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In another thread we discussed soaking the trimmer line in water to stop it from melting together and to keep it flexible. I asked the question of Stihl on their facebook site and they answered. :thumbup1gif:

Stihl said:
STIHL USA Nylon is a hygroscopic material and if the line is stored in dry conditions, e.g. in a shed or a warehouse it can loose its moisture and therefore its flexibility, it can become stiff, brittle and break easily. Storing it for a couple of days in a closed bag with some added water at room temperature or higher will bring the line back closer to the original, more flexible condition and should significantly reduce breakage due to brittleness.
Guess who is going to soak his line in water tonight. You never know how long the line you purchased was on the shelf or stored, so this would be a good idea for even new line.

Check out Stihl's facebook site for info on other items. https://www.facebook.com/stihlusa
 

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I did it last week after reading the article I posted about string reviews. Made a huge difference to a 3+ year old spool of line. I mean HUGE.

Normally I wouldn't have line around that long but it was during the time we built our house and we was living in a townhome where they lawn was taken care off.

I was thinking about buying a super large spool of it but think I will stick to the smaller/fresher versions. I am out now so need to make a trip to the JD store for more.
 

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I picked up a spool of the Stihl 0.105 line last night and have to admit, it is as flexible as the red licorice whips. I'm still going to soak it until I rewind the trimmer head Friday.

Oh, when I was getting the line I mentioned to the salesman that I hated string trimmers because the line always melts for me and I heard this Stihl Premium line was a good choice. He told me the line wasn't my problem if it always melts, he said it was because I just jam the trimmer into the weeds and keep plowing through without swinging the trimmer back and forth. I told him that is pretty much what I do, but why would it matter? He said it is because the trimmer head needs some airflow so it doesn't heat up and cause the line to melt. If you just jam it into the weeds instead of swinging it through, the head will overheat. I don't know how much truth there is to it, but I am going to try it next time. It couldn't hurt, and it could be the reason I hate string trimmers so much. If it works I will be a happy camper. :)
 

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Andy,

Something to keep in mind (according to the pro's) is you should always be cutting with the end of your line. So swing an arc side to side if you are doing large areas and just try to cut with the tip of string.

If you just jam the line into the weeds where you are working off the sides of your line you are doing it wrong according to those that do it for a living !

From what I have read most professionals say that if you are doing it right it doesnt matter if you use the square line or round line because you are using the tip.

I dont have enough experience to say one way or the other. Just sharing what I have read/heard.
 

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WOW, very cool. Water it is for me as well than!
 

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I don't think putting your line in a zip lock frezer gallon bag with some water in the bottom is soaking. I have had the melting in the spool but never breaking due to brittleness. The smaller lines have less air drag, the sharp edeged stuff I have used I think brand named pulverizer worked suprisingly well. The 36cc one was too powerful for the hit the ground to extend the line and I use a manual one and usually go two notches and pull on the line which usually doesn't stick but if it does it usually can be broken free by pulling. If melting is the issue maybe old dried out line is the way to go.

fran
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Fran,
There was another thread where a person who takes care of a large cemetery suggested soaking your timmer line overnight in water. My snip from Stihl does not say to soak it, but they assured me it would do nothing but good for the line.
 

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In the fishing industry lines of these sizes are used. gnerally sold by tensile strength not diameter. Say for swordfish or tuna long lining the main line might be 800 lb similar in size to what one sees on those four cycle engined devices on wheels. The drops from main line are in the 400 to 500 pound tensile range, smaller than the 0.095 thousands stuff I was using on monday. The stuff used on the sea floor for other species is generally smaller. So I won't argue about hurting the line. If the frustration lies in melting of the line in the spool as it kind of sinks into the other coils and stretches and relaxes with varying loads I will contend you don't want it softer. I burned two gasoline tanks on Monday with quite old clearish white 0.095 plain round and had no melting issues and wearing back issues come from woody plants and wire fencing and rocks and concrete. I don't know if it is 12cc the one I was using it has 12 in the model number.

fran
 

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I don't recall the brand of my string trimmer line, but it's a large spool and has a small sponge glued to the container in the middle of the spool.
The directions say for best results to keep sponge moist.
 

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When I was reading through the paperwork that came with the DR trimmer I inherited, It also said to soak the line. Dried line was easier to split it said? So since I knew the line I had gotten with it was SEVERAL years old, I threw it in a bucket for a couple days filled with watter. It did do a better job at holding up the next time I abused it.
 
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