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Discussion Starter #1
After purchasing my 2012 Express Van with the Duramax, I did much research online. I had a P2BAD code popped up. It was a Nox Sensor. My van was out just out of the five year warranty so the dealer lightened me of $750.00.

So, I joined a couple of forums that related to the van and the Duramax. I am concerned with ULSD Fuel. While it's less than 5% of all the Duramax's out there, if the CP4 pump decides to 'explode' get ready to write a $10,000.00 check.

So what to do? Convert to back to a CP3 Pump? $1,800.00. Nah. Lube! While it appears that soybean bio fuel is the best, Opti Lube XLP is the next best thing. I can't find any bio diesel near me, I ordered some XLP. I ordered an Opti Box with the 8 oz bottles and a gallon refill with pump.

I tried some in my work van which is a 2007 Duramax van chassis (without DEF of course). I plan to start using it regularly in my Duramax Yoder Toter. I hope I stay out of the Duramax rebuild business.

Isaac
 

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I use the Opti Lube XPD in my 1025r. Good stuff.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Never did like OptiLube but love Stanadyne Lubricity.

Bought a gallon of the OL XLP after running Stanadyne for 20k miles and could hear a difference and lost fuel mileage. Went quickly back to Standayne.

Do yourself a favor, spend the $1800 for a CP3 and never look back. CP4s are crap and have exploded with and without lubricity.
 

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I've had a TDI for a few years and used a couple different additives for increased lubricity since I owned it, Power Service, OptiLube, Stanadyne whatever was on the shelf when i was buying. On the TDI forum I see other TDI owners that used the additives still suffering the HPFP failures costing big $$. Some have added an after market 2 micron filter that limits the damage so a complete replacement of the entire system isn't necessary. Is this an option for your Duramax?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm not really interested in gaining millage. Would not be mad if it happened. My main concern is lubrication.

I found this, you may have already seen it:

The following are the preliminary results of a research study on diesel fuel Lubricity Additives. There is likely to be further commentary and explanation added at a future time.

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this research was to determine the ability of multiple diesel fuel additives to replace the vital lubricity component in ULSD (Ultra Low Sulfer Diesel) fuel.

HISTORY:

ULSD fuel is the fuel currently mandated for use in all on road diesel engines. This fuel burns cleaner and is less polluting than it’s predecessor, called Low Sulfer Diesel Fuel. Low sulfer fuel contained less than 500 ppm of sulfer. ULSD contains 15 ppm or less.
As diesel fuel is further refined to remove the polluting sulfer, it is inadvertently stripped of its lubricating properties. This vital lubrication is a necessary component of the diesel fuel as it prevents wear in the fuel delivery system. Specifically, it lubricates pumps, high pressure pumps and injectors. Traditional Low sulfer diesel fueltypically contained enough lubricating ability to suffice the needs of these vital components. ULSD fuel, on the other hand, is considered to be very “dry” and incapable of lubricating vital fuel delivery components. As a result, these components are at risk of premature and even catastrophic failure when ULSD fuel is introduced to the system. As a result, all oil companies producing ULSD fuel must replace the lost lubricity with additives. All ULSD fuel purchased at retail fuel stations SHOULD be adequately treated with additives to replace this lost lubricity. The potential result of using inadequately treated fuel, as indicated above, can be catastrophic. There have been many documented cases of randomly tested samples of diesel fuel. These tests prove that often times the fuel we purchase is not adequately treated and may therefore contribute to accelerated wear of our fuel delivery systems. For this reason it may be prudent to use an after market diesel fuel additive to ENSURE adequate lubrication of the fuel delivery system. Additionally, many additives can offer added benefits such as cetane improver, and water separators or emulsifiers.

