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Hello all! In my latest entry, filed under "stupid things" I bought 5 gallons of kerosene instead of diesel.

That being said, the kerosene (and a bale of hay) DID get my brush pile gone. I wanted to split the 5 gallons between the hay bale and the tractor- top off the tank to ensure I had enough to tend the fire and whatnot.

Anyway, I didn't put the kero in the tractor tank- at the time, the tank was a bit above half full, and now it's just above 1/4 tank. After doing some reading I think it would be ok to add a little bit at a time (5:1 maybe?) and double up on the Howe's additive to put back the lubricity into the fuel the kerosene doesn't have.

I really don't have any other use for kerosene- I use propane for my garage heat. Will it clean chainsaw chains? Paintbrushes?

Anybody with experience feel free to chime in. I don't want to keep it around, but I don't want to waste it either.
 

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I really don't have any other use for kerosene- I use propane for my garage heat. Will it clean chainsaw chains? Paintbrushes?

Anybody with experience feel free to chime in. I don't want to keep it around, but I don't want to waste it either.
Do a few Google searches. Kerosene is an excellent cleaner, especially on chains.
 

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I'm not suggesting you do or don't do anything but I did have a Kubota that got its tank filled with kerosene by an employee on accident. Other than the exhaust smelling like kerosene the tractor burned it without any noticeable difference. Although I would have preferred he hadn't of done it, he learned a lesson about fuel and all was fine.
 

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Years ago when I was running a fleet of trucks we used 50/50 kerosene - diesel blended fuel in the Winter. The trucks cold-started fine and ran with a bit more power and less smoke. That was then and some things have changed. I wouldn't hesitate to blend your remaining kerosene with diesel fuel to use it up.
 

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Not sure what tractor you have, but a diesel engine should burn kerosene just fine. I heard about a guy with a diesel truck that ran out of fuel- he filled up with kerosene and went on his way. Another guy I heard about ran out of diesel out in the middle of nowhere, and the station wouldn't sell him kerosene for his truck, so he bought a couple gallons of corn oil at the convenience store and used that until he could get diesel.
 

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...bought a couple gallons of corn oil at the convenience store and used that until he could get diesel.
I'm not doubting you, but will this really work?
 

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You can use it in the winter time if you mix it diesel 60/40 kerosene. I do. Make sure to add some diesel fuel lubricant. I run kerosene mix in the winter. Try to run it out before the weather turns hot.
 

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If you heat with fuel oil you can put the 5 gal of kero in the fuel oil tank.
Maybe 9MMMAC could find someone local that uses those free standing kerosene room heaters and sell the stuff.
 

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Not sure what tractor you have, but a diesel engine should burn kerosene just fine. I heard about a guy with a diesel truck that ran out of fuel- he filled up with kerosene and went on his way. Another guy I heard about ran out of diesel out in the middle of nowhere, and the station wouldn't sell him kerosene for his truck, so he bought a couple gallons of corn oil at the convenience store and used that until he could get diesel.
Plus if you don't use all the corn oil, you can use it for evacuation of the bowels.:laugh:
 

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Given the cost of John Deere tractors, I wouldn't mess around guessing what the kerosene may or may not do. Just use it to clean parts and fill the tractor with fresh diesel.
 

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A diesel engine can run on it just fine and up north we get blends with it all the time. The concern I would have isn't the engine but that it may be hard on the emissions if your tractor is newer and has a DPF. Many of these emissions systems are much more fussy about the fuel being used with them. An older machine wouldn't bat an eye. I guess they call this progress.... :dunno:
 

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A diesel engine can run on it just fine and up north we get blends with it all the time. The concern I would have isn't the engine but that it may be hard on the emissions if your tractor is newer and has a DPF. Many of these emissions systems are much more fussy about the fuel being used with them. An older machine wouldn't bat an eye. I guess they call this progress.... :dunno:
Which Sub Compact Tractor has a DPF? I thought the whole idea of going from 26hp to 25 hp was to skirt those fussy emissions systems?

