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Hey all!
In my already boring schedule, I'm planning on building some fence before winter really gets here, hopefully.

My question involves separating horses and cows by the fence.

I'm planning on putting up no-climb horse fence to have my horses in their own pasture vs sharing with the cows. They will be on their own side of the fence. Wondering if anyone has experience with this and which side of the posts would be better for the no climb.

horse fence example.JPG
This is an example of what I plan on building.

I'm predicting 5" wood posts on 10ft spacing with a single strand top wire above the 48" no climb.

Which side would you put the no climb on? I'm thinking the side with the cows as they are more likely to push on it.
My runs are 1700 ft and 700 ft.

cow hors.JPG
 

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That’s the side I would do too, but why not put a couple more strands of electric to eliminate any pushing (I hate that).
 

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That’s the side I would do too, but why not put a couple more strands of electric to eliminate any pushing (I hate that).
I may end up putting a couple strands of hot on the cattle site, but my biggest concern was which side I'd put the no climb on. I can run hot wire real fast after everything else is done.
 

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That’s the side I would do too, but why not put a couple more strands of electric to eliminate any pushing (I hate that).
X2 :thumbup1gif:
 

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That’s the side I would do too, but why not put a couple more strands of electric to eliminate any pushing (I hate that).
X2 :thumbup1gif:
So, I asked this question on a cattle forum too, a couple of professional fence builders are there. They had the opposite recommendation. The no climb is designed to keep the horses hoof from getting stuck, and with it on the opposite side, the horse could paw and get it stuck between the post and fence.

Hadn't even been thinking that way. Now I'll just have to get the hot wires on the cattle side sooner.:banghead:
 

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So, I asked this question on a cattle forum too, a couple of professional fence builders are there. They had the opposite recommendation. The no climb is designed to keep the horses hoof from getting stuck, and with it on the opposite side, the horse could paw and get it stuck between the post and fence.

Hadn't even been thinking that way. Now I'll just have to get the hot wires on the cattle side sooner.:banghead:
I guess that would help prevent the 1000 pound termites (horse) from chewing on the posts :bigthumb:
I’m sold
 

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So, I asked this question on a cattle forum too, a couple of professional fence builders are there. They had the opposite recommendation. The no climb is designed to keep the horses hoof from getting stuck, and with it on the opposite side, the horse could paw and get it stuck between the post and fence.

Hadn't even been thinking that way. Now I'll just have to get the hot wires on the cattle side sooner.:banghead:
The "What Ifs" and "Coulds" will drive ya nuts if you let them.
 

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The "What Ifs" and "Coulds" will drive ya nuts if you let them.
so...................:dunno:ya think that's what's wrong with me then-doc.:lol::laugh:
 

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Would recommend posts on the cow side. If you put the posts on the horse side they will gradually push the fencing out of the staples. If you put the posts on the cow side with the fence on the horse side, the horses will push the fence into the posts and not challenge the staples. The horses are likely to challenge the fence more than the cows.
 

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The "What Ifs" and "Coulds" will drive ya nuts if you let them.
.....and you'll end up with fencing on both sides of the posts! :gizmo:

:munch:
 

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I am stilling figuring out why a cow guy would have horses.:unknown:

Judging from your photo though perhaps you are a horse guy and just trying to better yourself.:laugh:

Keep up the good work.:good2:
 

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Would recommend posts on the cow side. If you put the posts on the horse side they will gradually push the fencing out of the staples. If you put the posts on the cow side with the fence on the horse side, the horses will push the fence into the posts and not challenge the staples. The horses are likely to challenge the fence more than the cows.
.....and you'll end up with fencing on both sides of the posts! :gizmo:

:munch:
Maybe a weave pattern. Fence on the opposite side of every other post.
 

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First off, I'm a cattle guy not a horse guy.

I've never understood why people like high maintenance/effort/expense fencing like that "no climb" you show.

I've never found a fence better than a hot fence. Even when we had "athletic" cattle in the heard that liked to high jump, 8' steel T posts gives you over 6' of height. 2 hots and 2 grounds kept in everything!
Usually just 6' posts so a little under 5' of height with 2 hots and one ground. Put in springs to help when the deer hit it, then buy the most expensive fencer you can buy (Gallagher is my recommendation).

BUT, if you want to use that fence, I would put posts on the cattle side and then just use nail on insulators on the wood posts.
 

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I'd put the no climb on the horse side to protect them and electric on the post side for the moo moos.

I helped my neighbor put up 500+ feet of 48" 4"x2" no climb horse fence for his wife's 4 goats and 2 donkeys. We put the fabric on the animal side, and intended on putting up electric. He hasn't needed electric so far. The donkeys keep any predators away (angry things they are), and the goats haven't had any luck trying to get out.

The farms in Kentucky that had buffalo usually had high tensile wire with a couple electric strands. It was the most economical way to keep larger animals in.

I helped another friend put in 800+ feet of 60" 4"x2" no climb horse fence for a barrel racing horse. We put the fabric on the outside due to the ease of installing the fabric that way. So far, that horse hasn't challenged the fence at all. He's older and pretty tame, though.

I installed 48" 4"x4" goat wire fence around my house to keep the dogs in and the deer mostly out. From time to time a deer jumps in to chew on something or a turkey flies in. The coyotes and neighbor dogs have to dig a bunch to get under it. The bobcats seem to walk the perimeter too. I've only got trailcam pictures of them on the outside, but I'm sure they could hop the fence quite easily if they cared to.
 

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Having horses and cattle. I always would put the no climb on the horse side. They are going to put their heads over the fence. You want them to have to fight the fence posts not the stapes. I've seen horses bust staples a lot. Cows won't challenge the fence like a horse will. Id put a hot wire on top, to keep your fence intact or a board.
 

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This is very nice looking fence build but I don't get it. We've only ever used two strand hot wire for horses and have never had a problem, even when we had a problem with the fencer and wire wasn't hot for a week or so.
 
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