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Discussion Starter #1
So I've been reading online and talking to people and there seems to be a few schools of thought. Background....I'd be restoring the Little Genuis plow I got next spring..
Disassemble And Sandblasting is common to all...

A) Prime all parts. Assemble....Prime again (to cover the fasteners and any nicks/scratches incurred during assembly) and then paint the final color.

B) Prime and Paint parts...paying specific attention to the areas which will not be visible....assemble and paint again.

I can see merits to both methods....any thoughts you guys have?
 

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This is the worst thing for me...I am always unhappy when I paint my projects. I seems to always rush the job and it looks like it. Also, the paint always seems to chip off easily even though I use decent primer and wipe everything down with laquer thinner first. I am going to look for "etching" primer now I think.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
This is the worst thing for me...I am always unhappy when I paint my projects. I seems to always rush the job and it looks like it. Also, the paint always seems to chip off easily even though I use decent primer and wipe everything down with laquer thinner first. I am going to look for "etching" primer now I think.
The cheapest & easiest thing for me is to just drop everything off a local powder coating shop...I cant buy the paint for what they charge me....
BIG difference with etching primer. I painted a few parts on my PR in the beginning with no etch...i can scrape the paint off with a fingernail. On the parts I used the etch...you would think a pro did it. I now use a 3 phase process...etch primer, primer/surfacer, then final coat. My FIL says an epoxy primer is the cats meow...but its expensive stuff. When I finish the primers I have, I plan on trying the Epoxy.

Problem with the powdercoating is on castings/forgings, porosity in the metal causes a finish with tiny little pimples...from 5 feet away you cant tell, but if you rub your hand on it, you can feel it. Plus, i'd like to paint EVERYTHING bolts and all.
 

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Can you tell me what etching primer you used? Trying to find rattle cans for small projects like the cylinder rack I just built.
 

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Can you tell me what etching primer you used? Trying to find rattle cans for small projects like the cylinder rack I just built.
I typically use a spray gun for my big projects...but for spray bomb, you can NOT beat the Napa (Martin Senour) TECnique line..Pro grade stuff, they may not have it in the aisles, but if you ask they will have it.


I also love very much the DuPont version...but its kinda hard to find.
 

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Since I don't have spray equipment, nor a place to paint, I have my stuff powder coated.

As for the methods you listed, I vote for the second one.
 

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I always make sure my rattle cans are made for metal or designed primarily for metal. Especially the primer. Lots of them are made for wood and other soft materials.
 

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I typically use a spray gun for my big projects...but for spray bomb, you can NOT beat the Napa (Martin Senour) TECnique line..Pro grade stuff, they may not have it in the aisles, but if you ask they will have it.


I also love very much the DuPont version...but its kinda hard to find.
Thanks Dave, I will hopefully get some this week.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Depends how old your paint is and what kind of paint it is....If the paint is fairly new, I wouldnt reccomend it as the etch could pull that paint & primer right off. If is older paint which is FULLY Cured (1 year old +) I'd give it a whirl.
 
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