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Discussion Starter #1
Here is what I have to start off -

Asus Essentio CM6730-06
Purchased Sept 2013

Intel Core i5-2320 3.3GHz
6MB L3 Cache

6GB DDR3

Samsung 128GB SSD as boot/OS drive

Original 1TB HDD 7200RPM as data drive

Upgraded 450W power supply (original 300W)

Integrated graphics

Running the latest updated Windows 10 version and Chrome as my browser.

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I've had a love/hate relationship with this desktop since I've had it.

Recent issues:

For the last 3-4 months the CPU fan just screams each time I open a Chrome browser page. Also when working with my photo imagine program (AcdSee Pro 2019) the fan is screaming most of the time. By screaming I don't mean a bearing scream sound - just that it is running in what I would call turbo mode - very fast and loud. It has gotten to the point that I can't stand to use it anymore. Also when using my photo editing program each time I make an adjustment I have to wait around 5 seconds before I can do anything else.

I usually keep up with keeping the case clean on the outside and inside. One thing that gets me with this desktop is there is no case fan. The power supply of course has its own fan - only other fan is above the heatsink of the CPU. I recently took a very good look at everything inside and found only some minor dust particles in the CPU fan which I was able to get mostly clean with canned air.

The last couple days I did the following testing - CPU test with Intel's application - SSD test with Samsung's application - memory test via Windows. All test came back as passed.

So, since I can't find anything really wrong with my very limited knowledge I figure that maybe it is telling me its time to abandon it and move on.

My choices at this point - I look at new desktops at a few vendors. I admit that I am a Dell fan. This is because since I had my first desktop some 20 years ago I've had Dell and never had an issue. The PC's have always been dead quiet. In fact my wife is still using one of my old ones that has to be at least 12 years old.

In my travels looking around it seems desktops have been going away while laptops are very much more popular. I guess this makes sense with the younger people all wanting to be mobile. Trying to make a long story short - because of the popularity and demand of laptops - it seems you get more "bang for the buck" these days with a laptop vs. a desktop.

With that said I just don't want to drop $800 or more on a lower end desktop. I am looking at a bare bones Dell XPS desktop. Trying to stay around $500-$600.

It seems for the $500-$600 you get a lot more for your money with a laptop and that even includes the display.

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Or, my upgrade idea.

I certainly don't trust this PC much now but since the main components all passed their respective tests I thought I would do a couple upgrades. I would put in 16GB of RAM (max according to the documentation) and a cheap graphics card to take the monitor load off the CPU. I can do this for around $150.

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If I do in fact get a laptop I would insist on an SSD boot/OS drive. I would use it primarily at my desk which kind of seems like a waste to me - to use a mobile laptop on a desk. I would get an HDMI to Display Port cable so I can use my nice UltraSharp 1900x1200 60Hz monitor.

It was mentioned in another thread about a dock since I would be using it as a desktop machine. I know docks were easily found years ago but I haven't seen any while looking at laptops the past week or so. I've been looking at the Dell Inspiron line so maybe they aren't made for those laptops?

So what do you all thing? Try the upgrade and see how it goes? Or just abandon this machine and get a laptop?
 

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Ct, I didn’t read this post yet, but here is a dock.



Everything plug into it, and a laptop just snaps in and out if you want to be portable.
 

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I began this year with an HP Envy laptop with SSHD that I got cheap(er) at Sam's Club due to it being a display model with no more on order. Late this spring it developed a very noisy fan which was driving my Mrs. crazy (not a long trip sometimes;) I bought another HP laptop with SSHD that I'm typing this response on. The last half dozen or so laptops that we've owned and that have died pre-mature deaths have almost all been mechanical hard drive related. The solid state drives boot-up way faster, it seems, and have become much cheaper in recent months.

