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Discussion Starter #1
I recently made a hasty decision to sell my vintage peavey (which I still occasionally use). It was well used and poorly taken care of before I acquired it along with some other peavey parts.
1A ORIGINAL PEAVY.JPG
1B DAMAGE.JPG
1C DAMAGE.JPG

I decided to use this peavey hardware to build a replacement tool.
2A NEW PEAVY HARDWARE.JPG
I am able to trace the history of this hardware to a timber company that had a sawmill within 3 miles of my home. The mill has not operated since 1917. The company owned the mill, the town, the timberlands (115,000 acres), the railroads, and the valley and still owns the timberlands today. They had a company store in the town that operated until 1940 when the town was sold to the Corp of Engineers for a flood control project. This, along with many other tools, were moved from the store to the company manager's rebuilt house (he was frugal), outside the flood plain, when the town was demolished. A friend of mine now owns the house and he gave me a number of these tools that were still in the basement when he bought it.
While it has some rust on it, there are no signs that it was ever used. Even what is left of the handle shows no signs of use or abuse, other than the handle being neatly cut off from the hardware (did someone need a handle quickly for another use and this was the only thing in the store inventory that filled the bill?).

2B UNASSEMBLED.JPG
2C PIKE POINT.JPG
The pike tip came out very easily by clamping it in a vise and spinning the tapered metal cuff with its grab hook. Then the remainder of the wooden handle popped out with some light blows of a hammer. I was surprised to see the way the pike point was made with a taper to help wedge the wooden handle into the metal cuff.

3A HANDLE BLANK.JPG
I found an old white oak 3 X 4 that was long enough that had been used as a stud in an old barn. I cut it to rough length of about 48", jointed two adjacent faced, planed the second face and ripped it into a square. All the while trying to remove as many defects a possible. I then laid-out center lines, taper lines and the location of the end of the tapered metal cuff on all the sides. Using a 20" band saw, I cut the tapers on all four sides.

3B ROUGHED TO OCTAGON.JPG
Using a drawknife, I then cut-off the corners to create an octagon shape.

3C CORNERS ROUNDED.JPG
Using a outside curve spoke shave, the lengthy task of rounding all the corners off to create the rounded shape began.

4A PLANEING HANDLE STRAIGHT.JPG
To help keep the handle a true as possible (especially on the tapered metal cuff end), I needed to create reference surfaces with a hand plane.

I would have liked to have turned this on a lathe but my lathe only has a capacity of 36" and the handle needed is 48", and anyone who has used a peavey or cant hook on a large crooked log knows you need as long a handle as possible for good leverage.
 

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Truer words were never spoken

I recently made a hasty decision to sell my vintage peavey (which I still occasionally use). It was well used and poorly taken care of before I acquired it along with some other peavey parts.
View attachment 578513
View attachment 578521
View attachment 578529

I decided to use this peavey hardware to build a replacement tool.
View attachment 578537
I am able to trace the history of this hardware to a timber company that had a sawmill within 3 miles of my home. The mill has not operated since 1917. The company owned the mill, the town, the timberlands (115,000 acres), the railroads, and the valley and still owns the timberlands today. They had a company store in the town that operated until 1940 when the town was sold to the Corp of Engineers for a flood control project. This, along with many other tools, were moved from the store to the company manager's rebuilt house (he was frugal), outside the flood plain, when the town was demolished. A friend of mine now owns the house and he gave me a number of these tools that were still in the basement when he bought it.
While it has some rust on it, there are no signs that it was ever used. Even what is left of the handle shows no signs of use or abuse, other than the handle being neatly cut off from the hardware (did someone need a handle quickly for another use and this was the only thing in the store inventory that filled the bill?).

View attachment 578569
View attachment 578577
The pike tip came out very easily by clamping it in a vise and spinning the tapered metal cuff with its grab hook. Then the remainder of the wooden handle popped out with some light blows of a hammer. I was surprised to see the way the pike point was made with a taper to help wedge the wooden handle into the metal cuff.

View attachment 578649
I found an old white oak 3 X 4 that was long enough that had been used as a stud in an old barn. I cut it to rough length of about 48", jointed two adjacent faced, planed the second face and ripped it into a square. All the while trying to remove as many defects a possible. I then laid-out center lines, taper lines and the location of the end of the tapered metal cuff on all the sides. Using a 20" band saw, I cut the tapers on all four sides.

