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It still amazes me the power that diesel engine makes. With the last sample blast of early winter this week I got the 1023E out for some exercise in the driveway. With drifts hard packed and over 3 feet high, it handled it no problem. I had changed the snowblower speed, exchanging the 40 tooth sprocket for a 36 tooth and shortened the chain. It definitely made chain removal & lubrication easier by adding a master link. That sprocket change speed up the blower by 10%. It don't sound like much but it did throw that heavy hard pack and ice farther into the yard. Diesel power was undaunted at all speeds with the change. Tractor's diesel power and torque more than handled the 10% speed up. I can only see lesser dense and more normal fluffier snow being thrown even farther. The hard pack heavy snow was a good test for the sprocket change.
 

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Yes diesel power can be awesome. A couple years back, while my 1 series was at the dealer, we had a heavy 12" snow fall. I asked a friend up the road if he could plow my driveway when he had time. He tossed me the keys to his cabbed Kubota L something. It's in the ballpark of 60hp with at least a 72" front mounted blade. It had no trouble with 12" of heavy snow at idle. 1500rpm! Diesel power
 

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Just got a little over 2.5 feet of Lake effect with some drifts reaching 5 feet. I completely agree, these little things pack a punch. All I have for snow removal is my bucket and I tell ya what it was just fine. May buy a blower but using the bucket is way more fun!
 

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Just got a little over 2.5 feet of Lake effect with some drifts reaching 5 feet. I completely agree, these little things pack a punch. All I have for snow removal is my bucket and I tell ya what it was just fine. May buy a blower but using the bucket is way more fun!
Went from blower to bucket when I upgraded in 2013. What took me 40 minutes with the old NH with a blower took me almost 2 with bucket. Yeah I know, more seat time. Not w/o a cab and the wind I had that fist storm..... blower was on order within the hour. Want a hard side too someday.

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Where did you find the 36 tooth sprocket? I love my blower, but my old Wheel Horse 520H with a single stage blower would throw snow farther. I would love to get more distance out of what I have now. The sprocket sounds like a cheap mod.
 

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Glad to hear you're enjoying your tractor and blower. Wondering same thing as others where did you find the 36 tooth gear ?


SIL has owned a front blade for 8 years or more, would always use the fel , OH it is so much quicker..

Last winter they had 30-36" snowstorm, After doing maybe 50-75' in close to 45 mins. Changed to front blade cleared his .3-.5 of a mile driveway in about 2-3 hrs. He is looking for a front snowblower and maybe a larger tractor ,he has a 2305 with hyd fan and 14 acres of woods.
 

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Glad to hear you're enjoying your tractor and blower. Wondering same thing as others where did you find the 36 tooth gear ?


SIL has owned a front blade for 8 years or more, would always use the fel , OH it is so much quicker..

Last winter they had 30-36" snowstorm, After doing maybe 50-75' in close to 45 mins. Changed to front blade cleared his .3-.5 of a mile driveway in about 2-3 hrs. He is looking for a front snowblower and maybe a larger tractor ,he has a 2305 with hyd fan and 14 acres of woods.
Ok fellas. Put chain sproket in google. It is a #40 chain. Look for one with for a 1 inch shafts size. There are lots of places on the net. Shy away from chinajunk. Will prolly run you 60 to 70 bucks for a decent one 25 to 40% more for a good one. Buy the midrange priced one. The one on the drive shafts side is junk anyway. By the way, they do not know how to make a welding jig where the welded sprokets is off center. Some worse than others. So good luck setting the chain tension. Rotate the drive while doing this. Split the difference.
When I do my rightbuild, I am buying all SKF concentric locking bearings, Browning chain and gears and a new shaft as what is there cannot be reused. I also have already the original metal impeller to swap out the plastic junk impeller. That modification alone will throw the snow much farther. By the way, I will be switching to a #50 chain, like the older units were made. I am considering the appropriate sized Timing Belt set up. That would require fabrication of an enclosure to keep out ice snow or rocks out, but that would be a much better solution for driveline longevity. And before anyone says a belt won't take the torque/hp, i run that type set up on a homemade gen set. So very feasible. Just throwing the ideas out there. Might cost 400 to do it right, but what the hell. Already have 30k+ into tractor and equipment. What is $4 or 5 hundred more.

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My 54" blower seems to throw the snow plenty far with the stock sprockets... :dunno:

I did fix the chain tension when I got it, whatever part-time lackey set it up had the chain as tight as a gondola cable.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Where did you find the 36 tooth sprocket? I love my blower, but my old Wheel Horse 520H with a single stage blower would throw snow farther. I would love to get more distance out of what I have now. The sprocket sounds like a cheap mod.
I got my sprocket and a 10 foot length of #40 chain with two master links from Red Boar Chain & Fastener Call 208-597-3500 <[email protected]>

Sprockets and Hubs | Red Boar Chain & Fastener Call 208-597-3500

It cost me 1x #40 ROLLER CHAIN 10FT ROLL W/FREE CONNECTOR LINK - Price per one roll. for
$18.10 each
1x Sprocket 40B36H Heat treated Type B for #40 Roller Chain 36 Tooth - 1" Bore
for $26.90 each. Sprocket is all one piece not welded.