CONTENT:

In this study we will test multiple diesel fuel additives designed to replace lost lubricity. The primary component of this study is a side-by-side laboratory analysis of each additive’s ability to replace this vital lubricity. Additionally, claims of improving cetane, water separation or emulsification, bio-diesel compatibility and alcohol content will be noted. These notes were derived from information that was readily available to consumers (via the label and internet information) and none of this information has been evaluated for validity and/or performance. Cetane information has only been noted if the word “cetane” was used in the advertising information. The words “improves power” has not been translated to mean “improves cetane” in this evaluation. Information on alcohol content is provided by indicating “contains no alcohol”. Omission of the words “contains no alcohol” does not imply that it does contain alcohol. This information was simply missing in the information available to a consumer. However, the possibility of a form of alcohol in these products is possible. Additionally, information on dosages and cost per tankful are included for comparison purposes.

How Diesel Fuel Is Evaluated For Lubricating Ability:

Diesel fuel and other fluids are tested for lubricating ability using a device called a “High Frequency Reciprocating Rig” or HFRR. The HFRR is currently the Internationally accepted, standardized method to evaluate fluids for lubricating ability. It uses a ball bearing that reciprocates or moves back and forth on a metal surface at a very high frequency for a duration of 90 minutes. The machine does this while the ball bearing and metal surface are immersed in the test fluid (in this case, treated diesel fuel). At the end of the test the ball bearing is examined under a microscope and the “wear scar” on the ball bearing is measured in microns. The larger the wear scar, the poorer the lubricating ability of the fluid. Southwest Research runs every sample twice and averages the size of the wear scar.
The U.S. standard for diesel fuel says a commercially available diesel fuel should produce a wear scar of no greater than 520 microns. The Engine Manufacturers Association had requested a standard of a wear scar no greater than 460 microns, typical of the pre-ULSD fuels. Most experts agree that a 520 micron standard is adequate, but also that the lower the wear scar the better.

METHOD:

An independent research firm in Texas was hired to do the laboratory work. The cost of the research was paid for voluntarily by the participating additive manufacturers. Declining to participate and pay for the research were the following companies: Amsoil and Power Service. Because these are popular products it was determined that they needed to be included in the study. These products were tested using funds collected by diesel enthusiasts at “dieselplace.com”. Additionally, unconventional additives such as 2-cycle oil and used motor oil were tested for their abilities to aid in diesel fuel lubricity. These were also paid for by members of “dieselplace.com”.
The study was conducted in the following manner:
-The Research firm obtained a quantity of “untreated” ULSD fuel from a supplier. This fuel was basic ULSD fuelintended for use in diesel engines. However, this sample was acquired PRIOR to any attempt to additize the fuelfor the purpose of replacing lost lubricity. In other words, it was a “worst case scenario, very dry diesel fuel” that would likely cause damage to any fuel delivery system. This fuel was tested using the HFRR at the Southwest Research Laboratory. This fuel was determined to have a very high HFRR score of 636 microns, typical of an untreated ULSD fuel. It was determined that this batch of fuel would be utilized as the baseline fuel for testing all of the additives. The baseline fuel HFRR score of 636 would be used as the control sample. All additives tested would be evaluated on their ability to replace lost lubricity to the fuel by comparing their scores to the control sample. Any score under 636 shows improvement to the fuels ability to lubricate the fuel delivery system of a diesel engine.

BLIND STUDY:

In order to ensure a completely unbiased approach to the study, the following steps were taken:
Each additive tested was obtained independently via internet or over the counter purchases. The only exceptions were Opti-Lube XPD and the bio-diesel sample. The reason for this is because Opti-Lube XPD additive was considered “experimental” at the time of test enrollment and was not yet on the market. It was sent directly from Opti-Lube company. The bio-diesel sample was sponsored by Renewable Energy Group. One of their suppliers, E.H. Wolf and Sons in Slinger, Wisconsin supplied us with a sample of 100% soybean based bio-diesel. This sample was used to blend with the baseline fuel to create a 2% bio-diesel for testing.
Each additive was bottled separately in identical glass containers. The bottles were labeled only with a number. This number corresponded to the additive contained in the bottle. The order of numbering was done randomly by drawing names out of a hat. Only Spicer Research held the key to the additives in each bottle.
The additive samples were then sent in a box to An independent research firm. The only information given them was the ratio of fuel to be added to each additive sample. For example, bottle “A” needs to be mixed at a ratio of “480-1”. The ratio used for each additive was the “prescribed dosage” found on the bottle label for that product. Used motor oil and 2-cycle oil were tested at a rationally chosen ratio of 200:1.
The Research Laboratory mixed the proper ratio of each “bottled fluid” into a separate container containing the baseline fuel. The data, therefore, is meaningful because every additive is tested in the same way using the same fuel. A side-by-side comparison of the effectiveness of each additive is now obtainable.

