Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I use off road diesel in my tractor for the most part, but in the winter I usually put 5 gallons of regular pump diesel from the gas station.
My thinking is the regular pump diesel has deicers added and it should not gel up during the cold winter.
What do you do?

Tried to create a POLL, but no luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,339 Posts
Off road year round.
Local station changes it by the season.
#2 in summer, 80/20 by November, straight #1 Jan, back to 80/20 by March(ish), then back to #2.

I run an additive regardless.

Even with straight #1, it's cheaper than the #2 taxable...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I use an additive in all my diesel fuel also, tractor and truck.
I run Promise 409 in the winter, and 405 in the summer.
Never had any issues, so I guess it works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,845 Posts
When I order my off road diesel in the fall, I can specify whatever mix I want of #2 and #1. They tell me the common in winter is 70% #2 and 30% #1. Check your supplier and see what they tell you about your options.

Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,403 Posts
Off-road from the convenient store/gas station year round. I use either John Deere or Stanadyne diesel fuel treatment, also year round. The store is owned by a local fuel company. One of the owners told me that they treat it but I don't know with what. It works. Never had a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
The place near here that sells off-road (dyed) Diesel has pumps for #1 and #2, so I can mix my own. But when I went to get some #1 to be prepared for this cold crap we are getting, the #1 pump was out of commission. Murphy is alive and well. I have some additive to lower the temp before it causes problems. We'll see, possibly tomorrow.

And spring seems to be on back-order.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,545 Posts
Off-road from the convenient store/gas station year round. I use either John Deere or Stanadyne diesel fuel treatment, also year round. The store is owned by a local fuel company. One of the owners told me that they treat it but I don't know with what. It works. Never had a problem.
Dyed diesel year around here too.
FWIW Don, I've never heard of a terminal "treating" dyed diesel simply because it's nothing more and nothing less than #2 heating oil. If your station is owned by a local fuel company and they tell you it's treated, more than likely it's blended with kerosene by them, we do the same thing at two of our stations, and according to JD a 70/30 blend will do no harm to these engines. But additives year around for us also in our tank at home. :good2:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
798 Posts
I use on road diesel that I get at a truck stop about 6 miles away. I treat the fuel year round.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I use on road diesel that I get at a truck stop about 6 miles away. I treat the fuel year round.
I used to use road diesel for the tractor until I found the off road stuff, It's 70 cents to a dollar per gallon cheaper so I use it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,403 Posts
Dyed diesel year around here too.
FWIW Don, I've never heard of a terminal "treating" dyed diesel simply because it's nothing more and nothing less than #2 heating oil. If your station is owned by a local fuel company and they tell you it's treated, more than likely it's blended with kerosene by them, we do the same thing at two of our stations, and according to JD a 70/30 blend will do no harm to these engines. But additives year around for us also in our tank at home. :good2:
They sell some kind of fuel treatment. I can't remember the name of it. He told me that they use that to treat the fuel. I don't know? I think they sell more off road diesel to people who buy it for their furnace than diesel tractors. I'm amazed at the people who buy 10 or 15 gallons at a time. I know damn well they don't have a diesel engine to feed. I don't really understand that, but there are a lot of things I don't understand. I have to agree that it has to be difficult to treat either a truckload or in the storage tank at the station. I'll ask again when I see him. I could care less if they pee in it, as long as it works and doesn't gel. I'm happy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,545 Posts
They sell some kind of fuel treatment. I can't remember the name of it. He told me that they use that to treat the fuel. I don't know? I think they sell more off road diesel to people who buy it for their furnace than diesel tractors. I'm amazed at the people who buy 10 or 15 gallons at a time. I know damn well they don't have a diesel engine to feed. I don't really understand that, but there are a lot of things I don't understand. I have to agree that it has to be difficult to treat either a truckload or in the storage tank at the station. I'll ask again when I see him. I could care less if they pee in it, as long as it works and doesn't gel. I'm happy.
We do too, most gallons sold are for heating.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,483 Posts
I inadvertently take the guess work out of my fuel concerning treated or not.

I buy my fuel once a year in July or August. I have my heating fuel tank filled plus enough in my 150 gallon tank for my tractor. I treat the tractor tank with Stanadyne at delivery and never had an issue.

It is dyed ULSD.

An interesting side note - question for Pat...

This is a new distributor I bought from for the first time this past summer. When I explained the fuel I wanted - and was for both my furnace and tractor - they asked me how old/new my tractor was.