Good luck with your choices,

Brian


Here is what I have to start off -

Asus Essentio CM6730-06
Purchased Sept 2013

Intel Core i5-2320 3.3GHz
6MB L3 Cache

6GB DDR3

Samsung 128GB SSD as boot/OS drive

Original 1TB HDD 7200RPM as data drive

Upgraded 450W power supply (original 300W)

Integrated graphics

Running the latest updated Windows 10 version and Chrome as my browser.

----------------------------

I've had a love/hate relationship with this desktop since I've had it.

Recent issues:

For the last 3-4 months the CPU fan just screams each time I open a Chrome browser page. Also when working with my photo imagine program (AcdSee Pro 2019) the fan is screaming most of the time. By screaming I don't mean a bearing scream sound - just that it is running in what I would call turbo mode - very fast and loud. It has gotten to the point that I can't stand to use it anymore. Also when using my photo editing program each time I make an adjustment I have to wait around 5 seconds before I can do anything else.

I usually keep up with keeping the case clean on the outside and inside. One thing that gets me with this desktop is there is no case fan. The power supply of course has its own fan - only other fan is above the heatsink of the CPU. I recently took a very good look at everything inside and found only some minor dust particles in the CPU fan which I was able to get mostly clean with canned air.

The last couple days I did the following testing - CPU test with Intel's application - SSD test with Samsung's application - memory test via Windows. All test came back as passed.

So, since I can't find anything really wrong with my very limited knowledge I figure that maybe it is telling me its time to abandon it and move on.

My choices at this point - I look at new desktops at a few vendors. I admit that I am a Dell fan. This is because since I had my first desktop some 20 years ago I've had Dell and never had an issue. The PC's have always been dead quiet. In fact my wife is still using one of my old ones that has to be at least 12 years old.

In my travels looking around it seems desktops have been going away while laptops are very much more popular. I guess this makes sense with the younger people all wanting to be mobile. Trying to make a long story short - because of the popularity and demand of laptops - it seems you get more "bang for the buck" these days with a laptop vs. a desktop.

With that said I just don't want to drop $800 or more on a lower end desktop. I am looking at a bare bones Dell XPS desktop. Trying to stay around $500-$600.

It seems for the $500-$600 you get a lot more for your money with a laptop and that even includes the display.

-------------

Or, my upgrade idea.

I certainly don't trust this PC much now but since the main components all passed their respective tests I thought I would do a couple upgrades. I would put in 16GB of RAM (max according to the documentation) and a cheap graphics card to take the monitor load off the CPU. I can do this for around $150.

-----------

If I do in fact get a laptop I would insist on an SSD boot/OS drive. I would use it primarily at my desk which kind of seems like a waste to me - to use a mobile laptop on a desk. I would get an HDMI to Display Port cable so I can use my nice UltraSharp 1900x1200 60Hz monitor.

It was mentioned in another thread about a dock since I would be using it as a desktop machine. I know docks were easily found years ago but I haven't seen any while looking at laptops the past week or so. I've been looking at the Dell Inspiron line so maybe they aren't made for those laptops?

So what do you all thing? Try the upgrade and see how it goes? Or just abandon this machine and get a laptop?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ct, I didn’t read this post yet, but here is a dock.



Everything plug into it, and a laptop just snaps in and out if you want to be portable.
OK - that says for "E series" laptops - will look to see what they are.

Thanks!
 

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I really prefer the reliability of laptops or all in ones these days. Not having to deal with components that I have added/replaced tends to make them just work longer. I used to build my computers, but in most cases it just doesn't seem to be worth the effort these days. Also unless you really need high end GPUs for gaming or work, you don't really need the power that you can get in a desktop.

That said, for those prices you really aren't that bad off replacing your computer every 4 years or so. I may be a bit biased though cause I am a programmer, and my current machines costed $2,700 (laptop) and $6,000 (workstation).

