly line due to oil aeration from filling them too fast and the extra capacity needed for the front axle.

Your dealer should have checked all fluids in the pre delivery inspection!
 

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Whenever I get my truck serviced at the shop I always check the fluids and anything else they have touched. I’ve found the oil 1 quart low, 1 quart high, and the oil fill cap laying on the engine.

As an operator we all have to take some responsibilty for some basic things like checking fluids on a regular basis.
 

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Whenever I get my truck serviced at the shop I always check the fluids and anything else they have touched. I’ve found the oil 1 quart low, 1 quart high, and the oil fill cap laying on the engine.

As an operator we all have to take some responsibilty for some basic things like checking fluids on a regular basis.
I have had my F250 for 10 years now. I had it at a local shop for some work and decided to have them do my oil change. I provided the materials which included 4 gallons of oil. My truck calls for 15 quarts so I expected to get a quart of oil leftover in one of the gallons I provided. I did not. So, I checked the dipstick and it was high! I could have just drained out the quart (I have a Fumoto valve) but decided to make a point with the shop. The tech insisted that he added until the dipstick showed full. I have always followed the manual, and checked later to be sure. Once again, I was reminded why I tend to always do this stuff myself. This was the only time anyone but me has done the oil change on my truck.

Lee
 

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You said you removed your snow blade. If you bought your snow plow new it may have used some of the transaxle fluid to fill the cylinders which raise & angle the blade. I am not sure if the cylinders come filled from the factory or not. At any rate they should not have taken much oil and it should have been rechecked by the dealer if they installed it.
 

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You said you removed your snow blade. If you bought your snow plow new it may have used some of the transaxle fluid to fill the cylinders which raise & angle the blade. I am not sure if the cylinders come filled from the factory or not. At any rate they should not have taken much oil and it should have been rechecked by the dealer if they installed it.
Good call! I'm always amazed at how much my fluid level changes when I remove an implement with a hydraulic cylinder. I always try to store hydraulic implements with the cylinders retracted all the way. It can be a Catch-22 sometimes with these small tractors that have small sumps. If I remove the loader and attach the rear hydraulic blade then the level is low. If I add some oil then when I remove the blade and install the loader it is a tad over full. It's tough to stay somewhere in the middle if you are swapping implements.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Was there ever fluid on the dipstick or did you never check it and assume the dealer did?
I just assumed the dealer did. My fault.

You said you removed your snow blade. If you bought your snow plow new it may have used some of the transaxle fluid to fill the cylinders which raise & angle the blade. I am not sure if the cylinders come filled from the factory or not. At any rate they should not have taken much oil and it should have been rechecked by the dealer if they installed it.
I removed only the blade. I left the Quickhitch attached. No real reason for only removing the blade by itself. I only checked the rear dipstick.

Good call! I'm always amazed at how much my fluid level changes when I remove an implement with a hydraulic cylinder. I always try to store hydraulic implements with the cylinders retracted all the way. It can be a Catch-22 sometimes with these small tractors that have small sumps. If I remove the loader and attach the rear hydraulic blade then the level is low. If I add some oil then when I remove the blade and install the loader it is a tad over full. It's tough to stay somewhere in the middle if you are swapping implements.
This is challenging to me. I have 2 cylinders on my Quickhitch and I left them attached to the machine. Are you saying that if I remove my Quickhitch, my fluid level in my machine may increase? In my mind, if I was to remove my Qucikhitch with 2 cylinders or any implement with hoses or cylinders, the fluid in the lines and cylinders would stay in the lines and cylinders and not go back into the machine, correct? Or am I missing something very basic to "Tractor Ownership 101?"

By the way, if I should be retracting my implements, what position would my blade/Quickhitch be in to be considered retracted?

I appreciate the comments.
 

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Mike, Nope, ya didn't miss anything in Tractor Ownership 101. The oil will stay captive in the cylinders & hoses...maybe minus a few drops when you disconnect them. BUT, it takes less oil to retract a cylinder than to extend one. If your level was checked & correct with all cylinders extended, and you retract your cylinders when you remove an implement, your level will be slightly higher. If the level was checked & correct with the cylinders retracted and you extend the cylinders when you remove an implement, your level will be low. Depending on the number of cylinders, we're probably only talking about a quart of oil, but that WILL show on your level.

