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Discussion Starter #1
My new (to me) daily driver 01 F350 isn't really all that old, but the dash lights were pretty crappy when I got it. The one over the tach was burned out, the one over the oil pressure and volt gauge was very tired, and the others weren't much to write home about either.

So I bought what ended up being about $10 in 194LL bulbs and tore into it tonight. Holy Smokes what a difference! :good2:

Next up is replacing the chalked out headlights with some new ones in the more cooler '05 style. The problem is my lenses came with the bulbs and the bulbs don't fit my harness. :banghead: I found one H13 plug last night, but my signal needs a different plug too and those might be harder to come by. Still need to chop up the header to make the reflectors fit too, but that shouldn't take long. I didn't want to do that in the dark (so I installed my dvd player instead :gizmo: ).

This is what I'm doing to the headlights: http://www.riffraffdiesel.com/content/RESOURCES/Riffraff_Diesel_05-07_Headlight_Instructions.pdf

I just have the regular chromey ones, I don't care for the Harley black outlines. Should be a nice improvement once I get it done. :) The one-piece looks a lot better to me. The ones it came with look cobbled with all the different edges that don't quite line up right.

Speaking of cobbled - when I pulled the passenger light assembly off, I found a jerry rigged connection between the factory harness and the signal light; complete with a zip tie holding two butchered connectors together. :thumbsdown: The joys of buying used stuff... Never know when you'll find a surprise. :mocking:
 

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I can only imagine how many vehicles have never had a transmission flush, or check the rear-end grease level, or even pull the driveshaft to check U-joints and grease the splines.
And, don't forget to change out your vehicle cabin air filter after the pollen season is over.
 

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And, don't forget to change out your vehicle cabin air filter after the pollen season is over.
Or maybe before. Forgot about my Subaru having one. Decided to get a new one. Here's what I found on the old one after 130K miles:

003.jpg
New one:

31AMgBfjWxL.jpg
 

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One thing I find lacking with maintenance on older vehicles are the doors - hinges, latches, and weather seal. I cringe when so many times you hear someone open their door and it squeaks/grinds. And the weather seal never seems to get any attention. At least a couple times a year when I am doing the plastic parts on my truck with 303 I make sure I do all the door seals.
 

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Bought an 03 F250 in October.

Replaced both front hub assys
Flushed and replaced power steering fluid
Pulled driveshaft, lubed slip joint, checked u-joints
New brakes and rotors all around
Freed up and replaced all caliper pins and boots (several pins were locked up)
Replaced 1 caliper that would occasionally lock up
Freed up parking brake assys
Replaced master cylinder
Changed differential fluid
New ujoints in front axle
Replaced lock-out hubs
Replaced rear leaf springs
New shocks all around
New tires
New plugs and COPs
Replaced steering stabilizer

BTW, get under the rear and check the bed supports - most have rust damage.

Still have a few things to do this spring.
 

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Shocks and rear end u-bolts for the leaf springs I took off my 96 Silverado

IMG_1365.jpg
 

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Just hit them with a wire brush and some paint..


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The wire brush probably would have done them in. A couple of them sounded like a gun going off when I tried to loosen them and they snapped in two.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The carrier bearing was a little noisy, so I got a new one and 3 u-joints figuring I was that far into it I might as well freshen them up - they're already heavy duty and still tight. Bearing was shot, but not to the point of being sloppy - new one solved the vibration I could feel in the floor.

Transmissions are something you either flush on schedule from the start and keep doing it, or leave well enough alone if you didn't. There's so much debris in the pan from the clutches breaking down/wearing over time, you have a good chance of screwing up what isn't broken if you flush one that hasn't ever been flushed. Fluid in my transmission looks as good or better than any vehicle I've had which wasn't rebuilt in my ownership (I've only needed one tranny so far, and that was behind an engine I rebuilt to make a little less than 400hp. Tranny didn't last the 500 miles of break in :laugh: )

The brakes on this truck are recent, but not new. The pins all slid nicely, but there was a pad that was hanging up because the tabs that fit the bracket were too thick (I've seen that a lot in recent years - dull dies or something), so I ground that down and all is well.

The frame on this truck is the best part of it. There's minimal rust on anything below the sheet metal. The body is pretty good too, but has some areas that will probably need to be addressed to keep up with it so it's not a salt-belt cancer victim. That the paint is monotone red is nice - I can touch it up better than if it were a metallic.
 

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I can only imagine how many vehicles have never had a transmission flush, or check the rear-end grease level, or even pull the driveshaft to check U-joints and grease the splines.
And, don't forget to change out your vehicle cabin air filter after the pollen season is over.
Truer words have never been spoken. I will be the first to admit that I didn't even know there WAS a vehicle cabin air filter until the great folks at the local garage pointed it out to me. This was after having the car for a few years so needless to say, the filter was in pretty bad shape - there were such pretty colors of mold if I recall .

