Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,212 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Went to The tumb of Michigan today to see this Octagon Barn. My sister years ago (approx 15 yrs)used to live down the road. They were getting funds to redo it back then as it was in poor shape. She is in town visiting so we took a ride to see it. Wow they did a nice job this thing is huge and really cool. Farm house next to it has had a lot of work done also and had all vintage furniture in it. Was a very cool tour.
 

Attachments

·
Corndog Hater
Joined
·
11,464 Posts
There was an article in Grit or Homestead magazine a while ago about octagon barns. I had never seen or heard of them. Thanks for the pics, that one is mammoth
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,212 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Here's some of the story on it
 

Attachments

·
Chief Stick-picker-upper
Joined
·
10,694 Posts
Thanks for sharing. :good2: I was asking myself, Why a Octagon Barn, and found this.

Besides the fact that Mr. Purdy was taken up by the uniqueness of this shape of barn, it was during this period that the agricultural community was promoting an octagon or round barn as the building of the future for agriculture. It was felt that this shape of building would be handier to work out of and that it would replace three or four buildings on the farm, i.e. hog house, horse barn, grainery, etc.).At this same time Sears Roebuck & Co. listed a number of different sized octagon barn packages in their catalogue. You could order a barn "kit" and it was loaded on a flat car in Chicago and shipped all over the country.It is obvious that if an octagon barn was the building of the future for agriculture there would have been more of them dotting our landscape. In talking to men who worked on the Purdy Farm as boys, they said that it was not as handy to work in and it was a more costly building to build.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
837 Posts
That's a work of art!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,447 Posts
Thanks for sharing. :good2: I was asking myself, Why a Octagon Barn, and found this.

Besides the fact that Mr. Purdy was taken up by the uniqueness of this shape of barn, it was during this period that the agricultural community was promoting an octagon or round barn as the building of the future for agriculture. It was felt that this shape of building would be handier to work out of and that it would replace three or four buildings on the farm, i.e. hog house, horse barn, grainery, etc.).At this same time Sears Roebuck & Co. listed a number of different sized octagon barn packages in their catalogue. You could order a barn "kit" and it was loaded on a flat car in Chicago and shipped all over the country.It is obvious that if an octagon barn was the building of the future for agriculture there would have been more of them dotting our landscape. In talking to men who worked on the Purdy Farm as boys, they said that it was not as handy to work in and it was a more costly building to build.
I thought it was designed by a guy with lots of bad kids and he kept running out of corners.:dunno:
:lol:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,433 Posts
A sphere is the most efficient shape for storing the maximum amount of volume with the least amount of surface area; but unless your storing liquids or gases, they are far from efficient for the needs of people and their things.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top