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Yes. It's the same fuel you get from the pump for your truck. It is just dyed to indicate it was sold without tax, which is the only thing that makes it not for on road use.
 

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That's all I ever use. Been buying it from a small mom and pop country store near our place for over 12 years.
 

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Same stuff, different color, less money. Actually I believe the sticker says ultra low sulfur diesel fuel.
 

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A buddy of mine with a blue tractor says the off road stuff "burns more cheaply." It's all I use.
 

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I use it when I think about buying it; The station nearest me that dispenses it is more than twice the driving distance as the one that sells regular diesel.

Both formulations are low or ultra-low sulfur, the main difference is the presence of dye. I've noticed no discernable performance difference between the two fuel choices,

Brian
 
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I buy 200 gallons of the off road diesel at a time and have it delivered. Red dye and all. The only difference is the red dye to differentiate between off road and on road. You don't want to be caught by the DOT guys with red dye fuel in your on road vehicle. Very expensive.

Dave
 

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I buy 200 gallons of the off road diesel at a time and have it delivered. Red dye and all. The only difference is the red dye to differentiate between off road and on road. You don't want to be caught by the DOT guys with red dye fuel in your on road vehicle. Very expensive.

Dave
Same here. I bought a 300 gallon gravity feed tank and had it filled with 200 gallons of red (offroad) diesel. Makes it so much easier to feed my machines over a jug. They filled it when prices were way down - I think maybe a buck sixty a gallon or something like that.

While they were filling it I had them add Biobor JF which is a biocide.
 

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It's not all created equal.

The only station near me that sells it only has 15% bio fuel.

The supplier that delivers mine says 5% is the standard and he cannot get straight diesel.

Not sure how much, if any difference it makes.

I haven't had any problem with the fuel I get but I run biocide and lubricity additives.

My fuel cost me almost the same as on road from the pump but having it delivered is worth it to me.

I keep a 100 gallons on hand for my diesel generator.
 
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TODAY Off road diesel is the same as on road except for three things:

1. Color (as it is dyed red for identification as off road fuel)
2. Cost (less expensive than on road fuel)
3. Permitted uses (hence the term off road)...

It’s all about the taxes involved. By law all diesel sold in the US today (on AND off road) is now Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD).

Sulfur content in diesel has been regulated from the EPA since 1993. There WAS a period of time where on road and off road DID HAVE the SAME SULFUR content but then beginning primarily in 2006 there was a period of time where there WAS A difference in sulfur content, with on road being mandated to 15 parts per million (PPM) sulfur beginning in 2006 as compared to the then standard of 500 PPM sulfur. Over a period of roughly 8 years this difference was eliminated and by 2014 both on and off road diesel had to meet ULSD standards.

The confusion (and IMHO) and problems from the change to ULSD diesel came from this reduction in sulfur content. I was heavily involved in the off road construction industry during this time period, and there WERE issues with some off road Diesel engines which were designed for a much higher sulfur content than 15 PPM found in ULSD. MANY experts in the field believed that the reduction of sulfur content cause unexpected fuel system issues due to lower lubricity in ULSD. A number of major Diesel engine manufacturers had to create fuel supplements to supposedly combat these issues in their engines.

So there are definitely people out there who believe they experienced a difference in the operation and performance of their off road Diesel engines during the transition period to ULSD.
Please note that Diesel engines manufactured today were designed to run on ULSD, so I’m NOT going to wade into the discussion/argument of whether fuel supplements are needed in today’s off road engines. My experience has been that the discussion quickly devolves into something akin to a “Chevy vs Ford” debate.


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In Minnesota, all No. 2 diesel, dyed or not, must be blended with at least:
  • 5 percent biodiesel from October 1 to March 31
  • 10 percent biodiesel from April 1 to April 14
  • 20 percent biodiesel from April 15 to September 30
No. 1 diesel here doesn’t have a biodiesel requirement.

For diesel storage and fueling, I have a 30 gallon drum on casters with a crank pump. So far, I use my tractor only about 100 hours/year, maybe about 100-120 gallons of diesel. I haul that 30 gallon drum over to the local convenience store in my truck to fill at the pump. I rarely fill that drum. It’s complicated by the fact that this is Minnesota, so I don’t want to get to October with 30 gallons of summer diesel with 20% biodiesel that I can’t use in the increasingly colder temps (due to gel formation), and which will then sit over the winter attracting water and growing bacteria. In the winter, I usually fill from 5 gallon cans because the temp variations require changing percentages of additives and mixture with No.1 diesel (kerosene). In the very coldest temps (-20 to -30) I might be using at least 50-50 kerosene and off-road (along with lubricity and anti-gel additives). My goal is always to get to the fall with that 30 gallon tank with summer-treated fuel empty.
 

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They’re identical fuels. They apply the die to off-road demands in an area. Same fuel. 15 ppm sulfur
 

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Off-road diesel (red dye) = home heating oil. If you want to buy in bulk but can't find a gas station with an off-road pump, call your local heating oil sales. All diesel in the US, including heating oil, is at least "low sulfur". I had almost 500 gallons of heating oil in my tank when my oil furnace crapped out and I switched to a heat pump. I ran the heating oil in my X748 for ten years without any problems.
 

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Off-road diesel (red dye) = home heating oil. If you want to buy in bulk but can't find a gas station with an off-road pump, call your local heating oil sales. All diesel in the US, including heating oil, is at least "low sulfur". I had almost 500 gallons of heating oil in my tank when my oil furnace crapped out and I switched to a heat pump. I ran the heating oil in my X748 for ten years without any problems.
Folks around here line up with their jerry cans at the dyed diesel pumps in the Fall to fill up their home heating tanks. I've been told that the dyed diesel is a LOT cheaper than having heating oil delivered to their homes.
 

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Folks around here line up with their jerry cans at the dyed diesel pumps in the Fall to fill up their home heating tanks. I've been told that the dyed diesel is a LOT cheaper than having heating oil delivered to their homes.
Maybe the heating oil dealers charge a delivery fee? Mine did, too for quantities less than 150 gallons, but if I filled my tank (550 gallon, usually had about 75-100 gallons in it when I'd have it filled), there was no delivery fee. Right now, a station about a mile from me has an untaxed diesel pump and it's usually $.40-.45/gallon less than taxed fuel.
 

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Apparently the delivery fee is quite expensive. I'm afraid I don't know first hand exactly how expensive, I heat with wood, but judging from the number of people lining up with their jerry cans it must be worth their while to buy fuel that way.
 

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Most tractors should be able to do off road. Mine does of course but most tractors are known for off road works. Driving through mud and such that a regular car wouldn't be able to. Don't forget to clean your tractor if you do get a lot of mud on it. Better operation and less engine problems will occur on you.
 

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Most tractors should be able to do off road. Mine does of course but most tractors are known for off road works. Driving through mud and such that a regular car wouldn't be able to. Don't forget to clean your tractor if you do get a lot of mud on it. Better operation and less engine problems will occur on you.
I think you are running low on coffee.
 

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Think off road is same specs as on road except for the dye. However, the one time I bought off road, I had troubles with wax coming out of solution and plugging the outlet of the fuel tank. Took it back to Exxon, and they refunded my money: just poured it back into their tank.

Ralph
 
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