I am not an organized person by nature, I guess it just isn't in my DNA, so I find constant routine maintenance on things to be overwhelming. I feel I am always playing catch up and putting out fires after they have happened. If somebody has a tried and true system for maintenance I am all ears! :flag_of_truce:
 

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If somebody has a tried and true system for maintenance I am all ears! :flag_of_truce:
Just follow the maintenance guide in your manual. My Fords have a seperate book for just maintenance and tell you at which intervals to perform them along with a place to record the date and mileage.
 

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I can only imagine how many vehicles have never had a transmission flush, or check the rear-end grease level, or even pull the driveshaft to check U-joints and grease the splines.
And, don't forget to change out your vehicle cabin air filter after the pollen season is over.
Transmissions are something you either flush on schedule from the start and keep doing it, or leave well enough alone if you didn't. There's so much debris in the pan from the clutches breaking down/wearing over time, you have a good chance of screwing up what isn't broken if you flush one that hasn't ever been flushed. Fluid in my transmission looks as good or better than any vehicle I've had which wasn't rebuilt in my ownership (I've only needed one tranny so far, and that was behind an engine I rebuilt to make a little less than 400hp. Tranny didn't last the 500 miles of break in :laugh: )

The brakes on this truck are recent, but not new. The pins all slid nicely, but there was a pad that was hanging up because the tabs that fit the bracket were too thick (I've seen that a lot in recent years - dull dies or something), so I ground that down and all is well.
On the transmissions... if the service intervals haven't been followed, it shouldn't be "flushed". It should however, still be drained and refilled. The problem with flushing is when auto shops use their machine, the pressure will knock loose all the deposits. Those deposits often find their way to somewhere they shouldn't be and cause a failure.

Lesser known service - Brake fluid should be flushed every 2-3 years. Just did my Jetta a month ago. A power bleeder make it a snap. Pressure is much better than vacuum.
 

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Not going out and get my Honda manual out ,but either the dealer or the manual or both, advised to never have a Honda transmission FLUSHED

Was told if I did more than likely the transmission would go out in less than 5000 miles.

As for cabin air filters,, delivering parts , I have seen some very nasty ones over the years. Mice , chipmunks ,ground squirrels nest of nuts, parts of blankets, rags, items found from in a garage or from outside .
Nephew complained to his dealer that the air cond wasn't working properly and he needed it checked. Service manager asked him if cabin filter had ever been replaced,, what cabin filter. Nephew replaced cabin filter ,,guess what worked like it did when it was new.

Just like your home furnace filter, if it is dirty ,doesn't clean the air and less air flow.
 

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Transmissions are something you either flush on schedule from the start and keep doing it, or leave well enough alone if you didn't.
Excellent advice.
I bought a 83 Celebrity back in the day that had sat for a long time and I had the garage do some work on it. When I told the manager to flush the tranny he said no for the reason you mentioned. Problem was that the pan gasket was leaking on it and afterwards less than 300 miles later the tranny puked.
 

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My F150 is a testament to the power of both routine and preventative maintenance. I have kept it on the road for nearly double the miles that Ford said it should be able to go simply by following the recommended service intervals and not skimping out on the details. The only time my truck has ever left me walking was when a sparrow punched a nice little hole in the radiator.

Here is the plan I have been following with my truck for almost 14 years and the last 300,000 out of 520,000 miles:
By-weekly or before leaving on a trip longer than 100 miles: check all lights, fluid levels, and tire pressures.
Every 3,000 miles: coolant test, oil change, battery test, grease all zerks on front end and u-joints, lube door pins and latches, and a tire rotation.
Every June: re-pack front wheel bearings, clean carb, new air filter, new wiper blades, alternator test, drain and refill transmission, re-torque gooseneck and trailer hitch bolts, and a thorough cleaning.
Every other June in addition to normal June service: drain and refill both axles and transfer case, grease slip yokes, flush brakes and power steering systems, and replace fuel filter.

Always use quality parts and lubricants, especially with a truck which is going to be working hard.

:kidw_truck_smiley:
 

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Lesser known service - Brake fluid should be flushed every 2-3 years. Just did my Jetta a month ago. A power bleeder make it a snap. Pressure is much better than vacuum.
The power bleeder works great! I never paid any attention with a brake fluid change until I started owning and working on my TDI's. I just don't understand why the American auto makers don't address this in the maintenance schedules. Same goes with a power steering fluid change - no mention of it.

My F150 is a testament to the power of both routine and preventative maintenance. I have kept it on the road for nearly double the miles that Ford said it should be able to go simply by following the recommended service intervals and not skimping out on the details. The only time my truck has ever left me walking was when a sparrow punched a nice little hole in the radiator.

Here is the plan I have been following with my truck for almost 14 years and the last 300,000 out of 520,000 miles:
By-weekly or before leaving on a trip longer than 100 miles: check all lights, fluid levels, and tire pressures.
Every 3,000 miles: coolant test, oil change, battery test, grease all zerks on front end and u-joints, lube door pins and latches, and a tire rotation.
Every June: re-pack front wheel bearings, clean carb, new air filter, new wiper blades, alternator test, drain and refill transmission, re-torque gooseneck and trailer hitch bolts, and a thorough cleaning.
Every other June in addition to normal June service: drain and refill both axles and transfer case, grease slip yokes, flush brakes and power steering systems, and replace fuel filter.

