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Hey all,

Is it feasible to keep a 580/700/1025 outside during both summer and winter? I live in PA, so yes we get a few feet of snow. Am I committing to rapid rust and decline by doing so or are these designed to take outside storage (with a tarp) just like any car would be?
 

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No matter what brand, these newer machines are not made for outside storage. They will quickly rust, fade, deteriorate because of the elements. I would highly NOT recommend it. Get a cheap carport at the very least.
 

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John Deere should sell a cover for the 1 series, they did for the 3025E I have. I paid about $160 for so it's not a cheap but it works great. I had to keep my tractor outside for about year until I was able to build my shop and I used that cover exclusively. My tractor is not all "rusted up". The cover has faded badly so that tells me it did its job of keeping the sun off the tractor. I really recommend it if you have to store your tractor outside for any length of time.

It's a tractor, they can be stored outside. Ever see any stored inside at a dealer? Will the sun/rain/snow eat the seat and other parts? Yes, eventually. It would help if you could build even a lean too or three sided shed to get it out of the worst of the weather but if that isn't in the cards its not a deal killer if you ask me. Storing it outside does make it easier for someone to steal it though.

With the winters, you run a bigger chance of encountering a no start condition due when storing outside due to the battery being exposed to the elements. If you do store it outside in the winter and need to use it, I would let it warm up so you can get the hydraulic fluid warm. Your hoses and pump will like you for that. You may want to consider an oil heater and battery tender to make it easier for you start it in the winter.
 

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I had to keep my 1025r outside for at least a year. I really did not have any alternatives at the time. I did use a tarp, and it stayed in a wooded area, keeping the UV sun expoure to a minimum. I didn't like it, but you can only do what you can. I was working on building a pole barn to house it, and I have a roof over it now.

I would work toward some sort of shelter for it, but if you can't, well... do what you gotta do.
 

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Here's a very recent thread on this, there are many more if you do some searching with the Google in the top right of the header:

Sheltering a 1025R?
 
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You Can get a temporary Garage for Below $200 Garage Tools and Shop Tools at Harbor Freight Probably a decent one to Last More than a Year would cost about $600 or Higher Sheds at Tractor Supply Co. I tarped Tractors In the Past Usually would Have a Mice Nest or 2 as well which Can still happen with a Hard shelter or a soft shelter as well But at least you won't Have as Much condensation Build Up you get By Tarping or covering them with a Tractor cover. Might Just be a Little easier to start out of the wind with a soft shelter. I do suggest Investing in the engine coolant heater for the 1025R though. I now have a insulated Barn That is heated(I don't leave the heat on though). The first year the Barn wasn't Insulated and Had you standard Barn Doors so You had a breeze In the Barn and Had No Problems starting the Diesels even though I had engine coolant heater on them I never use them. But storing outside of In a soft shelter I recommend the engine coolant heater :bigthumb:
 

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We just had a metal-3-side enclosed (with roof) covered parking area installed over a concrete slab. With fall coming quickly, and even though the vehicles are under cover, moisture (dew) to a degree, is still evident. It sure beats full exposure to the elements.
 

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Mine has been outside for four years now. There are a couple of rust spots where paint has been scraped away. The seat, steering wheel and armrests show some fading but none of the body work does. Occasionally I will go around with a piece of sandpaper and some JD Green paint to touch up.

Obviously, anything will do better stored out of the elements. Functionally, it should make no difference, cosmetically it will suffer a bit.

If you do store outdoors, it is extra important to keep it clean. Dirt holds moisture - which leads to rust.
 

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um, they do. I got one with my '18 1025r with my original purchase from my dealer -> the box said it was compatible with the 1 and 2 series, however its pretty snug on the 1025, I can't imaging trying to put it over the larger machine. I'm keeping mine outside under the "car cover" at least until next summer.


John Deere should sell a cover for the 1 series, they did for the 3025E I have. I paid about $160 for so it's not a cheap but it works great. I had to keep my tractor outside for about year until I was able to build my shop and I used that cover exclusively. My tractor is not all "rusted up". The cover has faded badly so that tells me it did its job of keeping the sun off the tractor. I really recommend it if you have to store your tractor outside for any length of time.