And got free shipping

The 1" sprocket bore with keyway and two taped (5/16) holes as original. But it has a nice snug fit on the shaft, no wobble. The chain slack/tension is uniform as rotated. The original 19 tooth driver on mine was good and runs true. I used a length of chain 24" long counting the master link. Original I think was 26". Can't be positive on those lengths so measure yourself, it's been awhile.

I definitely disagree the stock ratio can be improved on for a diesel. Perhaps a smaller yet sprocket (34/35 tooth) will be even better. Keep in mind this blower was provided for both gas as well as diesel tractors. When the diesel is loaded up it does not drop off as a gas engine does.

I just checked by book with notes for the John Deere and the chain lengths are correct.
 

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My 54" blower seems to throw the snow plenty far with the stock sprockets... :dunno:

I did fix the chain tension when I got it, whatever part-time lackey set it up had the chain as tight as a gondola cable.
I think that some of the techs think the chain is supposed to be tightened like a guitar string so they can make a "tune" by strumming it. Excessive tightness is a great way to get to repair and replace the chain and components more often..........:good2:Of course, excess slack isn't good either.

I had my replacement chain made with a master link and the spare I keep in the parts box that also has a master link. Sure makes replacing them easier.
 

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My 54" blower seems to throw the snow plenty far with the stock sprockets... :dunno:

I did fix the chain tension when I got it, whatever part-time lackey set it up had the chain as tight as a gondola cable.
Compared to my old blower on my sold New Holland, this thing does not throw well. Will do the upgrade next year when my work slows down a bit ( I hope)

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Yes diesel power can be awesome. A couple years back, while my 1 series was at the dealer, we had a heavy 12" snow fall. I asked a friend up the road if he could plow my driveway when he had time. He tossed me the keys to his cabbed Kubota L something. It's in the ballpark of 60hp with at least a 72" front mounted blade. It had no trouble with 12" of heavy snow at idle. 1500rpm! Diesel power
I have to politely disagree with the impression people are giving that diesel horse power and torque is "Different" than gasoline horse power and torque. I've spent thousands of hours on gasoline tractors and diesel tractors. Both have limits, but they are determined in some similar ways and other times in different ways. Cubic inches of displacement is a good measure of potential torque, lower high speed engine rpm is another. I've pushed two feet of snow with my #1 snow mover, 80 inch wide blade at 1200 rpm 30+ HP gasoline engine. The engine is rated at 1650 rpm, but maximum torque is at 750-800 rpm. It's called torque rise, as the engine rpm slows down due to increasing load it pulls harder to lug it's way though the tough spot. A diesel engine can do that too, but so can many gasoline engines.

I've seen intercooled turbo diesels that would pull the load fine at 2100 rpm, but to start the load on the run you have to have the engine spinning 1500 rpm and increasing at a brisk pace or the engine would stall. Poor torque rise!

Horse power is a function of rpm and torque. It all depends on where the engineer wanted the torque peaks and HP peaks to be.
 

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I have to politely disagree with the impression people are giving that diesel horse power and torque is "Different" than gasoline horse power and torque. I've spent thousands of hours on gasoline tractors and diesel tractors. Both have limits, but they are determined in some similar ways and other times in different ways. Cubic inches of displacement is a good measure of potential torque, lower high speed engine rpm is another. I've pushed two feet of snow with my #1 snow mover, 80 inch wide blade at 1200 rpm 30+ HP gasoline engine. The engine is rated at 1650 rpm, but maximum torque is at 750-800 rpm. It's called torque rise, as the engine rpm slows down due to increasing load it pulls harder to lug it's way though the tough spot. A diesel engine can do that too, but so can many gasoline engines.

I've seen intercooled turbo diesels that would pull the load fine at 2100 rpm, but to start the load on the run you have to have the engine spinning 1500 rpm and increasing at a brisk pace or the engine would stall. Poor torque rise!

Horse power is a function of rpm and torque. It all depends on where the engineer wanted the torque peaks and HP peaks to be.
Typically a diesel of the same Hp as a gasser in small naturally aspirated engines and not specifically designed in a certain way, the diesel will almost always produce more torque. One thing I am sure you will not dispute is an unincumber diesel will always get better fuel economy. Especially now our gov't keeps mixing that crap ethanol with gas. Now if you factor in the other gov't FUBAR stuff they have pushed on diesel owners for no good reason, well diesel still wins, but by not as much. Gas motors are typically designed for speed not pulling power. Unless you happen to have a unique application like you list.

