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My first post was about heat now I have a concrete question
The concrete was poured 15 yrs ago +/- so is it worth painting ? Will it help seal and control dust and make it easier to keep clean
 

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It will take some acid etching and scrub to get the pours clean enough to hold paint. The epoxy paint out there holds up well but it really depends on if it is a garage or a shop. If you machining, welding, grinding or other fab work I would/did just stick with concrete. But yes if you paint it and keep it nice dust and clean up are much nicer.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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Google staining cement that might be a better option for a shop.
 

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Is the concrete smooth or a rougher brushed finish? If smooth then I don't think paint/expoxy really help with the overall dust control and sweep up but they will make the surface slicker and may make you more prone to slipping and perhaps falling. If it's a brushed finish then epoxy/paint may help but the real fix would be to grind/polish the surface till it's smoother then epoxy/paint. Overall I prefer a smooth troweled or screeded surface much better than epoxy coated or brushed. In my experience if you keep your floor reasonably clean and don't let spilled dropped oil build up and spread then a smooth, bare concrete surface is just fine.
 

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Google staining cement that might be a better option for a shop.
Did someone post pics of my shop floor on google, or something?

Just use the joint - the stains come naturally... :tongue:


I asked my concrete guy about epoxy vs sealer back when the slab was poured. His opinion was that sealer worked better to prevent moisture passing through, and epoxy needed an absolutely clean and etched surface to bond with, but it still tended to flake and stain over time; plus if you scratched it or burned it (welding spatter, plasma cutting, etc), it looked like butt and you'd end up needing to re-do the whole thing since the epoxy doesn't stick to itself all that well or color match when touched up.

Another problem with epoxy is that even with sand or rubber flakes, it's greased lightning under your feet if you spill any oil or coolant on it. Sure, you'll need acid to get the stain from that same spill out of your non-epoxied floor, but no one ever needed stitches or a cast from an ugly (or "seasoned" :mocking: ) concrete floor.
 

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You might want to look into polishing the floor. I’ve seen this done in industrial and commercial applications , seems to hold up much better than epoxy coatings. What they do is grind the concrete with floor polishing equipment leaving nice shiny surface. It makes an old floor look like new . You may be able to rent the equipment and do it yourself or have a contractor do it.
 

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I've sealed and / or epoxy coated garage floors over the years. Even with the best preparation I've been disappointed. The sealer ultimately failed and began flaking which turned into a mess. The epoxy was slick and had some adhesion problems in a few areas. Again, let me stress the fact that preparation was proper and thorough and installation was correct. I used the best materials available.

The most impressive experience I had with a garage floor was at my first home and an existing basement and garage slab. Back in the late '70's.

Before moving in I used an industrial floor scrubber to clean the concrete. Using water and detergent I went over the entire surface a few times and then rinsed it thoroughly. I used a wet vacuum to thoroughly remove the rinse water Let it dry for about a week and then put down a couple of coats of Rhyolite Industrial Floor Paint which was recommended at the time but is no longer available. I don't recall whether it was an oil or water based product but it was tough and wasn't slick. I owned that place for almost 25 years and the floors looked great when I eventually sold the property. Even the garage that got the most use.
 

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I used this on my 30x40 shop I built when I lived in Texas. Epoxy Coatings For Concrete Floors | Commercial Kitchen Flooring | Dura Poxy Epoxy Warehouse Floor Paint I bought the durall 400.

You do need to clean the floor REALLY well and etch it. You might be challenged if it is an older floor with some oil/grease stains. If applied correctly this stuff will not come up. It is NOT cheap but the results are really nice. The only issue I had with it is that while it made things easy to roll on it, it also made it hard to really set your feet and push on anything that you need to slide across the floor. I never slipped on it though. If I still have any semblance of a budget when I get to this point, I will use it again on the shop I am building.

If you already have some deep oil stains then you might just consider leaving the floor as is. Also consider the fact you will need to empty your shop of everything that is in it for a few days in order to clean/prep/apply the product (whatever product you choose). I know for me once I set my junk inside a shop, I am done dealing with the floor. That's why my garage floor isn't painted. I was in a bit of a hurry move into my house last January so I simply let that modification go.
 
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