It's a tractor, they can be stored outside. Ever see any stored inside at a dealer? Will the sun/rain/snow eat the seat and other parts? Yes, eventually. It would help if you could build even a lean too or three sided shed to get it out of the worst of the weather but if that isn't in the cards its not a deal killer if you ask me. Storing it outside does make it easier for someone to steal it though.

With the winters, you run a bigger chance of encountering a no start condition due when storing outside due to the battery being exposed to the elements. If you do store it outside in the winter and need to use it, I would let it warm up so you can get the hydraulic fluid warm. Your hoses and pump will like you for that. You may want to consider an oil heater and battery tender to make it easier for you start it in the winter.
 

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The dealer in our area has his entire inventory sitting out on the lawn. There must be 35 tractors all look to be series one and two. Nothing is covered rain, sleet, snow, sunshine, what ever Mother Nature throws at them they sit in it all year long.

So unless you are ordering something just shipped in the tractors outside are preweathered.

Being this is a costly tractor to purchase I feel the need to protect my investment indoors when not in use. I hate rust. But like new cars and trucks the tractors can sit in the open out doors for months un-moved or started prior to purchase. Left under the open skies for extended periods the weathering effects will take hold and appearance will degrade.

I’ve no experience on how well they start after sitting for months but an owner will most likely be shorter running frequency.
 

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The dealer in our area has his entire inventory sitting out on the lawn. There must be 35 tractors all look to be series one and two. Nothing is covered rain, sleet, snow, sunshine, what ever Mother Nature throws at them they sit in it all year long.
True, but I would assume the dealer would rotate it's stock and move product, especially at a year old. Most of the one and two series probably move pretty fast, I know that's how it is at my local dealer.

As the other poster said, long term outdoor storage will take it's toll on ANY piece of machinery. Under cover, even a cheap garage in a box, is far better than nothing at all.

EDIT: Also, if you live in a area with frost, make sure you put in some sort of vapor barrier on the floor for a tarp building. The moisture coming from the ground during thaw, etc, can be almost as bad as having it sit outside.
 

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I must be old school as I first built the barn, then lifted the truck, bought the tractor and the boat.:hi:
 

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to be fair: It was going to be tight, *but* if I hadn't let my dealer talk me into the 54" bucket, my 1025 would have fit ever so barely into my shed with just a little high adjustment on the doors. Its an older hunk-o-crap that came with our house. Now I get an excuse to knock it down next year and build something better.
 

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Its not ideal but my 1023e has been outside 90% of the time since February. I'm am building our house and do not have a garage yet. I try to park it under trees for as much shade as possible as the sun will, over time fade the paint. I do not have any rust issues or have seen damage. She has also started without fail every time. The only thing that stinks is the rather cold seat when I first get on her.
 

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to be fair: It was going to be tight, *but* if I hadn't let my dealer talk me into the 54" bucket, my 1025 would have fit ever so barely into my shed with just a little high adjustment on the doors. Its an older hunk-o-crap that came with our house. Now I get an excuse to knock it down next year and build something better.
Then just drop the bucket and park in the shed until you get something else built.
 

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True, but I would assume the dealer would rotate it's stock and move product, especially at a year old. Most of the one and two series probably move pretty fast, I know that's how it is at my local dealer...........
If that’s the case the dealer is getting new stock as fast as they sell them. Since the yard is alway full.

I would think it is like buying a new car or truck a customer looks at the tractors and picks out the one he wants to buy. I can’t envision somebody just laying down his money for a car, truck, or tractor and let the dealer just pick one. In my case I made the selection. Not so with options that had to be ordered or obtained.
 

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Thinking practically...you can store outside. I would take steps to mitigate thing...1) store/park it on a dry solid surface...do not store on grass or low lying area which would have standing water which could allow premature rust from below. Also a good tarp covering the operator station would help extend the plastic/soft materials. Storing it inside it the best option, but if you do need to store it outside use basic common sense. I would also suggest taking off the deck, cleaning and painting the underside of it or storing just the deck inside for winter, since the paint wears away from the underside of the cutting deck.
 
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