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We have a 2018 1025R we bought at the very end of last year. Got the Frontier 2048 brush hog for it. We'd used it for some smaller jobs already, but really put it to work yesterday. Temps were in the low 80's, fairly humid, brush hogging a big field with a fair amount of raspberry bushes and 3' tall grass and weeds. The tractor overheated 2-3 times, from what the wife told me. The grill would fill up, so she'd stop and clean that and the screen out. I ran it for about 20 minutes of the 4 hours, but it didn't overheat on me.

I guess the take away is we have to be stopping pretty regular and keeping the grill and screen cleaned out. But I was still kind of disappointed it is this fussy. There were 5 other tractors with us doing the same work, but all bigger ones with larger cutters. None of them were having big issues. 80's is warm but it's not even summer yet! We'll see a lot of 90's and even a few 100's during the hot months.

Does the above sound fairly normal for the 1025? Or should I be complaining to the dealer? The overflow bottle is a mess from the coolant boiling over, as are the fan blades and inside of the hood and side panels. I'll clean that all up and refill the coolant, of course, but I'm hoping this is not a regular thing. It has not overheated with out 60D MMM while mowing our acerage. At least not yet. We clean the radiator and screens every time we get done mowing.
 

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If you get the “beard” on the tractor, then yes, totally normal. You have to keep that clean for the proper airflow. It’s part of any normal tractor operation. Sometimes it’s easier to find a better or different operational method to keep the chaff from clogging up your screens.
 

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As mentioned, stop every once in awhile and clean the beard off. Piece of advice, you should be doing well before "overheating" occurs, as soon as I see my temp gauge clime above normal I stop and clean mine off. Also depends on what you are mowing as too how often this will occur, some things load up the front quicker than others.
 

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Run with the loader and bucket on, bucket down low. Will that help keep the grill clear?
 

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Run with the loader and bucket on, bucket down low. Will that help keep the grill clear?
Sometimes it is the loader bucket that knocks the chaff off and gets it airborne.

This is just one of "those things".

Like PJR posted, just keep your eye on the temp gauge.
 

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What I was told too.

Run with the loader and bucket on, bucket down low. Will that help keep the grill clear?
I just took possession of my SCUT about a month ago. When it was delivered I asked the driver (other than new units/normal service) Why are you picking up 1025r's? Overheating concerns was one of his examples. So.. I was wondering if you were hogging with the MMM on? He politely said remove to hog to prevent buildup under the machine that restricts out flowing air. He also stated to run: loader on, bucket low and level to knock down debris and "slow" the build up on the screens. When these practices were followed it wasn't really a concern at all and part of normal op. Sounds like he was spot on.:greentractorride:
 

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He also stated to run: loader on, bucket low and level to knock down debris and "slow" the build up on the screens. Sounds like he was spot on.
Yes and no, this is a debate that could drag on for weeks on any tractor forum, and what works for one may not be the best way for another. Way too many variables to say point blank that this is the best advice to give.
What are you mowing?
What time of the year is it?
Is it dryer than a popcorn fart and the field has already gone to seed??

When we cut our fields and pastures we always try to cut the first time well before things go to seed, otherwise you are basically just overseeding the crap that you don't want growing, but along with that, you are cutting before the stuff becomes dry and flighty.

The only 100% sound advice is to watch your temp gauge and clean the front of the tractor and radiator screen as soon as you see the temp gauge climbing above normal.
 

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Thanks folks. Seems it is fairly normal, something we will just have to learn to deal with.

The MMM was not attached, and we tried the bucket at various heights and angles. Didn't seem to make any noticeable difference.

Just got done cleaning it all up and refilling the system. The rad was full to the top still, some ran out when I pulled the cap. So that's good. It only used the amount it takes to bring the tank up to the cold fill line. But we'll watch it more going forward.

I'm a little surprised the cap on the tank is vented. With the overflow line at the top of the tank, it will already breath when it needs to. That's what makes the bigger mess, when it boils out of the tank and gets slung all over by the fan. I'm tempted to seal it. Thoughts?

I was thinking about the bigger tractors. Their grill/rads are further off the ground, so maybe that is part of the reason why they didn't have issues.

Absolutely love the tractor overall. It is so handy to have around our acreage. Just still learning.
 

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I live in Georgia, so I've mowed grass with the mmm for an hour or more at near 100 degree temps with no overheating. So the cooling system design is solid in my opinion. As long as the grill is kept clear you should be good.
 

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I saw a guy on YouTube running a big challenger tractor. Apparently they will periodically, automatically reverse the fan to blow crap off the grill. I wonder if there’s a reversible fan motor you could install. Even if you linked it to a dash switch, it may do the trick. See the gauge climb, reverse the fan for 30 seconds and clear the grill off.
 

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I saw a guy on YouTube running a big challenger tractor. Apparently they will periodically, automatically reverse the fan to blow crap off the grill. I wonder if there’s a reversible fan motor you could install. Even if you linked it to a dash switch, it may do the trick. See the gauge climb, reverse the fan for 30 seconds and clear the grill off.
Or....see the gauge climb, take 30 seconds to get off the tractor and clean the grille.
 

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My 4044M will over heat and it has clogged twice now on the radiator and the grill was fine? I have got fuss on the outside grill before easy to remove. Got to wash or blow out the radiator when they get the fins clogged up with fine dust. The gauge lets me know when it needs cleaning, still getting used to the tractor.
 

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My 4044M will over heat and it has clogged twice now on the radiator and the grill was fine? I have got fuss on the outside grill before easy to remove. Got to wash or blow out the radiator when they get the fins clogged up with fine dust. The gauge lets me know when it needs cleaning, still getting used to the tractor.
I keep a whisk broom in my basket - for my tractor that works perfectly for the outer grille. A couple swipes and off I go.
 