View attachment 578657
Using a drawknife, I then cut-off the corners to create an octagon shape.

View attachment 578665
Using a outside curve spoke shave, the lengthy task of rounding all the corners off to create the rounded shape began.

View attachment 578673
To help keep the handle a true as possible (especially on the tapered metal cuff end), I needed to create reference surfaces with a hand plane.

I would have liked to have turned this on a lathe but my lathe only has a capacity of 36" and the handle needed is 48", and anyone who has used a peavey or cant hook on a large crooked log knows you need as long a handle as possible for good leverage.
Amen to those words. Leverage is key. I've never done a peavey but have rebuilt cant hooks. Dogwood also works pretty well.

Treefarmer
 

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I like what you have done. I used one of those many many times back in the late 70s on power poles when I worked on power lines back in Nebraska.
 

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I had a peavy years ago. I took the hook off it and a fabricator friend made one of these log lifters for me with it. Awesome for getting logs off the ground when cutting firewood.

Of course that was before I had a tractor, loader, and forks.......

666675CF-E18F-4DA2-9FF9-34B90CA8AFA2.jpeg
 

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The Peavey tool is still being made in Eddington, Maine, They offer a variety of hardwood pieces, including commemerative walking sticks which Galen Cole and the Cole Transportation Museum in Bangor has been giving them to veterans at the start of the Bangor Veterans Day parade for almost 20 years now.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Completed Peavey

Over the Easter Holydays I completed the peavey project. When fitting the tapered metal cuff, I found out that it was cast iron with a slight oval shape that would have still needed hand fitting even if it had been turned on a wood lathe. Imperfections in the wood were filled with polyester resin after the handle was fitted and shaped, then the pike point hole was drilled using various diameter bits to create a series of stepped holes to match the diameter changes in the shaft of the pike point. The tapered section of the hole was faired with an in-channel firmer gouge (this operation went better than expected even though the cutting was against the grain) and then the pike point was inserted into the hole and spun with a drill to lap it into the hole to an acceptable depth (this forging was rough enough to grind away the wood as it was spun to get the fit needed). After final sanding of the handle and abrasive brushing and painting the tapered cuff and hook, the parts were assembled. Watco Natural Oil finish was applied to the handle and the pike point to complete the project.

The company that manufactured the metal parts was on the hook. "WARREN AXE & TOOL CO."
9-IMG_2933.JPG

"WARREN, PA" was cast into the metal cuff.
10-IMG_2935.JPG

The finished and fitted metal parts.
8-IMG_2934.JPG

The completed peavey waiting to be used.
11-IMG_2932.JPG
 

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Good job! Seeing the background in those shots - I'd like to get a shop tour....:good2:
 

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That's pretty cool! I would have done the same thing...made my own handle! I had a friend that was going to build a cannon...yeah a real one. His brother worked at a machine shop. He was trying to figure out how he was going to make wooden wheels, when I told him I'd make some. having read and owning several of the Foxfire books, I had one that detailed how they made wooden wagon wheels. I set out to make him a set of wheels and got one almost completed when he told me he gave up on the idea. I'll have to post a pic of that sometimes...The hub was carved out of an old oak 4x4 and I made the spokes and wooden wheel that would be attached. It's a neat conversation piece I show to people sometimes....oh and the gun stocks I've made too.....gonna make a lamp out of one of them one day.....
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
GUS FINK,
Thanks for the helpful info on the difference between these two types of log turners, I'm sure some viewers were wondering about the differences.

Fungus,
The Foxfire Books have served there purpose in preserving proven knowledge of skills that may have otherwise been lost such as wheel making.
I've also make some gun stocks; mostly for break action guns; and used several gunstock making techniques while making the peavey handle.

Rope_Chucker,
I'll try to post some additional photos of my wood shop for you. I also like to search the backgrounds of pictures in the forum, especially those from other countries.

