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I had 10 yards of black dirt that I had to move around as part of my yard rehab project. Yesterday, I noted that a full bucket of dirt made that 1023E really squirrely driving across the yard. So first thing this morning after I got home from work, I put the brand new ballast box (that I bought because everyone here on GTT kept talking about how important they are) on the iMatch and took it back to the corner where I have a nice pile of pea rock....shoveled it into the BB and the drove over to where my son had delivered the dirt. This was the maiden voyage of the ballast box. I confess...although I intellectually understood the concept of ballast on these tractors, I'm a total noob at tractors and I was shocked at the difference that that ballast made in the handling and the safety of that little 1023E. Today I moved about 7 yards if dirt and it went perfectly (and safely).

 

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YES someone finally listened to what we told them .... :laugh:

Glad to hear , all is safe.


As you said using ballast makes a world of difference, plus it saves your tractor , and possibly you if tractor rolls on its side.
 

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The important thing is not how you learn, but that you learn. Good work.

For me I wish for some scales so I can figure the correct ballast accurately. Just call me OCD.
 

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Should feel a big difference in ability to penetrate the pile with the front bucket with ballast as well.
These little machines sure make the yard chores a lot easier eh?
 

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Should feel a big difference in ability to penetrate the pile with the front bucket with ballast as well.
These little machines sure make the yard chores a lot easier eh?
Y'know....now that you mention, I did see that. The buckets today were noticeably fuller. I thought it was because I was just getting better, but I think you're right.
 

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... I intellectually understood the concept of ballast on these tractors, I'm a total noob at tractors and I was shocked at the difference that that ballast made in the handling and the safety of that little 1023E. ...
I know what you mean, sometimes it just takes a little real world experience to have the "a ha" moment that convinces you of what you already know, and then it becomes part of you.

I'm an engineer, I understand *intellectually* the importance of ballast, statics and dynamics, etc., but that doesn't mean that I won't push the envelope a bit until that epiphany occurs. Last year I was unloading a rear finish mower from my truck without ballast (it was just a quick move after all), all was fine until I decided to get off and push the load a little sideways to "balance" it on the forks and nearly tipped the whole thing over! I still didn't learn my lesson and proceeded to move it to the backyard, still without ballast, and the rear tires were spinning, I had to use the diff lock just to move on level ground! -- OK, I got it. The laws of physics aren't suspended just because I'm in a hurry. I now go through the trouble of ballasting each and every time. Much safer, and more satisfying.
 

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Should be written on the wall somewhere

I know what you mean, sometimes it just takes a little real world experience to have the "a ha" moment that convinces you of what you already know, and then it becomes part of you.

I'm an engineer, I understand *intellectually* the importance of ballast, statics and dynamics, etc., but that doesn't mean that I won't push the envelope a bit until that epiphany occurs. Last year I was unloading a rear finish mower from my truck without ballast (it was just a quick move after all), all was fine until I decided to get off and push the load a little sideways to "balance" it on the forks and nearly tipped the whole thing over! I still didn't learn my lesson and proceeded to move it to the backyard, still without ballast, and the rear tires were spinning, I had to use the diff lock just to move on level ground! -- OK, I got it. The laws of physics aren't suspended just because I'm in a hurry. I now go through the trouble of ballasting each and every time. Much safer, and more satisfying.
"The laws of physics aren't suspended just because I'm in a hurry" should be on a sticker on tractors, in the manual and written on the wall of tractor storage. It's just a perfect reminder to us all.

Thank you.

Treefarmer
 

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A tractor has no suspension like a car or truck, so front axle has a pivot point in the center to allow the front tires to move up and down and all four wheels to stay on the ground as you go over slightly uneven terrain. That pivot means the rear tires are almost solely responsible to maintain side to side stability.

The heavier you load the loader bucket, the more weight you put on the front tires but take off of the rear tires. That can leave the tractor kinda balancing on the front axle, both front to rear but more importantly side to side on that pivot point. The higher you lift the heavy loader bucket, the more that few inches of pivot becomes amplified, a few inches of pivot down at the frame can become a couple feet of side to side motion on the raised loader bucket. It's literally a recipe for instability.

Rear ballast is VERY important when using a loader.
 

