Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 45 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,502 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Am I the only one that is bothered by the whole "rehoming" fee movement? If you want to sell an animal just admit it and put your price out there.

So tired of these people that "can no longer keep" an animal but to make sure the animal receives its "forever home" there is a "rehoming fee".

Complete and udder bull...do do
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,593 Posts
Re-homing Fee.

:lolol:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,400 Posts
Never heard of it. We have shelters that people can drop off an unwanted pet and they charge a pretty good fee to adopt the pet but Re-homing fees? What's next? Naw,,, I'll stay away from that one,, I'm with Randy on this!!!! :dunno:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,502 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Here is an example

Australian Cattle Blue Heeler female

Australian Cattle Blue Heeler female, NKC, blue motley, 18 weeks. Vet checked, all shots including rabies, very hyper working dog. Crate trained. Large rehoming fee to insure forever loving home. We will remove ad when no longer available.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,067 Posts
Yeah, imagine how my daughter felt when the shelter was going to charge her $75 for a rabbit, and she would have to complete two forms and undergo a home inspection.

Needless to say, she bought a wonderful bunny from a local breeder for $15.
Don't get me started on animal rescues...:flag_of_truce: :banghead:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
498 Posts
Don't get me started on animal rescues...:flag_of_truce: :banghead:
Yeah... me too:banghead:

I've had very bad experiences with some "rescue" groups. Specifically those who specialize in certain breeds. It is my opinion that many of these just exist to allow people who want that breed themselves and supplement the cost through non-profit status and donations. I've seen dogs "fostered" for years when I know there has been interest in adopting the animal. Some of the conditions they apply to adoptions, specifically ones where their position is they still effectively own the animal and unless you meet their criteria... including informing them if you move etc. they will take the animal from you, are way out of line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,433 Posts
Yeah, imagine how my daughter felt when the shelter was going to charge her $75 for a rabbit, and she would have to complete two forms and undergo a home inspection.

Needless to say, she bought a wonderful bunny from a local breeder for $15.
home inspection? what? and ill bet a rabbit emergency plan, too.

btw, 'bunny' is an improper noun.:lolol:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,400 Posts
The wife went to a shelter to get a new cat for our aging cat because its buddy died,, not only was it expensive, we were told we had to bring our house cat to the vets for shots, they wanted to see our house to make sure it met their regulations, the cat was 175 bucks plus all those forms and three references so they could call to see if we were fit for the cat!!! :nunu:... Needless to say, one of our outside cats became the new inside friend! for free and it was fixed.. They have a catch and release program in this area,, you see a clipped ear and you know it has been fixed and put back in the population.. Shelter cat my A$$... I will say this, the owner of the shelter lives in a dump and they have the nads to want to see our house! Not on my friggin life.. She wouldn't even be let in the yard! Stuff your shelter up Mikes!
 

·
Bonehead Club Lackey
Joined
·
10,265 Posts
It used to be an animal shelter gave away dogs and cats. Now you have to pay for the pet and have it nurtured and pay for shots, even if it already has them. To many ways to get them for free around here. If I have them nurtured it's because I want it that way and if I have them get the shots at least I'll know they got them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,788 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,004 Posts
....I'll still use shelter for pets.

Our last three dogs have been shelter/rescue animals. Stella, our dog now was in training for search and rescue but she flunked out for starting fights. image.jpeg . image.jpg

I wouldn't use a breeder - there are too many really good animals that are available. The rehoming fees are new to me, so yeah, I would beware of those deals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,912 Posts
Our greyhounds have all (six over the last 10 or 12 years; we currently have two) come from a greyhound rescue for retired racing dogs. They have a fee (I think $100), but we don't mind paying it to help other racers find homes. We also have a part shepherd mutt who came from a rescue. If I recall the charge for him was $100. They are all well worth the fee when I come in the house from work. The dogs are always happy to see me.

My wife and a neighbor girl also traps stray cats in the neighborhood to get them to the vet and get them spayed or neutered. It is a big job but they enjoys helping the animals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
And I thought it was just me.

I'm with you '56 Ford Guy!

I've taken in several dogs in my life who needed a new home for whatever reason. I love dogs. I enjoy miniature schnauzers the best. I wanted this one that was at a shelter, owner surrender. There was a $75 fee. Whatever. The shelter was about 2 1/2 hour drive away so I called first after I verified she still was on PetFinder. Nope-just adopted out. The next day, the same dog with the same picture was on PetFinder by a rescue group by now they need $425 for her due to all the vet checkups etc she 'had'.

Tried another schnauzer rescue for a 9 year old female. The fee was reasonable but they had like a four page application for me to fill out. I left most of it blank, especially the parts about if I worked full time, and if so how many hours away from my house I was per day etc. They called and asked for the information. No. If you want to talk to my vet fine. But I do not know who looks at these apps, and how secure is my private information is. If I tell you I'm gone 10 hours a day and no one is home, some pot smoking flunky boyfriend of one of your helpers can kick my door in and rob me knowing that a friendly familiar dog is the only thing on the other side of the door. No thanks. Especially since schnauzers usually die around 12 years old.