You should confirm if your CPU load is actually high when your fan is screaming or not. Just to rule out malware or some software gone awry. The other issue may be that the thermal paste between your CPU and it's heat sync is likely breaking down over that time. You can get new paste pretty cheap, and replacing it with fresh high quality paste can do wonders in reducing CPU temps. This is something I typically found needs to be done every ~5 years, even with factory assembled machines.

Edit:

Just noticed that you said the case doesn't have any type of fan. That's kinda crazy, you can typically add some case fans to most cases. You want the largest fan your case can accept for both better flow and less noise. Without one, there is no really good way for the heat from your CPU heat sync to leave the machine. It's possible for a case to be fanless if its really really well designed, and matched to the hardware, but that is quite rare.

2017 2038r, 220r loader, 72" MMM, 66" EA Box blade, Woodmax FM-62 flail mower, Artillian forks, JD KBL 6' 1950s discs, subsoiler
 

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OK - that says for "E series" laptops - will look to see what they are.

Thanks!
Yes that is a generic photo. They are somewhat model specific, but I think I paid $45 for the one for my home laptop. It fits most dell’s for a decade.

In a conference room we have a 60” tv with hmdi to display laptops with sound and use a usb mouse and keyboard so it can switch person to person during meetings. The transition is almost seamless even having a visitor jump in and display their part with others viewing remotely.
 

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OK - that says for "E series" laptops - will look to see what they are.

Thanks!
That doc is probably close to 6 years old. It uses a proprietary connector on the bottom of the laptop that was series specific. Example, my D-series would not work on a E-series dock. I don't think they make the E-series Latitudes anymore. It looks like they are moving away from the docs that you slide/set the laptop on in favor of docs that connect via a USB cable. I've had one of the E-series docs for years and I really liked the way they turn a laptop into a desktop but it looks like that ship has sailed.
 

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You should confirm if your CPU load is actually high when your fan is screaming or not. Just to rule out malware or some software gone awry. The other issue may be that the thermal paste between your CPU and it's heat sync is likely breaking down over that time. You can get new paste pretty cheap, and replacing it with fresh high quality paste can do wonders in reducing CPU temps. This is something I typically found needs to be done every ~5 years, even with factory assembled machines.
I was just about to post something similar. Sounds to me like the CPU fan is just trying to cool the CPU. You already said you cleaned the dust off the fan so the next likely candidate for the problem is the heat sink isn't cooling the CPU efficiently. If it's something you're comfortable doing, just remove the CPU fan/heat sink assembly, clean the mating surfaces (rubbing alcohol works well), apply a little heatsink compound to the CPU then reattach.

Check this video-

Don't worry too much about the lack of a case fan as long as the power supply fan is working properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I really prefer the reliability of laptops or all in ones these days. Not having to deal with components that I have added/replaced tends to make them just work longer. I used to build my computers, but in most cases it just doesn't seem to be worth the effort these days. Also unless you really need high end GPUs for gaming or work, you don't really need the power that you can get in a desktop.

That said, for those prices you really aren't that bad off replacing your computer every 4 years or so. I may be a bit biased though cause I am a programmer, and my current machines costed $2,700 (laptop) and $6,000 (workstation).

You should confirm if your CPU load is actually high when your fan is screaming or not. Just to rule out malware or some software gone awry. The other issue may be that the thermal paste between your CPU and it's heat sync is likely breaking down over that time. You can get new paste pretty cheap, and replacing it with fresh high quality paste can do wonders in reducing CPU temps. This is something I typically found needs to be done every ~5 years, even with factory assembled machines.

Edit:

Just noticed that you said the case doesn't have any type of fan. That's kinda crazy, you can typically add some case fans to most cases. You want the largest fan your case can accept for both better flow and less noise. Without one, there is no really good way for the heat from your CPU heat sync to leave the machine. It's possible for a case to be fanless if its really really well designed, and matched to the hardware, but that is quite rare.