THE RESULTS:

These results are listed in the order of performance in the HFRR test. The baseline fuel used in every test started at an HFRR score of 636. The score shown is the tested HFRR score of the baseline fuel/additive blend.
Also included is the wear scar improvement provided by the additive as well as other claimed benefits of the additive. Each additive is also categorized as a Multi-purpose additive, Multi-purpose + anti-gel, Lubricity only, non-conventional, or as an additive capable of treating both gasoline and diesel fuel.
As a convenience to the reader there is also information on price per treated tank of diesel fuel (using a 26 gallon tank), and dosage per 26 gallon tank provided as “ounces of additive per 26 gallon tank”.

In Order Of Performance:

1) 2% REG SoyPower biodiesel
HFRR 221, 415 micron improvement.
50:1 ratio of baseline fuel to 100% biodiesel
66.56 oz. of 100% biodiesel per 26 gallons of diesel fuel
Price: market value

2)Opti-Lube XPD
Multi-purpose + anti-gel
cetane improver, demulsifier
HFRR 317, 319 micron improvement.
256:1 ratio
13 oz/tank
$4.35/tank

3)FPPF RV, Bus, SUV Diesel/Gas fuel treatment
Gas and Diesel
cetane improver, emulsifier
HFRR 439, 197 micron improvement
640:1 ratio
5.2 oz/tank
$2.60/tank

4)Opti-Lube Summer Blend
Multi-purpose
demulsifier
HFRR 447, 189 micron improvement
3000:1 ratio
1.11 oz/tank
$0.68/tank

5)Opti-Lube Winter Blend
Muti-purpose + anti-gel
cetane improver
HFRR 461, 175 micron improvement
512:1 ratio
6.5 oz/tank
$3.65/tank

6)Schaeffer Diesel Treat 2000
Multi-purpose + anti-gel
cetane improver, emulsifier, bio-diesel compatible
HFRR 470, 166 micron improvement
1000:1 ratio
3.32 oz/tank
$1.87/tank

7)Super Tech Outboard 2-cycle TC-W3 engine oil
Unconventional (Not ULSD compliant, may damage 2007 or newer systems)
HFRR 474, 162 micron improvement
200:1 ratio
16.64 oz/tank
$1.09/tank

8)Stanadyne Lubricity Formula
Lubricity Only
demulsifier, 5% bio-diesel compatible, alcohol free
HFRR 479, 157 micron improvement
1000:1 ratio
3.32 oz/tank
$1.00/tank

9)Amsoil Diesel Concentrate
Multi-purpose
demulsifier, bio-diesel compatible, alcohol free
HFRR 488, 148 micron improvement
640:1 ratio
5.2 oz/tank
$2.16/tank

10)Power Service Diesel Kleen + Cetane Boost
Multi-purpose
Cetane improver, bio-diesel compatible, alcohol free
HFRR 575, 61 micron improvement
400:1 ratio
8.32 oz/tank
$1.58/tank

11)Howe’s Meaner Power Kleaner
Multi-purpose
Alcohol free
HFRR 586, 50 micron improvement
1000:1 ratio
3.32 oz/tank
$1.36/tank