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Discussion Starter #16
IMHO the advertised horsepower and torque specified are not accurate. Either the diesels are advertised to be to low, and/or the gas models are over rated. Especially the torque ratings. Common sense says a 3 cylinder diesel has more power pulses on the crank over a 2 cylinder gas. Given that a 24 HP gas engine vs a 24 HP diesel both at 3000 RPM should be about equal according to advertised published spec. But in actual use the diesel feels far more powerful. With say the snowblower loaded up in each the diesel holds it's RPM and doesn't load down and loose RPM's the way the gas model does. If the engines were rated true the sales on the gas would drop off in favor of other brands. Again IMHO it's just a sales game making the gas power numbers artificially high.

Even in pick up trucks the diesel pulls/tows far better than an equal size gas engine hands down. The diesel tractors follow suit.
 

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From my experience with tractors, torque rules, and a diesel will always out-pull a gas engine rated at the same hp.

Case in point... in 1989 the 5.9 Liter Dodge Cummins diesel was rated at 160hp, at 2500 rpms..but had 400 lb-ft of torque. The 2.4 liter engine in my Camry is rated at 170 hp. Hook each of them to a 5th wheel trailer and see what happens...
 

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From my experience with tractors, torque rules, and a diesel will always out-pull a gas engine rated at the same hp.

Case in point... in 1989 the 5.9 Liter Dodge Cummins diesel was rated at 160hp, at 2500 rpms..but had 400 lb-ft of torque. The 2.4 liter engine in my Camry is rated at 170 hp. Hook each of them to a 5th wheel trailer and see what happens...
You start out talking about tractors, then your example is comparing a passenger car to a heavy-duty pickup truck?!?!?

Well, if the Toyota had 12-15 speeds forward properly spaced the Toyota would win easily. If the Toyota only had three speeds the truck would win. The other thing you have to keep in mind, a diesel engine will almost always be larger displacement and much heavier than a gasoline engine of same HP. And as long as you keep them in their operating range of RPM they will perform similarly. The dyno's they test tractors on at the Nebraska test labs are the exact same regardless of what fuel the engine burns. The rules for testing HP are all cast in stone by the SAE and ASAE. There's only one set of rules.

I've run 200-225 HP trucks over hundreds of thousands of miles hauling freight. Some gas powered, some diesel. There really isn't that much difference in how they perform. Number of transmission speeds, the RPM drop when shifting up makes much more difference than what fuel the engine burns. Yes, the gas engine will burn more fuel, sometimes a LOT more fuel, but the bottom line is cost per mile. And more companies are switching back to gasoline fueled trucks for their light and medium duty needs. Second year I hauled ready-mix cement between my Soph & Jr year in college my 1966 White had a 165 HP Cummins, and TWENTY forward gears and four reverses in a 52,000# truck. Some hills I could not downshift fast enough, I had to slow to a speed the truck could crawl up the hill and let the cars pile up behind me!

I'm keeping my 20 year old diesel pickup with 301,000 miles, it runs good, paid for, but twenty years of use has caused issues, rusted power steering, fuel, and brake lines, I've spent $2000+ on those the last 3-4 years! If I bought a new truck today it would most certainly be gasoline powered. They're cheaper to begin with, fuel & maintenance is cheaper, probably have to be a RAM, they're the only company that still puts a manual trans in them.
 

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I bet this topic comes up all the time here, and I bet the moderators grind their teeth every time... :laugh:

Torque is a measure of rotational force (at the end of a 1 foot long lever arm).

Horsepower is a measure of work over time, relying on both Torque and Revolutionary Speed (RPM).

A quick google search will provide a formula. Horsepower = (Torque in Foot Pounds) x (Revolutionary Speed in RPM) / 5,252

So, in short, if an engine is making 1 ft.lb. of torque at 5,252 RPM, it is producing 1 horsepower.

Because Diesels tend to never reach 5,252 RPM, they must make a lot of torque to create equal horsepower to a higher revving gasoline engine. This is very true in the Automotive arena. Not as true in our tractor arena where our Yanmar Diesels rev to 3,300 RPM and a Kohler V-Twin revs to 3,750. That means the Yanmar and the Kohler are making very similar torque, at rated engine speed.

Where the difference really lies in in the Torque Curve. The diesels will make close to maximum torque way down low, usually just a little above idle. Then torque will roll off gently as RPM increases. Gasoline engines produce torque very differently, usually producing their lowest torque at idle with a steady increase as RPM increases, usually peaking a little short of their rated engine speed. This makes the diesels typically better at maintaining torque under load.

There are other major considerations too that make the diesels better choices for tractors. Efficiency and longevity. A diesel engine will almost always use significantly less fuel, and will typically last far longer (hours/miles).
 
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