2017 2038r, 220r loader, 72" MMM, 66" EA Box blade, Woodmax FM-62 flail mower, Artillian forks, JD KBL 6' 1950s discs, subsoiler
Yeah - the fact of no case fan has always bothered me. All the low end Dell towers I have bought always had a case fan. When I cleaned it I knew it was working as the intake vents had most of the dust.

You could very well have found my problem with the heat sink. I know this will probably make most people cringe but my computer room is one of the few in my house that is not air conditioned. This may have added to the heat sink paste having an early demise.

This is why when looking at laptops this afternoon (looking at Dell) I am opting toward a G5 gaming machine mostly because of the active cooling.

Right now I am leaning toward this machine and would appreciate any input....

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07RGJ4PRJ/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1
 

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I haven't had a ton of laptops over the years, but mine always seem to run hotter natively than the desktops just because everything's so compact to start. And the higher level of video support that you need for your photo stuff is definitely a heat producer. My laptops don't last nearly as long as my desktops. With your ambient temps, I don't think you've pushed any limits by running without A/C; we keep our heat & A/C pretty much 78-80F year round...

If you're not going to be moving a laptop around, I don't see much use for a dock. A USB hub might be useful though. Have you looked at touch screen units? I was surprised how much they've come down in price when I bought my little travel laptop last month.

If it were mine, I'd just add a case fan to your existing box & see if that takes care of the problem since you're not seeing anything else wrong except the overactive cpu fan. Like was said earlier, I'd also replace the thermal paste with Arctic Silver, but suspect with your RA that'll be difficult.

Are you using a HD or SSD? A (HD) spinner can add a lot of heat...

Do you have a util that can report MB temps? Most of the Asus boards that I've worked on have that in the BIOS and usually as a windows app. Might help those with more current tech knowledge than mine if you decide to try a few things before letting the moths fly for a replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I haven't had a ton of laptops over the years, but mine always seem to run hotter natively than the desktops just because everything's so compact to start. And the higher level of video support that you need for your photo stuff is definitely a heat producer. My laptops don't last nearly as long as my desktops. With your ambient temps, I don't think you've pushed any limits by running without A/C; we keep our heat & A/C pretty much 78-80F year round...

If you're not going to be moving a laptop around, I don't see much use for a dock. A USB hub might be useful though. Have you looked at touch screen units? I was surprised how much they've come down in price when I bought my little travel laptop last month.

If it were mine, I'd just add a case fan to your existing box & see if that takes care of the problem since you're not seeing anything else wrong except the overactive cpu fan. Like was said earlier, I'd also replace the thermal paste with Arctic Silver, but suspect with your RA that'll be difficult.

Are you using a HD or SSD? A (HD) spinner can add a lot of heat...

Do you have a util that can report MB temps? Most of the Asus boards that I've worked on have that in the BIOS and usually as a windows app. Might help those with more current tech knowledge than mine if you decide to try a few things before letting the moths fly for a replacement.
I'm running an SSD for my OS and HDD for data. I have the HDD shut off (or sleep) when not accessed after 10 minutes.

I'll take a look to find a utility to keep track of the CPU temps.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I ran this free utility for 2-3 minutes with my photo editing program. I pushed it kind of hard and got the fan to be screaming quite easily as usual.

I had the load on the CPU going between 50% and 95% most of those 2-3 minutes.

I don't know anything about the norm but 99* celcius seems pretty darn hot!

2019-07-12_210640.jpg

Edit to add - ambient temp was 81*F at the time.
 

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I ran this free utility for 2-3 minutes with my photo editing program. I pushed it kind of hard and got the fan to be screaming quite easily as usual.

I had the load on the CPU going between 50% and 95% most of those 2-3 minutes.

I don't know anything about the norm but 99* celcius seems pretty darn hot!

View attachment 695236

Edit to add - ambient temp was 81*F at the time.
Just as a reference, these are the core temps on my laptop, room temp 72*:
 

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I ran this free utility for 2-3 minutes with my photo editing program. I pushed it kind of hard and got the fan to be screaming quite easily as usual.