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The laws of physics aren't suspended just because I'm in a hurry.
Perfect!

"The laws of physics aren't suspended just because I'm in a hurry" should be on a sticker on tractors, in the manual and written on the wall of tractor storage. It's just a perfect reminder to us all.
Yes, along with this sticker:
 

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Of course tipping is a major concern as it can be fatal however there are other things to consider.

What is the load rating for your front axle? As you take load off the front wheels it all shifts to the front axle which is weaker as it needs to be able to steer the tractor. You can break the front axle if overloaded.

Be sure to use 4wd when using the FEL. The reason is you don't have front wheel brakes on a tractor like these. The braking is done in the transmission and if in 2wd that means only brakes on the rear wheels. If the rear wheels lose traction because not enough weight on them, you brake anymore. You also may not be able to steer. My father has an old Case tractor with a FEL that is 2wd only. Even with fluid filled tires I have picked up a log that caused it to balance perfectly like a teeter totter. The scary part was I was on a hill facing down hill. I started to go down the hill, I couldn't stop it, I couldn't steer it. I was just along for the ride. The only thing I could do was slowly start to lower the load so it would drag on the ground and slow me down. The good news was it was a very gradual slope and not a steep hill. The 4wd thing can be an issue when operating on hard ground like an asphalt or cement driveway. Binding up the 4wd can be an issue but you also need to maintain control. So I normally try and only drive/turn on flat ground and I will disable 4wd when doing so. If on any kind of grade it is in 4wd.
 

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Most people learn via experience.

"Tell me, I'll forget. Show me, I'll remember. Involve me, I'll understand"

"Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgment!"

"Experience is something you get right after you need it!"
 

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Being smart is learning from your mistakes. Being wise is learning from others mistakes.
 

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Most people learn via experience.

"Tell me, I'll forget. Show me, I'll remember. Involve me, I'll understand"

"Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgment!"

"Experience is something you get right after you need it!"
Good post
 

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Being smart is learning from your mistakes. Being wise is learning from others mistakes.
Had a boss used to tell me make your mistakes with other people’s money


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OK I’ll bite. I’ve been keenly observing this ballast thing and have thought “Oh I’ll get the feel of the thing and be able to figure what I need for ballast if any” being experienced and all that know it all crap operators throw at ya. Although I inflated the fronts to max pressure, and can cruise around with a loaded bucket of dirt, Feeling confident I’m not going to pull a rookie move and dump it on its side, it’s the front axle loading up that I’m realizing isn’t healthy for it. Although enslaving the rear end by throwing weight on it didn’t seem very nice, I’m realizing that the front axle being overloaded is worse. I’m at the point where I can continue with only a rear blade and liquid filled tires, and tear into a task, but now I think I’m going to slow my roll, and get working on some counterweight options today. I have a welder and about 1500 lbs of rebar scrounged from job sites, an I match, and a thick skull. I will bow to the counterweight lords and get 600 lbs on my rear before grenading my front end.


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due to a couple of posts here i have a question

please explain the physics to me as to how adding ballast to the rear reduces any load at all on the frount axle when using the FEL


i fully agree and understand ballast provides stability to the tractor by securing 4 pts of contact to the ground and i fully embrance the use of ballast....in my mind the ballast in fact allows the FEL to carry more weight thus allowing more load on the frount axle not reducing it.......its been my experience that front axle problems usually result from bouncing loads that add a dynamic load to a already heavy static load and the dynamic loads would also be increased by the use of ballast
 

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due to a couple of posts here i have a question

please explain the physics to me as to how adding ballast to the rear reduces any load at all on the frount axle when using the FEL


i fully agree and understand ballast provides stability to the tractor by securing 4 pts of contact to the ground and i fully embrance the use of ballast....in my mind the ballast in fact allows the FEL to carry more weight thus allowing more load on the frount axle not reducing it.......its been my experience that front axle problems usually result from bouncing loads that add a dynamic load to a already heavy static load and the dynamic loads would also be increased by the use of ballast
Someone correct me if I'm wrong. I thought the rear axle acts like a fulcrum when using the loader. Putting enough weight on the back eases the load on the front axle is what I thought happens.
 

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Scroll up to Kenny’s link. Looks like he’s got it all covered there


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