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Picking them up at the factory is probably the only way...
 
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2014 JD 2032R with H130 loader and 46 BH
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Add whatever you want to the Cart. Then go to the Cart and there is a section to Calculate Shipping based on your zip code.

I noticed for me, the shipping cost is the same whether I just have the forks, or fork, grapple, etc., so they must use some flat-rate freight delivery charge.
 

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You can try calling and getting a quote, sometimes calculated freight is higher then it really is.
 
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Live nearby😁😁😁
I used to go visit Chris at home to pick things up.
 

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Live nearby😁😁😁
I used to go visit Chris at home to pick things up.

Same here. I drive from Western Mass to Boston often. When I ordered my grapple I stopped at the factory and picked them up and did the same with the forks.😁

Steve
 

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Live nearby😁😁😁
I used to go visit Chris at home to pick things up.
Now that they've moved I can pretty much drive my tractor over there and pick up.
 
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When I bought my Artillian pallet forks I got them from Mutton since they were a distributor and I saved on shipping that way.
 
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I work at a distribution business, I don't know what kind of shipping costs they are giving you, but I can tell you that pretty much anything we ship that goes on a pallet is around $150 and up. If they are shipping forks, a grapple or whatever on the pallet, the shipping price will likely be the same or very similar. When shipping freight, it goes by the size of the pallet for Length and Width, then the height of whatever you are shipping... then the shipping costs are also determined by their "class" and there are so many shipping classes for freight that it would make your head spin...

Just figured I'd shed a little insight into the world of shipping to explain for some of the people who were wondering why it looks like a flat rate for shipping etc... if it's super heavy the price will start to climb, but you could ship a pallet full of empty boxes and still pay the "base" rate of a freight shipment, and then ship boxes that weigh a few hundred pounds and pay the same rate... often times the space it takes up on the truck costs more than the weight of the load...
 

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That's good info and appreciated!

Shipping costs of Artillian forks to my location are 40% of what the product costs!

But what the heck, sheathing for my shop build is running $60/sheet now.

I think the term is "new normal..."
 

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I might be crazy but I seem to recall back when I bought my Artillian forks they shipped via UPS. The frame and fork tines shipped separately.
 

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I might be crazy but I seem to recall back when I bought my Artillian forks they shipped via UPS. The frame and fork tines shipped separately.
I think Chris often used FedEx, not UPS.
 

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I think Chris often used FedEx, not UPS.
You could be right. I know it was not shipped freight. A delivery guy came and laid all four packages on the porch.
 
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.When shipping freight, it goes by the size of the pallet for Length and Width, then the height of whatever you are shipping... then the shipping costs are also determined by their "class" and there are so many shipping classes for freight that it would make your head spin...
As a warehouse manager for the last 30+ years I can say that's not entirely true. LTL motor freight is typically priced by the pound based on freight class. The lower the freight class, the lower the rate. The NMFC (National Motor Freight Classification) is the shipping industry's "blue book". Nowadays the carriers also look at what's called "dimensional weight". Each freight class can have a different dim wt. Length x width x height x dim wt factor is compared to the actual ship weight and the larger number prevails. This is because a skid of bricks is much denser than a skid of beach balls. The balls will generally cost more to ship. Also, the more valuable the freight is, the higher the rate. A skid of TV's will cost way more than a skid of bricks.

However, any company paying for shipping to the customer will have negotiated rates with the carriers they use. These rates are usually much cheaper than book rates. Some companies pass some/all of the savings to the customers, most don't. And you, as the recipient, won't ever know.

At my place, our freight rates are discounted 85% from book. 85%! That's because we have fairly dense freight and ship enough volume to make it worthwhile to the carrier.

One thing to keep in mind regarding tractor implements is that, for the most part, they cannot be stacked in a trailer. That makes the rates higher. Add in the additional costs for a residential delivery, and getting a new set of pallet forks shipped to you isn't going to be cheap.
 
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