I had the load on the CPU going between 50% and 95% most of those 2-3 minutes.

I don't know anything about the norm but 99* celcius seems pretty darn hot!

View attachment 695236

Edit to add - ambient temp was 81*F at the time.
That CPU’s max temp is 99C. It won’t let its temp go above that. It will max out the fan then if that doesn’t limit it, then it will start slowing the CPU down to generate less heat.

Being in a 81F room greatly hurts its ability to cool. We have a customer who runs one of our on site servers outdoors under an awning and we regularly see temps around 95F ambient. We had to build a huge case with lots of fans and water cooling to keep it from shutting down due to heat.

You really need case fans when you are running in a warm environment like that.


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2017 2038r 72” MMM Command Cut 220r loader
 

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Here is my $0.02

Since everyone like talking background.. I have been working in the IT field for about 25 years now. Desktop stuff, Active Directory Admin, Network Engineer, Server Admin, SharePoint Admin, Exchange Admin, VMWare Admin and all kinds of other stuff that I don't want to bother typing out. Now specialize in Cyber Security (that is where the big money is at right now) since I have such a wide level of experience in IT from Systems Admin, Network Admin and Development over so many years. So, I get to tell all the people that now do these jobs how to do them better and chase hackers. :nunu: My main work computer is really more a server with an Intel Xeon Processor 32GB of RAM as it runs Win 10 Natively with multiple NICs as I am spanning several networks and then lots of Virtual Machines which are used for internal attacks, assessments and sandboxes for analysis. Pretty much my entire career has been spend working for the Government at all kinds of different levels. (Fed, State and Local) since I am not in it for the money. They have taken care of me though. I am lined up to retire in a few years at 55 with a full pension.

Anyhow. Everyone has a different skill level. There is no workstation level machine that I care about in the least in my house. Any hint of something going goofy, I nuke it. It gets wiped and a custom image is reloaded. Well actually all "desktops" are really just "windows" into a virtual machine which run on a desktop which is more of a server. That is a custom built machine running on a i7-9700K which is water cooled and overclocked. As I upgrade hardware, the Virtual Machines just migrate to new hardware and everything stays up. This will be happening pretty soon as I move to a new i9-9900K system which is overclocked and water cooled like the last. Looking at bumping this one up to 64GB of RAM. Every patch Tuesday the virtual machines get rolled back to the previous snapshot, they are patched and a new snapshot is created. This includes the images for the laptops for the most part as they connect to these Virtual Machines. Then every year all images are rebuilt even if there are no signs of issues. However, when traveling domestically, the laptops are loaded with a couple different operating systems. Windows and a custom build of Linux with an OS option at boot. If traveling internationally it is a hard drive swap with a "Standard" Win 10 build that is running the DOD STIG and that will get nuked upon getting back on US Soil. As for data storage, there is my NAS (Network Attached Storage) which is across a 10GB switch to my main "Server". A local copy of the data and an offsite copy or in some cases multiple offsite copies if it is really critical. My home network more closely resembles a corporate network than a home network. Multiple VLANs for network segregation based on trust level. Multiple ISPs and I think I am up to 20 servers now in a mix of physical and virtual. I say I think because the line really starts to get blurred as you get into Docker and some other virtualization environments. Not the mention light weight but still technically "server" Raspberry Pis.


Alright more on your questions...


Yes, as I mentioned I have laptops in the house but dollar for dollar no laptop can ever compete performance wise with a desktop. Though that gets blurred as you get into these small form factor (itty bittty) "Desktops" which are little more than a laptop with no monitor or keyboard in a bigger less portable case.

You can drop big money on a gaming laptop or spend less on a desktop. Laptops have a use case. The portability is the trade off for loss in performance. My laptops have a use, and that is portability. Can you set up a laptop on a desk and never move it? Sure. Could you have spent less on a desktop with the same specs? Odds are yes. I say odds are yes because there are some cases where you have a very basic user of just surfing the internet and email that might have scored a screaming deal on some laptop on Black Friday that was cheaper than a desktop as they didn't have a keyboard, mouse or monitor.