I think your dealer screwed up. He should have filled all your lines & cylinders BEFORE delivering the tractor. I hope this explains some things! Bob
 

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This is challenging to me. I have 2 cylinders on my Quickhitch and I left them attached to the machine. Are you saying that if I remove my Quickhitch, my fluid level in my machine may increase? In my mind, if I was to remove my Qucikhitch with 2 cylinders or any implement with hoses or cylinders, the fluid in the lines and cylinders would stay in the lines and cylinders and not go back into the machine, correct? Or am I missing something very basic to "Tractor Ownership 101?"
The fluid level will only increase if you retract both cylinders prior to removing the hoses. Once removed, any remaining fluid stays in the hoses and cylinders.

By the way, if I should be retracting my implements, what position would my blade/Quickhitch be in to be considered retracted?
The quick hitch cylinders will be retracted when you raise the blade and angle to the left. You can verify this by observing that both cylinders have very little if any chrome rod exposed. The primary purpose in retracting cylinders prior to removal is to protect the chrome rod. This is more important for implements stored outside but it's a good habit to get into. BTW - if you have a front-mount snow blower the chute cylinder is retracted when the chute it facing right.
 

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I was going to say the same thing as Jerry.

When attachments ship new they normally are shipped dry. Look at it this way, a quick hitch probably fits several different machines and they may have all different connection points and need different length hoses. Priming them in the factory adds weight and can make a mess. When you first connect them, the air needs to be worked out of the lines and cylinders. While this may not be a lot of oil, the more attachments you have the more that will be drawn out of the system. A quick hitch is one cylinder. Add in blade tilt and you are at two cylinders. Add in a snow blower with Hydraulic chute control and you add a third. It is possible that the dealer forgot to refill after doing setup or they hooked up the hoses and never started the machine to purge out the air from the system. If that is the case it is a Tech messing up. I remember when I first hooked up my FEL that my hydro oil went really low but I expected it since I set it up not the dealer and keep a gallon on hand. That also has 4 cylinders which are a lot bigger than what the quick hitch uses.

As far as the position of the blade. I guess I never thought about that much. If the cylinders are extended, blade down and turned to push snow to the right it would probably be a lower reading than if up all the way and turned to push snow to the left. When you disconnect the lines the fluid is trapped in the system at whatever position it was last in. For me I always center the blade in terms of left/right tilt and in the float position so the blade is down when I turn off the machine to disconnect it.

It is kind of like a guy I was helping with a truck issue a few years back. He called me in a panic because he was working on his brakes and his brake fluid level in the master cylinder was over full and he was stumped as to how that could possibly happen. I asked him what he did. "I changed my brakes". Did you change your rotors with new ones as well? "Yes, how did you know?" The last time you had your brakes done did they turn the rotors? "Yes, how did you know?" New pads + new rotors is going to raise the level in the master cylinder. Suck some out to bring it to the proper level and you should be fine but you might want to seat the brake pads first. Or better yet, you are probably due for a fluid change. Like brakes this is a closed system, you will lose some swapping around hoses but usually not a lot.

If it were me, I would fill it up and note how much it takes to fill. My guess is that it won't be much. Then talk to the dealer. Maybe they can provide some feedback as to will this be an issue or not. If you have to add a gallon your tractor probably wasn't moving very well. If you have to add a pint it probably doesn't matter. Add it slow because it come up pretty quick if you have the same transaxle that I have.
 

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The quick hitch cylinders will be retracted when you raise the blade and angle to the left. You can verify this by observing that both cylinders have very little if any chrome rod exposed. The primary purpose in retracting cylinders prior to removal is to protect the chrome rod. This is more important for implements stored outside but it's a good habit to get into. BTW - if you have a front-mount snow blower the chute cylinder is retracted when the chute it facing right.
That is a good point that it is best (even when stored indoors) to park the implements so the cylinders are fully retracted into the housing. So no silver is showing. If the start to rust, they will damage seals and you will be replacing a cylinder. This isn't always possible. Some equipment must be stored in a partially extended position. For instance my FEL. It needs to be in a certain position to have the parking stand extended.

For those items I like hitting them with some LPS #2. It leaves a film behind that I can wipe off with a rag when I am putting them back in service. For instance my FEL will sit in one of my buildings all winter. I spray it down once removed in the fall. Then wipe down the cylinders in the spring and they are in perfect condition. My primary way of storing though is to retract all of them that I can.
 