What turned out from that conversation - during the summer they deliver only ULSD (15 PPM). But during the winter they will use LSD (500 PPM) for heating fuel. Of course my tractor is fine with either but I was impressed that they asked. So if I were to buy my heating fuel in the winter I would need a separate delivery for my tractor tank if I needed ULSD.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,339 Posts
I inadvertently take the guess work out of my fuel concerning treated or not.

I buy my fuel once a year in July or August. I have my heating fuel tank filled plus enough in my 150 gallon tank for my tractor. I treat the tractor tank with Stanadyne at delivery and never had an issue.

It is dyed ULSD.

An interesting side note - question for Pat...

This is a new distributor I bought from for the first time this past summer. When I explained the fuel I wanted - and was for both my furnace and tractor - they asked me how old/new my tractor was.

What turned out from that conversation - during the summer they deliver only ULSD (15 PPM). But during the winter they will use LSD (500 PPM) for heating fuel. Of course my tractor is fine with either but I was impressed that they asked. So if I were to buy my heating fuel in the winter I would need a separate delivery for my tractor tank if I needed ULSD.
I'd buy it in the winter just for that reason!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,545 Posts
I inadvertently take the guess work out of my fuel concerning treated or not.

I buy my fuel once a year in July or August. I have my heating fuel tank filled plus enough in my 150 gallon tank for my tractor. I treat the tractor tank with Stanadyne at delivery and never had an issue.

It is dyed ULSD.

An interesting side note - question for Pat...

This is a new distributor I bought from for the first time this past summer. When I explained the fuel I wanted - and was for both my furnace and tractor - they asked me how old/new my tractor was.

What turned out from that conversation - during the summer they deliver only ULSD (15 PPM). But during the winter they will use LSD (500 PPM) for heating fuel. Of course my tractor is fine with either but I was impressed that they asked. So if I were to buy my heating fuel in the winter I would need a separate delivery for my tractor tank if I needed ULSD.
Huh, Penn. hasn't changed that yet, it's 15 ppm year around here. However, to my knowledge 500 ppm can only be sold as heating oil, any type of motor fuel has to be 15 ppm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,339 Posts
Why? I am getting USLD for the price of LSD.

Besides - no truck deliveries in winter here - they won’t be able to get back out of my driveway.
LSD has better lubricity. Your tractor was designed to run on LSD.
ULSD should have an additive put back in to provide the lubricity to get to the specs the fuel system components were designed around.

Kinda like how we used to have leaded and unleaded gas. When leaded went away, a lead additive was required for some vehicles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,483 Posts
Huh, Penn. hasn't changed that yet, it's 15 ppm year around here. However, to my knowledge 500 ppm can only be sold as heating oil, any type of motor fuel has to be 15 ppm.
OK - I get it now - thanks! Now I have learned that they deliver only 15 PPM in the summer. If I ordered for both tanks in the winter I would have to have 2 different deliveries which would incur a delivery charge for the smaller tank as I usually only get around 40 gallons. Buying it all in the summer is so much easier - less confusion of what I am getting.

LSD has better lubricity. Your tractor was designed to run on LSD.
ULSD should have an additive put back in to provide the lubricity to get to the specs the fuel system components were designed around.

Kinda like how we used to have leaded and unleaded gas. When leaded went away, a lead additive was required for some vehicles.
OK - I see your point. But being my tractor is ~12 years old and has no emissions equipment it will be fine with ULSD. I always add the proper dose of Stanadyne Performance Formula to the tractor tank for lubricity purposes plus winter gelling control.

And me just assuming here - the ULSD might run cleaner in my furnace?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,359 Posts
Your furnace won’t know the difference. But your sulphur emissions will be lower. That’s about it.

The additive for your tractor is a very wise move. Stanadyne is one of the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,483 Posts
Your furnace won’t know the difference. But your sulphur emissions will be lower. That’s about it.

The additive for your tractor is a very wise move. Stanadyne is one of the best.
OK - it was just in my mind about the furnace then....

I always used Stanadyne in all my TDI's and tractors - but that was when I was on the road and stopped at a diesel injection place to get it. When I stopped working I had no source and was too cheap to pay UPS for just a bottle or two. But now in the past couple years Tractor Supply has had it thankfully.

What I learned on the TDI forum - if Stanadyne is made in conjunction with Bosch who makes a majority of injection pumps - what is good enough for them is certainly good enough for me.

And I swear - standing next to my TDI when idling I can smell the difference when using the Stanadyne.......or I am just over the edge now with my diesels....
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,359 Posts
Stanadyne is their own fuel injection OEM as well. They are well known in the industry.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top