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Discussion Starter #1
I just ordered the Artillian grapple system for my 1025R and decided to include the 24" forks in the package to save $50 in the future. My question is what might be the best fork length for my purpose. Should I have gone with 36" or 42"?

We own 7.25 acres mostly sparcely wooded and plan to put maybe about a half acre into produce for family consumption. The forks will be used mostly for moving small to medium palleted loads and some light digging rocks and stumps.

If you have only the 24" forks do you think you should have gone bigger? If you have the longer ones do you think the shorter ones would have served you better?
 

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i would get the 42's. they do stick out there, but you can see the tips a whole lot better.
 

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IMO, I would have to strongly recommend longer than the 24".
42" can be used instead of 24", 24" will not replace the 42"

BTW, Welcome to GTT.
 

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I just ordered the Artillian grapple system for my 1025R and decided to include the 24" forks in the package to save $50 in the future. My question is what might be the best fork length for my purpose. Should I have gone with 36" or 42"?

We own 7.25 acres mostly sparcely wooded and plan to put maybe about a half acre into produce for family consumption. The forks will be used mostly for moving small to medium palleted loads and some light digging rocks and stumps.

If you have only the 24" forks do you think you should have gone bigger? If you have the longer ones do you think the shorter ones would have served you better?
24" would be best for digging, but I would think they would be too short for carrying pallets. I would recommend getting longer ones since you said "mostly for palleted loads".

Best of both worlds would be 24" AND 42". I got the 36" as a compromise, and because I have tight spaces. I have no issues with pallets, but I can't do much digging with them. Not enough power in the loader to work that far out in front.

Tim
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Actually for palleted loads I mean I would probably make a 36" wide pallet which would work pretty well with the 24" forks to carry bags of fertilizer, soil, etc. I thought the 24" would be best for digging with the limited power of the 1025R. I was wondering if the 36" or bigger would be too much for this smaller tractor.
 

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I had never heard of digging with pallet forks before joining this forum. I come from a history (long ago) in the warehouse business so forks to me are for lifting.

I went with the 36" forks and am more than happy on my 2 series - have never wished I had the 42" nor the 24". Plus, this was Chris's recommendation to me and for once I finally listened to good advise. In my opinion you don't need 42" forks to pick up a 48" pallet - 36" forks work just as well. Same goes for the point of grabbing something out of the back of your pickup. I only have a grocery truck (5'5" bed) and can reach a pallet that is all the way in the front of the bed and grab enough of it to pick it up. If the bed were longer - just grab what you can of the pallet and slide it back until you can get under it properly - easy enough.

Between the 36" & 42" is only 8" difference. While that doesn't seem like a lot it does make a big difference when turning and/or lining up to get under something. Every movement will be much more exaggerated at the tips of the forks the longer they are.

What Chris had recommended to me were either the 24" and 42", or the 36". Since I don't have the ability to easily change the forks the 36" made perfect sense to me and have been very happy I went with that length.

Bigger is not always better.......
 

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I have 42" forks, and I did try "digging" as in trying to get under a few shrubs for transplanting. It was fairly easy to poke the forks in, but there wasn't enough power to curl the shrub up. I do plan to get 24" forks some day, I figure I can get better leverage with the shorter length.

This past weekend, I was moving some logs from our recently cut down tree. The 42's worked well for 3 across just picking them up off the ground, especially since I could see the tips very easily (I didn't want to gouge the lawn too much. I guess 36" would have worked, but I probably could have only picked up 2 logs on each trip.

There is no right or wrong length forks to get, it's just what you intend to use them for. Compromise is a good thing.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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I have 42" forks, and I did try "digging" as in trying to get under a few shrubs for transplanting. It was fairly easy to poke the forks in, but there wasn't enough power to curl the shrub up. I do plan to get 24" forks some day, I figure I can get better leverage with the shorter length.

This past weekend, I was moving some logs from our recently cut down tree. The 42's worked well for 3 across just picking them up off the ground, especially since I could see the tips very easily (I didn't want to gouge the lawn too much. I guess 36" would have worked, but I probably could have only picked up 2 logs on each trip.

There is no right or wrong length forks to get, it's just what you intend to use them for. Compromise is a good thing.

Just my 2 cents.
:thumbup1gif: Had 42", bought the 24" for this building turning project...

Tack Room1.jpg _ Tack Room2.jpg
 

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I got 42" but it really depends what you want them for. I painted the last couple of inches with bright yellow paint for better visibility. Even with that I still clip things when turning in tight spaces. I will say that forks were one of the best implements I ever purchased. Using them with pallets save time and your back.
 

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This project was an Epic failure (the tree died). However, the video does a good job of showing the digging capabilities of the 36" forks.
I had already dug around the tree with the backhoe, and was attempting to pry/lift the tree out of the ground.

Not a perfect demo, but hey, it is worth what you pay to watch it :)

 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks all for the inf, opinion, and experience. Chris at Artillian said that whenever anyone starts asking about digging with the pallet forks he directs them to the 24" tines. I'll just consider buying or making extensions if the need arises.
 

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I have found the 24" work good for making a trench for tile or water pipe.

Doug
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Shipment Received

tmp_29857-FB_IMG_1460126033355342304445.jpg Received my order from Artillian yesterday and immediatly had an opportunity to test them out. They're tearing down the buildings on Main Street, Bronwood, Georgia and we got permission to take posession of this old pre WWII piano. It's been out in the weather for weeks now so it's of no good for the parlor so we're going to spray some polyurethane on it and decorate it with some plants and such. I unpacked the palleted delivery and extracted the pieces to mount the forks. Next thing I knew I was dropping that piano in place, job done.

I'll be installing the hydraulic diverter kit tomorrow morning and start grappling everything in sight. Kudos to Artillian for the faster than expected shipping due to the backorder and for what appears to be an excellent product.
 

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Congrats on the new toys! :good2:
 

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I undersstand that Donald Trump has the 60" ???
 

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I undersstand that Donald Trump has the 60" ???
And of course they are the best most fabulous 60" forks ever :mocking:
 

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Ransx77
I understand that Donald Trump has the 60" ???​
[/QUOTE]And of course they are the best most fabulous 60" forks ever :mocking: jeez-took me a moment to understand that one--tricky-huh!:laugh:

old sarge-did that old piano lift and carry kinda heavy, growing up=I got talked into helping a couple people move their piano's-back then I was pretty strong-but them lousy pianos gave me a run for my money. nice pic too. good luck-I think ur gonna have fun.
 

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old sarge-did that old piano lift and carry kinda heavy, growing up=I got talked into helping a couple people move their piano's-back then I was pretty strong-but them lousy pianos gave me a run for my money. nice pic too. good luck-I think ur gonna have fun.
Apparently oldSarge had Santa helping. :munch: :lol:
 
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Discussion Starter #20
old sarge-did that old piano lift and carry kinda heavy, growing up=I got talked into helping a couple people move their piano's-back then I was pretty strong-but them lousy pianos gave me a run for my money.
The tractor didn't seem to have any problem. We made sure it was secure and centered and only lifted it a ways with everybody clear before preceeding. I was very heavy but I was able to lift one end by myself so I figured the total weight wasn't over the capacity of the tractor. It was a little fun driving the half mile back to the property though, even had the local police cruiser pass me by without notice. The only thing I would have done in hindsight would be to have put a lower strap on it to keep the bottom from sliding out. It did a little be we finished without any incidents.

Rosie did a little research which informed us we are now the proud owner of an antique worth -$150. Minus because it's worthless as it stands but the average haul away fee is $150.
 
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