Mark
 

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Fungus,
The Foxfire Books have served there purpose in preserving proven knowledge of skills that may have otherwise been lost such as wheel making.
I've also make some gun stocks; mostly for break action guns; and used several gunstock making techniques while making the peavey handle.
I read the first Foxfire book when I was in Jr. High - mid 70's. I liked it so much that I checked out Foxfire 2 and that Christmas I was given the 3 volume set of Foxfire books in paperback (in their own cardboard display box). I still have them! And, along the way I picked up Foxfire's 4, 5 and 6. The Foxfire book (in paperback) was priced at $3.95. By the time I bought Foxfire 6, inflation had crept in and the price was $7.95! :laugh: I think they released three more volumes since then. I might have to finish my collection. A great set of knowledge in those books!

Several years ago I used to spend a lot of time in Georgia. I liked to make my way up to the North Georgia mountains, in Rabun County, where the school was. Besides the Foxfire books, Rabun County is also where "Deliverance" was based. :laugh: Beautiful country!!
 

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Nicely done! And without a lathe :bigthumb:

I have a massive love for peaveys and cant hooks as one who processes the bad logs into firewood and the good ones into boards for my own woodworking. Although the tractor grapple sure is an easier peavey ;)
 

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Gotta argue the part about both tools being equal. I used a peavey on the wood mill twice and hated it. The cant hook is unbeatable for turning square logs. And the cant hook doesn’t work well with the peaveys lifting bracket. So, I would argue the peavey is for bucking while the cant hook is for milling.

It is like the screw vs the nail. They both do essentially the same thing, but they both have better applications for doing that same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Good job! Seeing the background in those shots - I'd like to get a shop tour....:good2:
Rope_Chucker,

To understand the layout of the shop, it's important to understand its location.

1-IMG_2974.JPG
My wood shop is located in an enclosed wrap-around porch (complete with sloping floors). It's the area with all the windows that forms the closest corner of the house (the house was built when the "Prohibition Amendment" was repelled, as a bar and hotel).
When we moved in, this space had an upright piano sitting in it, two 10" plus holes in the floor where trees originally were built into the structure, 120 volt outlets only on the outside walls, and a leaky roof that had caused some structural problems.

1-IMG_2966.JPG
This is the bench and hand tool area. Just recently covered walls under the windows and installed LED tube lights. The shop has been a work in progress for the last 41 yrs. What is done in it is more important then what is done to it.

2-IMG_2967.JPG
Storage for tools and hdwr. The cabinet was designed around doors that were stained the wrong color when I worked in a cabinet shop.

3-IMG_2968.JPG
Display of personally important, proven technology.

4-IMG_2969.JPG
The outside corner of the shop. The shaper is a real workhorse for much of the work created in the shop. The stock feeder was bought while I still had (and still have) all my fingers.

5-IMG_2970.JPG
The machine area of the shop. It's 40ft long by less than 8 ft wide; Many times I have to go outside just to turn a board or change my mind!! The color change in the floor is where I spliced t&g red oak flooring into the original red oak flooring. Why it ended where it did is a mystery; the rest was originally completed with mixed pine t&g. The oak flooring strips have 11 different widths and was made from trees from my firewood forest.

6-IMG_2971.JPG
The shop also doubles as a trophy room.

7-IMG_2972.JPG
A 12in jointer, W-H molder, pre-WW2 Delta shaper and Boise-Crane 12in planer.

8-IMG_2973.JPG
Rockwell/Delta pattern makers lathe, home built cyclone for the ceiling mounted dust collector. The black metal plates are JD mower mounting plates being converted into mmm combo bracket for my 2520 (hopefully the subject of another topic)

Many times there is not enough space in the shop to assemble a project and that has to be done outside or in the basement. If possible I try to sand outside to keep dust to a minimum in the shop. If I'm forced by the weather, I'll apply a brushed finish in the shop. But my preferred method of applying finish is to spray it. I've sprayed finish when the temp is as low as the high 40's. Of course the pieces are taken from a heated space, sprayed, and returned to the heated space to flash-off and dry. It takes time and planning to work around the limitations of the work space to create a project. The work space is not my goal but the creation of something that someone truly appreciates.
 

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:bigthumb: whew-u have a lot of nice tools there. very nice:good2:
 

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I like it! Thanks for taking the time to post the shop tour - much appreciated. Looks like a great place to work & spend time. Really like all the windows and natural lighting.
 

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I like it! Thanks for taking the time to post the shop tour - much appreciated. Looks like a great place to work & spend time. Really like all the windows and natural lighting.
Yeah - what he said!! :bigthumb:

What a gorgeous place with a really cool history behind it!
 
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