There are docking stations and port replicators for laptops. As someone mentioned, be very careful with these. They are very likely very proprietary and even if you have one for a Dell, if you change models or generations it will likely go in the trash and be worthless. Where docking stations and port replicators earn there keep is when you have a laptop but are on the go a lot. You have one or two points to disconnect, grab the laptop and run out the door without disconnecting 4-10 wires then trying to remember how to hook them back up when you return. Short of that, don't bother. Again dollar for dollar if you are not going remote, you are wasting money with a laptop.

You have to look at what you are trying to do. If you want to diagnose your machine one thing you could try is run tests against it with a network connection and then run them again with them disconnected from the internet. As mentioned Malware and more recently, crypto miners are becoming very popular. They are using your clock cycles of your processor and graphics cards to generate bitcoin and other crypto currency. If they don't have a network connection, they don't do anything. So that is an easy test. Again, I am pretty far removed from bothering with diagnosing workstation level machines now. I am the prick in the work environment that detects some threat and issues the order to nuke a machine because it isn't worth staff time to save a machine. And yes, I have walked into the C-level offices, grabbed their laptop and walked out the door just saying I will get it back to them as soon as I can and here is your loaner. I am in enough meetings with them that they realize I am not going to do this unless there is a reason. Heck just the other day I got to make the call to have everyone in our organization change their passwords again because of a detected issue. Oh they were thrilled with me too when I changed the minimum password length to 15 charters. When you get down to the home user level this is a little more difficult. You may not have backups or an easy way to store data that you want to keep while you rebuild. A big part of this is related to the fact that Anti-virus now a days is worthless. They look at patterns to identify a threat. I have samples of thousands of live viruses and malware. Give me 5 minutes and I can recompile it into a new variant that no pattern based AV will detect. My recommendation is run Microsoft Defender. Never run as an administrator account unless doing an admin task. At any side of threat, wipe and start over. Paying for McAfee, Norton or any of the others is a waste of time and money.

Is there a chance that the thermal paste isn't adequate? I guess, I don't think I can say I have ever seen a case where a fix was that but heck anything is possible. I don't see that as being an issue that just happens to crop up over a long period of time where the machine ran fine though. It doesn't break down like that ooze out. If it wasn't applied properly in the first place that is one thing but you would think that would have presented itself sooner.

As far as replacement machines. My most common response to family members looking for something "off the shelf". I have been a fan of Dell Machines but I would always stick to the corporate line. I typically recommend Precision, and Latitude line machines. They often don't cost that much more and they have better warranties than the home line like the Inspiron. Unless you have a special need where you might need to deviate from that guidance.

As for all-in-one machines. Meh, They are hard to justify. They are a laptop that isn't portable but is wall mountable. I would rather get a monitor with an Intel NUC Strapped to the back. Or I will just 3D print a holder for it. Also when they are dated or fail, nothing like having to throw away a perfectly good monitor. I prefer to minimize E-Waste.

TLDR: Rebuild the OS. Buy a new desktop.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
That CPU’s max temp is 99C. It won’t let its temp go above that. It will max out the fan then if that doesn’t limit it, then it will start slowing the CPU down to generate less heat.

Being in a 81F room greatly hurts its ability to cool. We have a customer who runs one of our on site servers outdoors under an awning and we regularly see temps around 95F ambient. We had to build a huge case with lots of fans and water cooling to keep it from shutting down due to heat.

You really need case fans when you are running in a warm environment like that.


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2017 2038r 72” MMM Command Cut 220r loader
I just ran the CPU temp utility this morning - it is now 72*F in the computer room. Didn't seem to make any difference....