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I'm not doubting you, but will this really work?
It would, a few guys run their VW’s on used vegetable oil. It will run on it but probably would not start. They start on diesel, switch to oil and then switch back to diesel before shutting it down so it will start next time.
 

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1025R has one as far as I know. I just looked at the manual and it talks about an exhaust filter and how it can run hotter and at higher RPM when the exhaust filter is being cleaned. That sounds like a DPF Regen cycle to me. Not sure on the 1023E but it is the same manual for both.

From the operator manual:

During exhaust filter cleaning operations, the engine may run at elevated idle and hot temperatures for an extended period of time. Exhaust gases and exhaust filter components reach temperatures hot enough to burn people, or ignite or melt common materials.
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It would, a few guys run their VW’s on used vegetable oil. It will run on it but probably would not start. They start on diesel, switch to oil and then switch back to diesel before shutting it down so it will start next time.
As a former Jetta TDI owner you have to be careful with this. I don't recall anyone doing this with a 2009+ VW TDI engine. Those are the ones that had to have all the emissions changes which got VW in trouble and they had to buy back the cars like they did with my 09. Now, I will agree that it is done in the 2006 and older ones but they didn't have all the emissions stuff. Even so it did require some extensive modifications to the engine to run straight veggy oil. I don't think there was much to the engine itself more to the fuel delivery. The engine will run on it but as you mentioned you needed two tanks and had to run on diesel not only to start but until the engine is up to operating temp. As you probably know, a diesel engine doesn't have spark plugs. It just squeezes the fuel/air mix until the heat from compression causes it to ignite. Glow plugs are there to help warm things while the engine is cold or it might not be able to get to the flash point with compression alone.

If there are any 09+ cars running straight veggy oil they might have done an engine swap with the old 1.9TDI engine. That would probably be easier than trying to get by all the emissions crap in the 2.0 TDI. Heck I couldn't even run bio-diesel in mix rates higher than B10. This was because during DPF regen it injects fuel into the cylinder on the exhaust stroke to work its way down to the DPF. The problem isn't that the bio-diesel will cause a problem so much with the DPF but rather that it gets past the piston rings and will dilute the engine oil. If dinosaur based diesel gets past the rings it will evaporate out when the engine oil reaches operating temp. Bio based diesel won't evaporate and will mess up the engine oil. When states started mandating B20 (80% Diesel/20% Bio-diesel) VW sent out a modification for our owners manual which stated that if we lived in a state where B20 was required by law, that we won't void our warranty by running it. However we had to keep an eye on our engine oil level. If we saw the engine oil too high, we had to perform an oil change even if we were not at the 10K mile interval. It went on to mention that it may be necessary to go down to 5K mile oil change intervals.
 

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Which Sub Compact Tractor has a DPF? I thought the whole idea of going from 26hp to 25 hp was to skirt those fussy emissions systems?

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There still additional emissions requirements with Tier 4 compliance. You are right that part of the reason they went from 1026 to the 1025 and stay under that 25HP limit. I think the 1026 was rated at something like 25.2hp. Not a full 26. This wasn't to necessarily avoid a DPF so much as it probably avoids even more requirements. Possibly urea injection, EGR and other more complex and expensive emissions components. I want to say I saw somewhere that the 0.2hp of the 1026 would have required a further 17% reduction in emissions than what is required for a sub 25hp engine. They were so close to the cutoff and no one would notice a reduction in a fraction of a HP so it made sense.
 

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1025R has one as far as I know. I just looked at the manual and it talks about an exhaust filter and how it can run hotter and at higher RPM when the exhaust filter is being cleaned. That sounds like a DPF Regen cycle to me. Not sure on the 1023E but it is the same manual for both.
I'm pretty sure the 1-series does not have a DPF. My guess is the safety section in the operator's manual is simply copied from other manuals.

Ironically, I was going to check the parts listing for the 1-series to see if the exhaust was any different by there is currently an error on the website. If you try to view the exhaust manifold you get a GIF error. Oddly, all other sections work fine.

[edit] I was able to view the muffler in the new parts catalog. No DPF.

1_muffler.jpg
 
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