12)Stanadyne Performance Formula
Multi-purpose + anti-gel
cetane improver, demulsifier, 5% bio-diesel compatible, alcohol free
HFRR 603, 33 micron improvement
480:1 ratio
6.9 oz/tank
$4.35/tank

13)Used Motor Oil, Shell Rotella T 15w40, 5,000 miles used.
Unconventional (Not ULSD compliant, may damage systems)
HFRR 634, 2 micron improvement
200:1 ratio
16.64 oz/tank
price: market value

14)Lucas Upper Cylinder Lubricant
Gas or diesel
HFRR 641, 5 microns worse than baseline (statistically insignificant change)
427:1 ratio
7.8 oz/tank
$2.65/tank

15)B1000 Diesel Fuel Conditioner by Milligan Biotech
Multi-purpose, canola oil based additive
HFRR 644, 8 microns worse than baseline (statistically insignificant change)
1000:1 ratio
3.32 oz/tank
$2.67/tank

16)FPPF Lubricity Plus Fuel Power
Multi-purpose + anti-gel
Emulsifier, alcohol free
HFRR 675, 39 microns worse than baseline fuel
1000:1 ratio
3.32 oz/tank
$1.12/tank

17)Marvel Mystery Oil
Gas, oil and Diesel fuel additive (NOT ULSD compliant, may damage 2007 and newer systems)
HFRR 678, 42 microns worse than baseline fuel.
320:1 ratio
10.4 oz/tank
$3.22/tank

18)ValvTect Diesel Guard Heavy Duty/Marine Diesel Fuel Additive
Multi-purpose
Cetane improver, emulsifier, alcohol free
HFRR 696, 60 microns worse than baseline fuel
1000:1 ratio
3.32 oz/tank
$2.38/tank

19)Primrose Power Blend 2003
Multi-purpose
Cetane boost, bio-diesel compatible, emulsifier
HFRR 711, 75 microns worse than baseline
1066:1 ratio
3.12 oz/tank
$1.39/tank

CONCLUSIONS:

Products 1 through 4 were able to improve the unadditized fuel to an HFRR score of 460 or better. This meets the most strict requirements requested by the Engine Manufacturers Association.
Products 1 through 9 were able to improve the unadditized fuel to an HFRR score of 520 or better, meeting the U.S. diesel fuel requirements for maximum wear scar in a commercially available diesel fuel.
Products 16 through 19 were found to cause the fuel/additive blend to perform worse than the baseline fuel. The cause for this is speculative. This is not unprecedented in HFRR testing and can be caused by alcohol or other components in the additives. Further investigation into the possibilities behind these poor results will investigated.
Any additive testing within +/- 20 microns of the baseline fuel could be considered to have no significant change. The repeatability of this test allows for a +/- 20 micron variability to be considered insignificant.

CREDITS:

This study would not have been possible without the participation of all companies involved and dieselplace.com. A special Thank You to all of the dieselplace.com members who generously donated toward this study and waited longer than they should have for the results. You folks are the best. Arlen Spicer, organizer.

Back to me. I have seen some guys install a Caterpillar fuel filter kit. Additional filtration may be a good. My only concern is both the CP3 and CP4 pull fuel. More restriction may cause fuel starvation which is what lubes the pump. It's a double edge sword. Some guys also add a lift pump to push fuel to the CP pump. Flooding the pump has all sorts of guys saying its the way to go and others saying it is a total waste and even some says it causes more harm than good.

I know questioning a guys choice in fuel additive is like questioning their sexuality. I have used Power Service since 2000. First in my 2000 E350 with the 7.3L Diesel. I have continued with my 2007 G3500 6.6L Diesel. I even poured some in my 2012 Express 3500 with the 6.6L Diesel. I'm gonna try Opti-Lube XLP.

isaac



 

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Discussion Starter #7
That is true, Opti-Lube wasn't available in retail yet as mentioned in the study and yes, it was done back in '07 by DieselPlace. I suppose Opti-Lube could have sent a "super hot" sample and then bottle dachshund urine for sale. But somehow I doubt it.