2019-07-13_062203.jpg
 

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First of all, Chrome and a graphics program both do the same thing... suck up all the available RAM and push the CPU to new limits under specific loads. In other words, I am not at all surprised by the fact that your machine shows that it's being "stressed" in those two specific scenarios.

If the noise from the fan is PURELY from air movement, and you've never heard it before, then this is truly odd. My guess, though, is that it's actually the bearings failing. Contrary to the suggestion to "replace" the thermal compound between the CPU and the heat sink (there's no reason to ever touch this stuff unless you're purposefully separating the heat sink and the CPU for another reason), I would suggest that you simply get a new CPU fan.

At the same time, here are some additional things to think about.

Solid State Drives have a specific finite life to them. They are all rated based on what the expected "P/E", or Program/Erase, limits are. In other words, every single time you write data to a SSD, you are damaging it and causing it wear and bringing it closer to failing. This is different than the mechanical "spinning" drives that are more prone to dying simply because of the number of hours they are powered up and spinning.

NEVER EVER "format" (unless there is a very good reason) or "defrag" a SSD. These processes cause wear on the drive and a "defrag" of an SSD does ZERO to improve your computer's performance because data is not accessed like on a mechanical drive.

At six years old, your drive may have a reasonable amount of "wear" on it. And, while you see it as your OS drive, it's really the "everything BUT my data" drive. To put it another way, failure of this drive is complete death of the entire machine. Yes, your data is still in tact on the data drive, but all programs are now gone as well as the OS.

Find the model number of the drive and look it up to see if it is a SLC, DLC, or MLC technology. More importantly, see if you can A) find the spec sheet that gives you the expected P/E information and B) see if you can find a utility that can give you an estimate of the number of P/E cycles already seen and whether there are any failed cells (and how many).

The imminent failure of that drive alone could be reason enough to look at a new system.

As has already been said... Laptops do not perform like desktops. Period. Ever. The hyper dense "packing" of components into such a small case means reductions in heat dissipation and heat is the biggest enemy of electronics. Can you find a laptop to do what YOU need it to? Probably. But the price is absolutely going to be higher than the same performance out of a desktop.

PC's have come way down from the thousands and thousands of dollars that it cost to get one when they were a shiny new toy. But, we've largely hit the bottoming of the pricing a number of years ago. The advancements in capabilities will keep drawing in new purchases, so the price "is what it is." What's troublesome in buying a machine these days is that one area will appear to be very high performing (like a great CPU) only to be massively hindered by another component (like a slow hard drive). Quality products cost money, and building a good machine from quality products passes that expense on to the consumer.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Not sure if this is what you are looking for meburdick -

It's a Samsung SSD 840 128GB

Here is an overview of specs - center column for the 840 -

2019-07-13_085842.jpg

I just ran the benchmark operation in the Samsung utility -

2019-07-13_085911.jpg
 

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While laptops don’t perform like desktops, if he has kept a desktop for 6 years he really doesn’t need top notch performance. A reasonable laptop might be fine for his uses. Web browsing and photo editing really isn’t that intensive of work. That doesn’t mean that Chrome or your photo editor won’t use 100% of your CPU at times. Plus with a laptop he could move into the house with AC when it’s hot in his current work area.

If you open the case and use it does it run any cooler? I still think adding a case fan would be the cheapest/easiest thing you can try.


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First of all, Chrome and a graphics program both do the same thing... suck up all the available RAM and push the CPU to new limits under specific loads.
Kind of what I was saying back in GM.

I would suggest that you simply get a new CPU fan.
Duh. How could I not have posted the obvious? This would be my #1 tinker-fix.

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So far, it sure sounds like others share my a laptop is a heater sentiments. They can be great when you need mobility, but doesn't sound like that's your case.

sennister lists why I keep my "real" work on a private lan and not connected to the web. I view my web box as a temp with rinse and restore from backup if anything weird shows up. Sneaker net with a flash drive for the twice a month I have to copy text files from web to work boxes. It can be a dangerous world out there.

Good luck, CT.
 
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