Always use quality parts and lubricants, especially with a truck which is going to be working hard.

:kidw_truck_smiley:
That is something to be proud of. I am on a mission of sorts to make my current truck last as long as I can. I know I will never be able to afford such a high end luxury truck ever again so I am doing everything in my power to make it last. I have more problems due to rust/corrosion because it sits all the time for the past few years - lucky if I put 5k miles on it a year now.

One thing that bothers me is the transmission maintenance interval of 150k miles. I always tend to believe the engineers that build my truck and trust their recommended maintenance schedule. But that 150k on the transmission makes me nervous - especially guessing a re-manufactured transmission for this truck will like be north of $5k. So what I am going to do is convert items like that to time served so to speak. I'm pretty sure an average vehicle is driven 12k miles per year (?). So at the 150k mile mark it should be around 12 years - still seems a bit of a long time before a fluid/filter change.

Oil gets changed every 6 months no matter the mileage as I only get about 2500 miles on it in 6 months. Manual calls for 7500 miles or 6 months.

And being I can't work on it myself anymore I have been using Ford's "The Works" service package every 6 months. This includes the oil/filter change, rotating the tires, and a bunch of other visual checks including a battery load test. This makes me feel more comfortable as I can't even get underneath my truck anymore. The cost is only a couple bucks more than just an oil/filter change and well worth it to me.

This thread has been a good one for me. Even though my truck is only 7 years old, like I said I am going to try for this to be my last truck. The little hints posted on what to look for are very helpful.
 

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The power bleeder works great! I never paid any attention with a brake fluid change until I started owning and working on my TDI's. I just don't understand why the American auto makers don't address this in the maintenance schedules. Same goes with a power steering fluid change - no mention of it.



That is something to be proud of. I am on a mission of sorts to make my current truck last as long as I can. I know I will never be able to afford such a high end luxury truck ever again so I am doing everything in my power to make it last. I have more problems due to rust/corrosion because it sits all the time for the past few years - lucky if I put 5k miles on it a year now.

One thing that bothers me is the transmission maintenance interval of 150k miles. I always tend to believe the engineers that build my truck and trust their recommended maintenance schedule. But that 150k on the transmission makes me nervous - especially guessing a re-manufactured transmission for this truck will like be north of $5k. So what I am going to do is convert items like that to time served so to speak. I'm pretty sure an average vehicle is driven 12k miles per year (?). So at the 150k mile mark it should be around 12 years - still seems a bit of a long time before a fluid/filter change.

Oil gets changed every 6 months no matter the mileage as I only get about 2500 miles on it in 6 months. Manual calls for 7500 miles or 6 months.

And being I can't work on it myself anymore I have been using Ford's "The Works" service package every 6 months. This includes the oil/filter change, rotating the tires, and a bunch of other visual checks including a battery load test. This makes me feel more comfortable as I can't even get underneath my truck anymore. The cost is only a couple bucks more than just an oil/filter change and well worth it to me.

This thread has been a good one for me. Even though my truck is only 7 years old, like I said I am going to try for this to be my last truck. The little hints posted on what to look for are very helpful.
What you have to realize is that the manufacturers schedule is based on normal usage. If you have either light usage or heavy duty usage, you have to adjust their schedule accordingly. Also, many of their schedules are based on both time or mileage, so if the time is exceeded before the mileage, then you adjust accordingly. I change oil in my vehicles every spring and fall as my mileage rarely exceeds 5,000 miles per year. In the case of your transmission, I probably would change it much earlier than the 150,000 mileage you mentioned as I would consider time being more important than mileage. The hardest thing on a vehicle is the start and stop routine. Once they are running and warmed up, the wear and tear is much less. If your 5,000 miles per years consist of mostly of a 1 mile trip to the store, that is severe service. On the other hand, if that 5,000 miles per year is all in one trip of normal driving, that is light service. Remember, just because the manufacturer specifies a certain service interval does not mean that you must wait that long. You can always adjust to shorter service intervals.

Dave
 

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That is something to be proud of.
I am very proud of both my truck and how long I've kept her going. I consider it to be one of my greatest achievements to date and I don't know how or if I will ever surpass it. She is slow and ugly... But damn if she isn't also the toughest truck I've ever owned. I wouldn't hesitate for a moment to hook up my gooseneck, load up the John Deere, and drive anywhere in North America right now... As long as I can leave after dinner (french toast with bacon :bigthumb:) and I am home in time for work tomorrow morning! :lol:

The key to longevity in anything mechanical has three parts: 1) You have to start with a quality product in the first place that you trust and are comfortable with. 2) You have to take good care of it and treat it with respect. 3) A little luck doesn't hurt either. Even given the choice between two otherwise identical trucks, one might simply be better put together than the other.
 
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