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[RANT]

Two words: my neighbor, unfortunately I am down grade from him. This is one of my webcams pointed NNW. The north side of the fence line is my neighbor, I'm to the south. I have some jute erosion control mat arriving this week and I've been building rock berms with my grapple.

He has way, way too many sheep, if a blade of grass or weed pops up it's probably eaten immediately. Now that I'm down to just nine antelope my land should start a long recovery process. I just mentioned to Dear Wife that maybe our antelope will run into the fence and break their necks and we can get some whitetails and turkeys back :yahoo: .

This is the same neighbor that didn't bother to trap and dispatch the critters eating the Guinea fowl we shared - 15 of them disappeared over six months. This is the same neighbor that has a big issue with two loose aggressive dogs and his wife was so scared she was afraid to go on walks - on their property. And guess what - the dogs killed two of their lambs and an adult ewe. He finally acquired some cahones and got his rifle and looked for the dogs but they were long gone. He did report the incident to the sheriff (again) and the dog owner paid him $400 for the dead animals.

He told me about the aggressive dogs several months before and I told him to shoot them (with his wife standing there.) He doesn't have a pistol and I was really tempted to offer to sell one of mine I don't use.

I really hate to rant because otherwise they are great neighbors but I think they would be much better off living in a subdivision.

[/RANT]
 

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Soil and Water Conservation district

[RANT]

Two words: my neighbor, unfortunately I am down grade from him. This is one of my webcams pointed NNW. The north side of the fence line is my neighbor, I'm to the south. I have some jute erosion control mat arriving this week and I've been building rock berms with my grapple.

He has way, way too many sheep, if a blade of grass or weed pops up it's probably eaten immediately. Now that I'm down to just nine antelope my land should start a long recovery process. I just mentioned to Dear Wife that maybe our antelope will run into the fence and break their necks and we can get some whitetails and turkeys back :yahoo: .

This is the same neighbor that didn't bother to trap and dispatch the critters eating the Guinea fowl we shared - 15 of them disappeared over six months. This is the same neighbor that has a big issue with two loose aggressive dogs and his wife was so scared she was afraid to go on walks - on their property. And guess what - the dogs killed two of their lambs and an adult ewe. He finally acquired some cahones and got his rifle and looked for the dogs but they were long gone. He did report the incident to the sheriff (again) and the dog owner paid him $400 for the dead animals.

He told me about the aggressive dogs several months before and I told him to shoot them (with his wife standing there.) He doesn't have a pistol and I was really tempted to offer to sell one of mine I don't use.

I really hate to rant because otherwise they are great neighbors but I think they would be much better off living in a subdivision.

[/RANT]
You would do him a favor if you mentioned to your local Soil and Water Conservation District his abuse of the land. If you just tell them he needs some technical help and it's not a compliance issue they probably will just offer to help.

The local Cooperative Extension agent would be an even better bet as they have no enforcement power at all but usually are very willing to help educate those new to country life. It sounds like your neighbor is a great guy, just lacks knowledge. That's fixable. On the other hand, an informed jerk usually can't be fixed.

Treefarmer
 

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That's a good idea. We have very little topsoil on top of limestone rock and it takes a hundred years to create a few inches. I suppose on the bright side, most of his topsoil is now on my property. :cheers:

Years ago I attempted to get him to attend some seminars put on by our extension agent - one of them was about livestock, sheep and goats as I recall. Not interested. My wife asked his wife to volunteer in our little public library - she's worked there for years and enjoys having a job. Not interested.
 

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[RANT]

Two words: my neighbor, unfortunately I am down grade from him. This is one of my webcams pointed NNW. The north side of the fence line is my neighbor, I'm to the south. I have some jute erosion control mat arriving this week and I've been building rock berms with my grapple.
You would do him a favor if you mentioned to your local Soil and Water Conservation District his abuse of the land. If you just tell them he needs some technical help and it's not a compliance issue they probably will just offer to help.

The local Cooperative Extension agent would be an even better bet as they have no enforcement power at all but usually are very willing to help educate those new to country life. It sounds like your neighbor is a great guy, just lacks knowledge. That's fixable. On the other hand, an informed jerk usually can't be fixed.

Treefarmer
Completely agree with Treefarmer's quote about the SWCD, get them involved. Depending on your local agency, some actually do have power (around here they do).

Please be careful building berms, as this is something that could backfire on you. This will depend on local regulations and stormwater requirements. If the water naturally flows onto your property, it can be a lawsuit waiting to happen if you block it and "cause harm" to his property.

It's not a fun situation to be in, as he is causing the increased runoff, but you're getting stuck with it. Good luck and keep us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
With the berms, I'm just attempting to slow down and somewhat divert (actually spread out) the runoff from him. Berm is a too formal word, these are just rows of rock.

There is a fairly large berm/catch basin that was already built when we bought the place. It's on the SW side of the property line and actually prevents a periodic road washout - it's the lowest point on the small chip-seal road for the ranches to the west of me. It's a dead-end road so people could get trapped when we get the occasional frog-strangler rain. I've thought about trying to line it with bentonite to hold water, maybe one of these days.

Ranchers do pretty much what they want to do around here with little oversight.

Well, this was timely - the brown Santa (UPS) just delivered two roll of jute erosion control mat.
 
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