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I saw a guy on YouTube running a big challenger tractor. Apparently they will periodically, automatically reverse the fan to blow crap off the grill. I wonder if there’s a reversible fan motor you could install. Even if you linked it to a dash switch, it may do the trick. See the gauge climb, reverse the fan for 30 seconds and clear the grill off.
There are company’s out there that make them aftermarket, I’m not sure how small the go.
It’s a solid concept—my skid loader is equipped with a reversible fan. It has a 3 position switch ...off—manual rev—auto rev
The fan motor is actually hydraulic
 

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Run with the loader and bucket on, bucket down low. Will that help keep the grill clear?
Actually, with the FEL on and the bucket carried low, its a crucial protection device to avoid running over stumps or other items which could damage the underside of the tractor or of the mower. I ALWAYS run with the bucket low, with the front edge tipped up at about 30 degrees so if the bucket finds a solid object, it won't bring you to a violent stop. But I will know that the tractor found the item.......

I carry a hand held blower in the bucket of my tractor when cutting with the RC2048 and the second the temp gauge is pointing at 12 o'clock (which is far from overheating), I stop and open the hood, pull the screen and clean it and blow off the grill from the inside out. The only real way to clear the debris from the radiator screen area is with the blower or compressed air and its not convenient to drag a compressor around behind the tractor.

As far as the tractor over heating, I cringe hearing the tractor boiled over enough to make a mess on the fan blades, anywhere else under the hood. The operator needs to avoid this happening as its very hard on the tractor to repeatedly do this and in my opinion, the coolant should be replaced if it boiled it enough to actually overflow the overflow tank several times in one afternoon.....

At a minimum, make sure to check the coolant level as chances are it is now low. Also, make sure the operator knows what the dash gauges are telling them as there are warning lights and gauges to prevent damage to the equipment, but if they are largely ignored, that defeats the entire purpose of having them.......

BTW, having Ken's Bolt on Hooks makes a great place to secure the hand held blower while it rides in the loader bucket. Securing it to the hook, it can't fall out and you can't run over it. I have a large twist tie which is used to hold things on ladders and you can tie and untie it repeatedly and reuse it. When you are using the blower to clean the screen, also blow off the rest of the tractor and clean the debris from around the PTO shaft coupler area on the rear to prevent it from winding around the PTO shaft over time.........Plus it helps to give the tractor and mower a look over to make sure everything is as it should be.....................
 

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I just took possession of my SCUT about a month ago. When it was delivered I asked the driver (other than new units/normal service) Why are you picking up 1025r's? Overheating concerns was one of his examples. So.. I was wondering if you were hogging with the MMM on? He politely said remove to hog to prevent buildup under the machine that restricts out flowing air. He also stated to run: loader on, bucket low and level to knock down debris and "slow" the build up on the screens. When these practices were followed it wasn't really a concern at all and part of normal op. Sounds like he was spot on.:greentractorride:
That will largely depend upon the dryness of the material being cut. I often cut the day after a rain or even later in the same day as a rain as the chaff will be significantly less with the moisture in the plants. You can cut the same field and one time have a ton of chaff and another time, very little. Definitely, the dryer the conditions, the worse the debris on the grill, etc. plus the dirtier the machine and operator will get.

Another reason to not brush hog or RC2048 3 point mower mowing with the MMM on the tractor is due to clearance. Another is the drag under the machine going through tall material. Plus, the MMM knocks over the grass before the rear mower gets to it, which makes the cutting result significantly less. You want to hit the field with the weeds and grass standing tall to get the best end cut........chances of getting the tractor stuck in the field when the MMM is on while RC2048 mowing is much, much higher......

Really keep an eye peeled in the tall grass this time of year for Fawns. Often, they will freeze and they haven't developed the "flight response" yet and you don't want to run over any animal with the tractor and mower, let alone such a large animal. Does will leave their fawns usually along fence rows and in shade areas or near trees, but they will also leave them right in the middle of tall grass, so keep a close eye ahead at all times. Those little critters are so cute.....

Below is a picture of what I found while mowing. I found it with the bucket as the Piranha bar caught a piece of the power line which was sticking up and I noticed it right away. There was over 660 feet of power line in that mess of wire. When a tree or limb damaged it, the power company line workers drop the line when they install a new power line. I called them about coming out to get it and they never have. Also, some recycle companies won't take it because they are concerned about where it came from. I think the core of the line is aluminum blend, its certainly not solid copper.......

Here's another reason to run with the FEL bucket down. Take a look at the two photo's of the tall uncut area in the field........then look at the picture of the fire hydrant. The fire hydrant is in the center of both of those uncut areas, if you look very closely, you will see the hint of red paint. Just imagine if you ran into the fire hydrant with the FEL.......or worse yet, with the front of the tractor. It would really tear up some equipment.
 

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On my previous tractor which was a much larger NH Workmaster, I bush hogged with my loader always on and kept the bucket level and down to push over very small saplings and I too had the ole white fluffy floaty cotton stuff in the air that would eventually build up on the radiator screen. I simply would get off and rake it off then keep going. Never over heated. I guess the loader technique could be instituted by you to see what results you get. Hey, its not science all the time.....just what is! Good luck.
 

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On my previous tractor which was a much larger NH Workmaster, I bush hogged with my loader always on and kept the bucket level and down to push over very small saplings and I too had the ole white fluffy floaty cotton stuff in the air that would eventually build up on the radiator screen. I simply would get off and rake it off then keep going. Never over heated. I guess the loader technique could be instituted by you to see what results you get. Hey, its not science all the time.....just what is! Good luck.
Same way I run my bucket using my Brush Hog. Saved my butt a few times stopping before I ran over things finding them this way first!!
 
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