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Discussion Starter #1
I am replacing the stator generator on the yamaha rhino 660. I spent the day getting to it (it is inside of the starter clutch and behind the water pump). I was unbolting a wire holder that had two Allen wrench screws. Apparently, they was baked in and the heads sheared off. Now there are two bolts baked into the starter clutch/ water pump cover. The rhino is an 04 660. I really want this thing fixed this a big kick in the a$$. Any ideas on getting them out other than drilling?

Thanks, guys

John
 

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I've always had great luck with left-hand drill bits, often the heat and friction from drilling will turn them right out.
 

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I've always had great luck with left-hand drill bits, often the heat and friction from drilling will turn them right out.
Ken,

Thanks for the info. I will try to get a left hand bit today. I was gonna turn it on the drillpress, but I guess I'll have to use the hand power drill. Any advice?

Thanks a lot!!

John

Ps. Ill try to post pictures if I can.
 

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I am replacing the stator generator on the yamaha rhino 660. I spent the day getting to it (it is inside of the starter clutch and behind the water pump). I was unbolting a wire holder that had two Allen wrench screws. Apparently, they was baked in and the heads sheared off. Now there are two bolts baked into the starter clutch/ water pump cover. The rhino is an 04 660. I really want this thing fixed this a big kick in the a$$. Any ideas on getting them out other than drilling?

Thanks, guys

John
I have seen beeswax work really well getting stuck/rusted and broken bolts out. 'course you have to heat it a bit for the wax to get in. I know it works really well with exhaust manifold bolts. Then the left hand drill and easy out. Just don't break the easy out off in it.... then you will have a mess.
Good Luck:gaah:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If the bolts are big enough, weld a nut to what is left of the bolt. Worked slick on the aluminum head on my 2500hd.
Thanks for the info. But, unfortunately, 1) the bolt broke off flat with the part, and. 2) I don't know how to weld:thumbsdown:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have seen beeswax work really well getting stuck/rusted and broken bolts out. 'course you have to heat it a bit for the wax to get in. I know it works really well with exhaust manifold bolts. Then the left hand drill and easy out. Just don't break the easy out off in it.... then you will have a mess.
Good Luck:gaah:
I'm not sure, but I think the bolt is baked in there... Will what you said still work?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Got an extractor and new bolts today. Will try to get it done tomorrow or this weekend. Will post pics and updates
 

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I've always had great luck with left-hand drill bits, often the heat and friction from drilling will turn them right out.
Same here. Left handed drill bits. Use a good grade bit and make sure you start it with an accurately placed center punch.


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There are tons of different ways to remove broken bolts, and the best method depends entirely on the exact situation. I got called on to do a lot of them in my previous job, and often times a left handed/ reverse drill bit was all it took to walk the broken piece out. Some picture of what you're dealing with would go a long way toward helping us help you. Removing a broken 3/8" bolt can be far different than removing a broken 1/8" bolt. A set of short extractors can be worth their weight in gold sometimes, but beware of generic "easy outs". If one of those breaks off in the broken bolt, you've entered a whole new world of difficulty. :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
There are tons of different ways to remove broken bolts, and the best method depends entirely on the exact situation. I got called on to do a lot of them in my previous job, and often times a left handed/ reverse drill bit was all it took to walk the broken piece out. Some picture of what you're dealing with would go a long way toward helping us help you. Removing a broken 3/8" bolt can be far different than removing a broken 1/8" bolt. A set of short extractors can be worth their weight in gold sometimes, but beware of generic "easy outs". If one of those breaks off in the broken bolt, you've entered a whole new world of difficulty. :laugh:
O [email protected], you scared me..

Btw, I'm dealing with 3/16" bolts here

Thanks everyone for the help. It is very greatly appreciated!!

John
 

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I'm not sure, but I think the bolt is baked in there... Will what you said still work?
At this point you don't have anything to lose. I'd think if it is baked in that if you heat it and things expand a little the beeswax will work in the threads by capilliary action and provide the lubrication to get em out. Just my thoughts of what I'd try if if were my project. My experiences using bees wax have been very positive. Just make sure it is beeswax, not candle wax or anything like that. Don't know why, but it does work.
Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #14
here...
 

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Okay, that's nowhere near as bad as what I expected. :good2:

First thing to do is get the top of the broken bolts as flat as you can. That's tricky if they're broken off below the surrounding surface, but you need to be able to center punch them as close to the exact center as you can. You'll use the center punch divot to start your small drill bit, and if your mark isn't properly centered then as you increase the size of your drill bits then your hole will be off to one side and can eat into the threads in the part. Centered is key here.

Once you center punch, I would probably heat them. That looks like an aluminum housing and steel bolts, they may be stuck due to corrosion. Heat the part that the bolt is broken off in. A propane torch alone may not be enough to get the job done, you may want to use Mapp gas or an oxy/ acetylene torch. Be very careful if you use an oxy/ fuel torch setup though, because unlike steel aluminum will not change color as it gets hot and you can very quickly go too far and melt it.

Once you've center punched it and got some heat on it, I would start drilling it out with left handed drill bits. I would start with something pretty small, making sure to keep it centered and straight. If you can, drill all the way through the bolt. That will give it room to compress a little and relieve some tension. Work up in drill bit sizes, if it hasn't come out (again, left handed drill bits are the best here) on it's own by the time you get to approximately 1/8" drill bit I'd stop and get some short extractors. I'll check my chart when I'm in the shop and see if I can find an exact size, but 1/8" feel about right. I have a set like this that are my go-to. They grip well, and since they're short you're far less likely to break or twist one off. I've seen them at Lowes, and Amazon carries them as well. That should turn them out.

If it doesn't, you can try using a small punch or chisel to collapse the thin walls of the drilled out bolt and remove it in pieces. That can be tricky because it could break off partially, but leave you with some broken bolt even deeper in the hole. If you had a welder, it looks like you could also be successful by putting a nut on top of the broken bolt and welding through the center. I know that isn't an option right now, but it's just another way to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I was talking to the guys at my great local hardware store, and they asked what I was doing with a left hand bit. When I told them, they said, no, don't use that, use an extractor. So I got a screw extractor. I will try to get er done later today.

John

Ps. Pics to come
 

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I was talking to the guys at my great local hardware store, and they asked what I was doing with a left hand bit. When I told them, they said, no, don't use that, use an extractor. So I got a screw extractor. I will try to get er done later today.

John

Ps. Pics to come
The left rotation bit often works as well if not better than an extractor. You have to drill a hole, the extractor doesn't care if a right or left rotation bit was used and often times the left rotation drill bit will back the screw right out as you drill.

I don't know why you wouldn't use a left rotation bit, worse case, you still use the extractor, best case, you don't need the extractor.
 

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I once snapped off two hard steel registration pins when I was taking apart my drill press to install a riser block. I spent 3 days trying to get those pins out. I finally gave up and took the parts to the machine shop. The guy looked at it and said he'd have them out in less than five minutes. He drilled holes on the back side through the soft cast iron. He then put a small metal rod in the holes an popped them out from the back. He told me to plug the holes with epoxy if I wanted.

I'm not saying that approach would work for this problem, but sometimes coming at something from the rear is better.
 
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