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Discussion Starter #1
First of all let me make this perfectly clear - I am not a gardener and have never played one on TV either. But here lately, for some strange reason, I have had a hanger'n to try one. So, if I were to try just a little one, just to see how I liked it - what can I still plant with success?
 

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For instant gratitude, I'd plant zucchini and cucumber. They will still put out a good crop even late. If you like pickles, put in about 5 cucumber plants. I can send you an easy canning recipe so you can keep all the cucs you harvest.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I do like pickles and for that matter cucumbers raw with ranch. I can try some of those. I'll get the recipe, assuming I get something to pickle. I'd like three or four items..... two down.
 

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For some quick results, plant some radishes and/or leaf lettuce. Both are easy and you'll have something to eat in 30 days. You can even grow them in containers filled with potting soil. I grow lettuce in flower boxes on my back deck so that it's close to the grill. That way I can pick lettuce while flippin' burgers.

Cukes, squashes and green beans will take a little longer but are easy too.
 

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How critical is it for a garden to be level? The place I want to put it is on a slight slope.
 

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How critical is it for a garden to be level? The place I want to put it is on a slight slope.

Not critical at all. People have been farming on slopes for centuries. It makes it harder to till the soil to get things going but the plants don't care.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Oh, this ain't that much of a slope - probably have to go 20' to get a one foot drop.
 

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That little slope will be no problem. Just need a place with plenty of sunlight and decent soil (no hard clay). If soil needs help, just get a scoop of mushroom mulch and till it in. Always remember, those plants that make fruit and veggies need plenty of water (veggies are mostly water by volume). This year in TN we are not having any problem with that.:laugh:

Good luck and PM me if you need any recipes, gardening help or canning advise.:thumbup1gif:
 

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Potatoes are another one that's hard to go wrong with. I like planting them in tires or barrels, as they grow they need more dirt on top of them. Just add more dirt to the barrel, or another tire to the stack and pile dirt in. When it's time to harvest, just tip the barrel or tire stack over. :good2:
 

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How critical is it for a garden to be level? The place I want to put it is on a slight slope.
The biggest problem will be when watering. You'll want to run a hose at a trickle or use a soaker hose to keep the water from running off of the high end too quickly. Otherwise, not a problem.

I'd definitely go with the zucchini. It is about time to put in tomato plants for the fall garden too. Radishes do not like the heat, so not sure how well they would do this late in your part of OK. Swiss Chard does well, and stays around, even through the winter here. And the more you harvest it, the more it produces. If you like greens, that is a winner. 2-3 plants is all you should need for 1-2 people to enjoy every week. And it needs to be cooked the day it is picked, (you pick the outer leaves, just leaving the inner 3-4 leaves, each time), as it wilts quickly, once picked.

If you like okra, plan to put in a row or two of that next Spring. It likes the heat, but likes to get sprouted good first, before the heat sets in.
 
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I still have a hanker'n to start gardening, just been too dang busy to get to it - water heaters, cutting grass, staining the grandsons big wooden swing-set/fort, oh and that stupid thing we refer to as "my job". Anyway, so as I ponder all of this building a garden, I wonder "composting" does anyone out here do it, is it worth it, do you just have a big pile or do you use one of those spinning drums, ....... :munch:
 

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I have both a spinning drum and a big ol' pile. We use the drum on the patio for kitchen scraps/waste and the pile for grass clippings, leaves, garden waste and chicken/rabbit pewp. Just my opinion but the drums don't work nearly as well as advertised.
 
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316, This is my first year with a garden in a long, long time. I used to have a nice garden when I lived in the suburbs, but a few years ago I retired and moved north.

My garden work started last fall with a plan and some grass and brush cutting. Then a local guy came over to break up the ground with a tiller on the front of a skid steer. This spring, I found a 40 year old, 5hp tiller and kept at it . I used the FEL to haul away the rocks that the tiller unearthed.
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I hauled in 4 pick up loads of some great compost and tilled that in.
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Up here in the north, I have to wait to plant until a few days after Memorial Day to avoid the last frost of the year. So my garden is several weeks behind compared to gardens even 150 miles south. My growing season is almost 5 weeks shorter up here too.

This is how it looks today...
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A small patch, roughly 20' x25'. There's tomatoes, tomatillos, green and jalapeno peppers, onions, rhubarb, dill, snow peas, and zucchini.

This fall, I should take down a few trees that shade the garden early in the day, but it's OK for now.

As far as composting goes, I think good compost one of the best soil amendments for a garden! There is a wonderful privately run compost facility that is a bit of a drive away from me, but their product is worth it. I'll be hauling in more this fall after harvest.

Years ago, I tried the big black plastic box you fill with stuff, but had only marginal success. Now, I cut the grass and leave the clippings on the lawn and toss any kitchen scraps (green, not meat) out in the woods for nature and wildlife to dispose of.

If I can grow this up here in the world of sandy and rocky soil, you should be able to make and grow a very nice garden down there. A little dirt work, some Miracle Grow and water.... A fence to keep out any critters and some cooperative weather is about all you need. Go For It!
 
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I compost. Very little from the kitchen goes into the trash. I have 2 piles, so one is ready to use and the other is collecting scraps, grass clippings, leaves, etc. I really want to try vermiculture, but I'm not sure they would survive in the set up in the Texas summers. I don't think I'd want to move them indoors, although I might be willing to try, if they worked as well as described in some articles I've read.

When I was a kid, we collected the kitchen scraps (all but meat fat), and at the end of the day, the container of scraps was thrown in the garden area. Nothing was really piled, just tossed into the area. 2-3 times a year, dad would just till the peels, husks, rinds, etc. under. Worked fine. I think one of my dogs would try to eat the compost items as soon as they were thrown out, with him being able to get to the garden. So, I just made the heaps, away from the dogs' area.
 
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Discussion Starter #16
So it sounds like a pile is a better way to go than the spinning drum deal. Please don't let the tree huggers know I am talk'n about this stuff.....:laugh:
 

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The Allis-Chalmers sticker has been in the back window for more years than I've had the 1025R....:hide:

I've got the old family A-C "B" in the garage, but I'm undecided if I'll rebuild the engine or sell it to someone as a project.
 

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So it sounds like a pile is a better way to go than the spinning drum deal. Please don't let the tree huggers know I am talk'n about this stuff.....:laugh:
Supposedly, the spinning drum will get the compost ready faster. I think I have too much trimmings from the kitchen for all buy the largest ones of those. And then, the large ones get pricy, and I worry the cylinders would not stand up and retain their shape with a heavy load. Besides, it is free for me to just have a pile or two!
 
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