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I'll be playing with my new 1023e come sometime next week. I talked to the dealer today about installing a block heater, he said it really wasn't necessary. I'm a little unsure, but I trust the man, he's seems like a good guy. However, I thought I'd ask here, likely some of you live in a part of the country where winter is cold. Here in Maine we have some cold snaps when the temps don't rise all that high.

Do any of you have trouble starting your tractors when it's cold? Mine will be stored undercover in a non heated barn.
 

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block header

I'll be playing with my new 1023e come sometime next week. I talked to the dealer today about installing a block heater, he said it really wasn't necessary. I'm a little unsure, but I trust the man, he's seems like a good guy. However, I thought I'd ask here, likely some of you live in a part of the country where winter is cold. Here in Maine we have some cold snaps when the temps don't rise all that high.

Do any of you have trouble starting your tractors when it's cold? Mine will be stored undercover in a non heated barn.
i also have 1023 e i store mine in a non-headed garage,i had no problem's starting when temps were below zero outside.
 

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I got one with my used 2004 790, I haven't installed it. After 4 north MO winters, I've never needed it, just use the glow plugs as directed & it starts right up! ~~ Lowell
 

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You shouldn't have a problem getting it started in the Winter. The glow plugs will take care of business. That being said a block heater will take the chill out of the engine, assist with quicker warm-up and allow the oil to circulate a bit more quickly than if starting it at ambient temperature. I have block heaters on my diesels and generally plug them in an hour or so before using the machines. They start quickly, no excessive smoke and no knocking noises which is common with diesels when started cold.
 

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I agree with SuperGlideSport. My original dealer talked me out of it, I later had a different dealer add it. It started when cold, but now with the heater I get very little smoke and much faster warm up. I feel much better knowing that the oil is warm enough to circulate right away. I would also recommend the 180 degree thermostat to replace the 160 that is standard. Engine runs smoother for us northeners.

Rich Baxter
 

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Another vote for the heater. It's better to have and not need, than need and not have it. Cold weather can be very hard on diesels.
 

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My dealer actually talked me into getting the block heater. I hadn't thought about it but he recommends the block heater for faster starts and warm ups during the cold Wisconsin winters. Easier on the engine for longevity.
 

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Absolutely take the option.

Easy starts in the cold is just a small advantage.
The real payoff is in the oil actually flowing when it's -15F, fewer problems with fuel gelling and seperating, quicker warm up of the hydro with less cavitation, less chance of moisture in the hydro freezing and creating a mess, longer engine life, and less battery and starter wear.

A warm block, means everything bolted to it is warmed as well. Under a tarp means the thing will be good and toasty, with short warm up times when you need to push snow.;)

It's a hard to beat price when it's a dealer option, and will always be there if you need it.

Maine?
LOL!!!
Yeah, you'll like it.

Good luck and congrats on the new tractor!!
 

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I am a firm believer of a block heater on Diesels even living in North Texas we get our cold snaps. I run a thermostat the same type used for de-icing mats made by EZ heat. Keeps from burning electrons when temps are warm enough.

My tractor did not come with one but I will be adding it.
 

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I'll be playing with my new 1023e come sometime next week. I talked to the dealer today about installing a block heater, he said it really wasn't necessary. I'm a little unsure, but I trust the man, he's seems like a good guy. However, I thought I'd ask here, likely some of you live in a part of the country where winter is cold. Here in Maine we have some cold snaps when the temps don't rise all that high.

Do any of you have trouble starting your tractors when it's cold? Mine will be stored undercover in a non heated barn.
I just bought a new 1025R and I was wondering the same thing. I live in upstate NY. My will be living in a heated garage right next to my snowmobiles and if it doesn't start I'm gonna say the heck with it and go ride the sleds.:laugh:
 

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I just bought a new 1025R and I was wondering the same thing. I live in upstate NY. My will be living in a heated garage right next to my snowmobiles and if it doesn't start I'm gonna say the heck with it and go ride the sleds.:laugh:
My two cents, the machine should have been sold with it installed. It is a no brainer. If you have it and don't need it good, if you don't well you are SOL. In a heated garage you are ok, but what happens if it is outside for some reason and it is 30 below? Cheap insurance.:greentractorride:
 

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I had one installed on mine and I live in NC. Dealer looked at me kinda funny when I said I wanted one. You never know, I might get a wild hair to move back home to Minnesota! :lol:

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk
 
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