I noticed my beloved Power Service not only did not want to pay for the study. Nor seemed to care. Nor did they score very high. But that is okay with me. I'll still use it. It has served me well since I started using it way back in the early '00's. It is also fairly easy to find and reasonably priced.

I'll run Opti-Lube in my personal van. While mileage increase is an easily measured result, lube enhancement is not so easy to detect. Unless of course the pump decides to self destruct. Again I'm satisfied with the results of personal testimony from people who have logged tons of miles under all sorts of driving conditions. This study just kinda lets me know that PowerService was at least a positive step particularly for pre CP4 pumps. I would rather run soybean biofuel but I can only get it locally in bulk truck deliveries.

I know folks who also swear by Stanadyne. Some of the diesel tuners in the area also require thier clients use it after certain mechanical work is performed. The local hardware even stocks it for a few diesel guys here in town. I think that is great. And if works for you, I cannot tell you how glad I am. This was not an attempt to dismiss Stanadyne or any other product. I wanted investigate and choose what I feel is best for my truck. If nothing else, I hope others can use my findings to help them to make the right choice for themselves.

Isaac
 

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Hiya,

Before they took the sulfur out of fuel I was running Amsoil fuel treatment and cetane boost. Since they went ULSD, I also started adding a pint of Wally World outboard 2 stroke per 20 gallons of fuel. After 25 years, the Bosch VE in my '92 Cummins is running just fine. Granted, this is a "low" pressure type system with a mechanical rotary pump and simple pop-off type injectors compared to 2011 and newer Duramax/Power Strokes with multi-event ECU controlled injectors.

Have you considered adding a primary lift pump to your Duramax? I ask as GM decided not to and one of the conditions that causes wear on a secondary pump is fuel starvation. On trucks that pull heavy loads up long hills or modified engines, it's mandatory to always have positive pressure supplied fuel flow to the supply port on the secondary pump. The reason for this is that, if the secondary pump is allowed to cavitate due to insufficient primary side fuel flow, the high pressure side components will abrade due to direct metal to metal contact. The fuel is required to occupy the space between these moving components, if it's not there, no amount of lubricant in the fuel will prevent damage to the high pressure side of the secondary pump. Once that happens the entire fuel system is compromised and must be disassembled, cleaned and inspected for metallic contamination. Failure to do so will potentially cause the same type of failure soon after.

Another factor that causes secondary pump failures is improper filtration for particle size and flow rate. Too little flow or too big of of a particle rating will cause issues on the secondary pump.

I do have a question, why would you replace a CP4 with another one? The 4 was a cost savings move for GM over the 3. If your rolling along with a large throttle opening to get the truck around, I would almost just bite the bullet and replace the 4 with a 3 and consider it an insurance policy. (I would also sill add a supply side pump, the belt and suspenders mentality there...)
 

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Anyone ever tried Archoil?
 

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At one time I sold a diesel fuel additive. I got to see a bunch of unpublished tests and test results. It becomes very difficult if not impossible to post these results because of all the finger pointing, name calling, and assignment of blame. It gets full on ridiculous on how people can get crazy over their favorite lube, additive, tire, truck brand, gun manufacturer, tractor color, dog food, and even their favorite soda. Most have zero to back up their claims other than they never had a real problem when they used it. How is that different than a different product or when they didn't use one at all? Anyway, additive manufacturers can't simply do a test and post the results without being called a cheater or creating hurt feelings. It's the nature of the beast.

I will tell you that my favorite diesel fuel additives are in this order. Opti Lube, then Stanadyne or JD's branded additive since it's actually Stanadyne.

Watch out for rebranded kerosene. Why pay a ridiculous amount of money for a fancy labeled bottle of kerosene?

Another one to seriously watch out for is alcohol. Alcohol has no business in your extremely expensive diesel fuel system. It's the equivalent of liquid sandpaper. Kerosene has the same effect, just not to the degree alcohol has.