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For those what wants to know, the formula to calculate the difference in oz. between retract and extend is:

((Ram diameter(in)/2)**2 x 3.14 x Ram length(in))/1.8

For a 1.5" ram that is 36" long, that works out to be 35+ fluid ounces - just over a quart.

Al
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Update:
I called my dealer and they said come and get a quart of fluid for free. I went and picked up a quart and added it. Still nothing on the dipstick. Called them back and told them about the situation and the parts guy said "let us come get it and get it right." I told him that I did not think them picking it up at this time was necessary. He then said come and get as much fluid as you want. I went back and picked up another quart. Then I came home and read this forum before putting more in the machine. Went out to my shed, retracted both cylinders looked at the dipstick and still nothing on the dipstick. Added some additional fluid and waited and saw some fluid now appearing on the dipstick. Added some more and started my machine like the manual says to do. The fluid is almost to the appropriate (crosshatch marks) level. Because of the comments on this site, I decided that I should retract my cylinders, add fluid to the appropriate level so that I did not have an overfill situation when the cylinders and lines (Quickhitch) are removed in the future.

I put in 60 oz of fluid (yes, 1qt plus 28 oz). Hopefully this will remedy this issue. I don't think I've done any damage to my machine plus I think my dealer has acted responsibly to this issue. As some of you have suggested, this probably was a set-up error or oversight by the dealer and I'm hopeful that's what it is. My dealer did tell me that all of their set-ups are done at another one of their locations and not at this location where I bought mine.

All of the reply's to my post have been very helpful. Thank you!
 

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Update:
I called my dealer and they said come and get a quart of fluid for free. I went and picked up a quart and added it. Still nothing on the dipstick. Called them back and told them about the situation and the parts guy said "let us come get it and get it right." I told him that I did not think them picking it up at this time was necessary. He then said come and get as much fluid as you want. I went back and picked up another quart. Then I came home and read this forum before putting more in the machine. Went out to my shed, retracted both cylinders looked at the dipstick and still nothing on the dipstick. Added some additional fluid and waited and saw some fluid now appearing on the dipstick. Added some more and started my machine like the manual says to do. The fluid is almost to the appropriate (crosshatch marks) level. Because of the comments on this site, I decided that I should retract my cylinders, add fluid to the appropriate level so that I did not have an overfill situation when the cylinders and lines (Quickhitch) are removed in the future.

I put in 60 oz of fluid (yes, 1qt plus 28 oz). Hopefully this will remedy this issue. I don't think I've done any damage to my machine plus I think my dealer has acted responsibly to this issue. As some of you have suggested, this probably was a set-up error or oversight by the dealer and I'm hopeful that's what it is. My dealer did tell me that all of their set-ups are done at another one of their locations and not at this location where I bought mine.

All of the reply's to my post have been very helpful. Thank you!
Just took delivery of a 3046r with 3rd scv and 3 implements that use fluid. Second day after delivery I checked fluid and nothing on the dip,stick. Long story short 1 gallon low. Dealer is replacing the 1 gal of fluid for me. They believe an over site on their part and not refilled while doing the predelivery work. Gotta check them.
 

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When I took delivery of my X738, I checked the fluid after the first hour or so. It was over a QT low. Put it at the correct level and never got any lower after that. My X590 previous was the same way. Definitely a good thing to check. I check all my fluids at least weekly. Usually the oil bi-weekly when I use it a lot. I tend to be a bit OCD.
 

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Unless it's a single acting cylinder the fluid shouldn't drop on an FEL, the double action of the cylinder has fluid on both sides of the piston for down force on the bucket. The only cylinder that would lower the reservoir would be a 3pt cylinder or middle cylinder for a mower deck.
 

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Unless it's a single acting cylinder the fluid shouldn't drop on an FEL, the double action of the cylinder has fluid on both sides of the piston for down force on the bucket. The only cylinder that would lower the reservoir would be a 3pt cylinder or middle cylinder for a mower deck.
The reservoir level on my 2720 definitely drops when I remove the 200CX loader. My sight glass goes from completely covered to 3/4 full. I run it like this over the winter with the front mounted blower. In the spring when I reattach the loader the level returns to normal.

If I top off the reservoir in the winter it is then over full in the spring when I reinstall the loader.

While a double acting cylinder does have fluid on both sides of the piston it is not a 50/50 distribution. There is less fluid on the rod side.
 
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