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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Jgayman mentioned wishing he knew the lift capacity using his forks on his tractor. This is a difficult question to answer in one sentence, but I can at least try to offer the variables that affect it. Here are some that come to mind, but there may be more.

**This assumes having adequate rear counterbalance, or ballast.**

Attachment weight - Obviously, the heavier the attachment the less potential it will have to lift other things. If you don't need the backrest (aka headache rack, brush guard, etc), take it off and you gain lift capacity.

Distance of the load center of gravity (CG) away from the loader - Obviously, the farther out, the less you will be able to lift. There is a graph here for a point of reference. Always plan your load placement to keep as much weight in close to the loader as safely possible.

Elevation of the load - If you are starting from the back of a pickup truck, your lift capacity will be less than starting from the ground because loaders lose potential as they go higher up.

Curl Angle - If you can curl your load up (and back) it moves the CG closer to the loader, which increases lift capacity.

Pitch angle - If your tractor is sloping uphill, you will be able to lift more than if you are sloping downhill. This is because the CG of a given load will naturally be closer to the loader on an uphill.

Fork tine length - Longer fork tines have higher weight and a CG farther away from the loader. Take two forks, one 48" long and one 24" long. That extra two feet compounds the loss in lift capacity because the weight of that extra length is multiplied by its distance away so a 48" fork that weighs 40 Lbs more than the 24" one might have a 50 or 60 Lb effect on the lift capacity of the whole system.

Fork tine taper - Full taper fork tines have a CG that is closer to the loader than a Standard taper fork tine. See here for an illustration of the difference.

I hope this helps. If more come to mind, I'll add them. Unless you think of them first....
 

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Good info. Thank you!
 

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Would it be reasonable to add a comment about engine speed and PTO potential?

Specifically, what I'm thinking is this:

If you run the engine outside of the rated speed, you lose potential for lift (especially if you're running slower). And, to that end, I try to always run mine at the very bottom of the recommended PTO range so that I can get just a very little bit of extra "oomph" if I need it.

Also - on some machines, the hydraulic pump that raises the loader is the same one to provide fluid pressure to the HST. So, if you're moving at all, you lose lift potential.
 

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Those are all very good basic forklift principles. I've said it before that I wish I would have purchased Artillian forks vs the Frontier that I did buy. The extra weight on the Frontier 48" is probably all I would need to lift those extra 10 pieces of firewood. At least I should have selected 42" forks rather than the 48". Don't get me wrong, the Frontier is a well built piece of equipment but I learned that the extra weight is robbing from the low lift capacity of the 1026R. I do work with it regardless and use some of the suggestions Artillian posted which helps. Anyway, a good topic. :drinks:
 

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Those are all very good basic forklift principles. I've said it before that I wish I would have purchased Artillian forks vs the Frontier that I did buy. The extra weight on the Frontier 48" is probably all I would need to lift those extra 10 pieces of firewood. At least I should have selected 42" forks rather than the 48". Don't get me wrong, the Frontier is a well built piece of equipment but I learned that the extra weight is robbing from the low lift capacity of the 1026R. I do work with it regardless and use some of the suggestions Artillian posted which helps. Anyway, a good topic. :drinks:
Here as well. In my defense, when I bought our Frontier forks Artillian was just a slacker and had not designed his yet, I saw no other choice.
 

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GTT Vendor
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Discussion Starter #6
Would it be reasonable to add a comment about engine speed and PTO potential?

Specifically, what I'm thinking is this:

If you run the engine outside of the rated speed, you lose potential for lift (especially if you're running slower). And, to that end, I try to always run mine at the very bottom of the recommended PTO range so that I can get just a very little bit of extra "oomph" if I need it.

Also - on some machines, the hydraulic pump that raises the loader is the same one to provide fluid pressure to the HST. So, if you're moving at all, you lose lift potential.
It is my understanding that engine speed has no effect on pump pressure, ie lift capacity. It only affects the speed. If that is accurate, then it's certainly possible that the extra speed could give extra momentum, which might seem like extra lift capacity, and actually become extra lift capacity in the algorithm of reality (aka the 'real world').
 

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Another very important thing to remember is that with forks on a FEL you still do not have a forklift, it is a FEL with forks. When you curl up or down you have to be extra careful because it curls so far back or tips right over compared to a real fork truck that simply tilts the load to shift the COG. Once you master this unique difference though it offers another useful function to carry brush etc. and tipping the load off too.
 

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You also need to consider that it isn't always possible to have the COG evenly between the forks. Having more weight on one fork than the other will make a big difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Here as well. In my defense, when I bought our Frontier forks Artillian was just a slacker and had not designed his yet, I saw no other choice.
The Frontier forks are great, of course, and what I still recommend to folks with larger machines when asked about a larger capacity frame. They were also basically the genesis of Artillian. Having a machine at the time that could lift around 700-800 lbs, there just wasn't much point to me in using 400 of them on the attachment. Sort of left me scratching my head and, long story short, here we are. Still a slacker though, ha ha. Just one who works a LOT more hours. Who let this guy in here anyway?
 
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