Try dipping your finger in it and rubbing your fingertips together. Is it slippery? Or is it dry and takes away the oils from your skin? That should tell you what's happening to your injection pump.

Just because the bottle says it's good stuff and you see it everywhere, heck your best friend may swear to the stuff claiming no failures and it's the best thing ever, doesn't mean you should actually pour it into your tank.

Do your research. Look beyond an opinion. Look for real data. Don't believe every label and commercial you see.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Jason,

I could not agree with you more. Not because you have stated you like Opti-Lube but for the mythology used to arrive at your concussion.

I spent much time reading forums, asking questions, and listening with an open mind. I did find the report from dieselplace useful since they used a blind research method. I also spoke with local mechanics and others who have first hand experience with diesels.

Most people told me to run, not walk, to anyone with a torch and a set of end wrenches. From the extreme DELETE DELETE DELETE crowd to the tuner boys to the take your truck back to the stone age mentality with different pumps. Add this, delete that. Don't forget to run a 6" exhaust. Let the whole world know you have a small........well, never mind. Lift pumps, CAT filters, chips, 22" spinner wheels. I heard it all.

Cut the BS and get to the problem. ULSD lacks lube. Yep. That simple. Other factors like water, air bubbles, and contaminants are important also. Pro active approach to filter maintenance will also go along way. Unelected, unaccountable and ill-informed government folks has once again put the cart ahead of the horse in hopes to rub elbows with the likes of Wil. I. AM and Leonardo DiCaprio. All while leaving a carbon footprint many times larger with piles of wrecked engines due to corn fuel and low sulfur diesel. Following an agenda rather than using common sense. Other words, business as usual in Washington. Good for the mechanics and tow truck drivers I guess.

I went into my research with an open mind. I was surprised my Power Service was not as good as I thought. No problem. Still a better than nothing solution, I will use it in my '07 Duramax service truck. I will use it in my personal van too if I happen to be out of Opti-Lube.

My truck may fail. If it does it is on me. Some of you may laugh and say I told so. However, I did my part with no shame. I made a choice based on some good information mined from lots of fluff.

isaac
 

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I've been using Amsoil additive. It's getting hard to find. Time to relook at it. Thanks for the info. 2014 Duramax and hoping it's the last one I buy new so I'm like you and trying to make it last, of coarse along with my tractors.
 

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I've been using Amsoil additive. It's getting hard to find. Time to relook at it. Thanks for the info. 2014 Duramax and hoping it's the last one I buy new so I'm like you and trying to make it last, of coarse along with my tractors.
That's the problem around here - what is available. I used to use nothing but Standyne when I was in my TDI hobby. I figured if it was recomended by Bosch it was good enough for me. I had to buy it from places when I was out on the road.

Since then I've been using Power Service - because it is on the self at Wal-Mart and Tractor Supply.

I don't use enough now to buy a case of Stanadyne and cringe to pay the shipping. I only buy 75 gallons of off-road diesel every other year now - and Mrs. C's Beetle Bug uses a whopping 8-10 gallons a year.
 

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I've been using Amsoil additive. It's getting hard to find. Time to relook at it. Thanks for the info. 2014 Duramax and hoping it's the last one I buy new so I'm like you and trying to make it last, of coarse along with my tractors.
Become a dealer or preferred customer and have it shipped to your door.

Or shoot me your order, address, and card info and I will have it shipped to you for the cost of product, shipping, and 2% card fee.
 

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Become a dealer or preferred customer and have it shipped to your door.

Or shoot me your order, address, and card info and I will have it shipped to you for the cost of product, shipping, and 2% card fee.
Might have to do that eventually. Rep at work has been real good, so when he brings our work order he will bring us our personnel order also. The powers to be are talking about a different brand and the Rep is talking about retiring also. So with that not sure how much longer it will be as easy to get. + Less than two years to retirement and I going to have to do something different anyway. Been using Amsoil for 15 years. With all of that, I'll keep you in mind. Thanks
 
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