They called me back a day later and said I could have the dog minus the information I left off since they where overcrowded. No thanks. I hated to do that for the dogs sake but screw them. Breed specific rescues DO NOT HAVE THE ANIMALS BEST INTEREST IN MIND.

Whew-sorry for the rant.

isaac

PS-I have heard all the excuses in the world to why the want home visits etc. Again, my vet should be sufficient.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
Yeah, imagine how my daughter felt when the shelter was going to charge her $75 for a rabbit, and she would have to complete two forms and undergo a home inspection.

Needless to say, she bought a wonderful bunny from a local breeder for $15.
$75, 2 forms and a home check for what barely makes a nice dinner? $15 is too much IMHO, nice eating rabbits go for ~$8 each here, I have no use for a pet that is also food, especially better food than they make pets...:mocking:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
498 Posts
Our greyhounds have all (six over the last 10 or 12 years; we currently have two) come from a greyhound rescue for retired racing dogs. They have a fee (I think $100), but we don't mind paying it to help other racers find homes. We also have a part shepherd mutt who came from a rescue. If I recall the charge for him was $100. They are all well worth the fee when I come in the house from work. The dogs are always happy to see me.

My wife and a neighbor girl also traps stray cats in the neighborhood to get them to the vet and get them spayed or neutered. It is a big job but they enjoys helping the animals.
I don't want anyone to get the wrong Idea. There are GREAT rescue organizations out there... And there is an expense involved. My current Dog (Titan) came from a breed specific rescue (German Shepherd) I paid a 250 dollar fee to get him which was reasonable to my mind. That was 9 years ago and he is still going strong (After a $3000 surgery when he was 9 months old, I had only had him for about 6 weeks).

My particular problem is many of these rescues place such unreasonable restrictions on adoption, and are not flexible at all, which limits the number of potential good homes these animals could go to.

If they were truly looking for "forever homes" for these animals they should be more accommodating of situations out of the norm and evaluate them on an individual basis.

Here is an example of recent (within the last year) experiences I had... which has driven me to get my next dog/s from a breeder:

I am looking for 1 or 2 buddies for me and my current dog. I am looking specifically for German Shepherds. I have a lot of experience with them and they are the dog for me. My current dog is a Shepherd, as mentioned above a rescue who without batting an eye I spent thousands on vet care a short time after I received him. I live in the country on a good sized piece of property. I have no small children no cats etc. I have a good job and have plenty of expendable income to make sure that my dogs receive proper vet care.

I have been turned down by no less than 3 different organizations due to one or more of the following reasons:

I live too far away.... Yes that's right I was over 100 miles away from them so they would not adopt to me... Never mind the fact that the dog was picked up in LA and was being "fostered" in MI. I was completely willing to travel to MI, with my dog, to meet the dog and make sure they would be a good fit. That wasn't good enough however.

I didn't have a 6 foot fenced in yard..... Did I mention I live in the country? I do have a 1 acre fenced in area for my dog/dogs to go when I am not around. With a doggie door through the wall of the house no less so they can come and go as they need/please. But that fence is only 5 feet tall... not good enough for them...

I wouldn't take my dog through one of their "approved" training courses (which were not cheap mind you).
Look, I understand that someone who has no experience with shepherds should REALLY take a course with an experienced trainer... Believe me their intelligence can make them a handful to train. However I have a dog who I trained who has near instant recall even when starting off after a deer. Sits, stays, lays down, drops toys, gets in the house or the truck, and may other things... ON COMMAND. He is VERY well trained. I do not need help in that area.

I wouldn't agree to their "notification" requirements.
One organization required me to notify them of my dogs vet visits, vaccinations etc. and I needed to notify them if I was moving etc. Look that's just TOO much.

Pardon the long winded post but man dealing with many of these agencies has been a very trying experience....


EDIT:I do highly recommend the local pound/shelter for adoption.... Most of them are great and want the animals to find homes quickly where they will be safe and loved.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,067 Posts
And I thought it was just me.

I'm with you '56 Ford Guy!

I've taken in several dogs in my life who needed a new home for whatever reason. I love dogs. I enjoy miniature schnauzers the best. I wanted this one that was at a shelter, owner surrender. There was a $75 fee. Whatever. The shelter was about 2 1/2 hour drive away so I called first after I verified she still was on PetFinder. Nope-just adopted out. The next day, the same dog with the same picture was on PetFinder by a rescue group by now they need $425 for her due to all the vet checkups etc she 'had'.

Tried another schnauzer rescue for a 9 year old female. The fee was reasonable but they had like a four page application for me to fill out. I left most of it blank, especially the parts about if I worked full time, and if so how many hours away from my house I was per day etc. They called and asked for the information. No. If you want to talk to my vet fine. But I do not know who looks at these apps, and how secure is my private information is. If I tell you I'm gone 10 hours a day and no one is home, some pot smoking flunky boyfriend of one of your helpers can kick my door in and rob me knowing that a friendly familiar dog is the only thing on the other side of the door. No thanks. Especially since schnauzers usually die around 12 years old.

They called me back a day later and said I could have the dog minus the information I left off since they where overcrowded. No thanks. I hated to do that for the dogs sake but screw them. Breed specific rescues DO NOT HAVE THE ANIMALS BEST INTEREST IN MIND.

Whew-sorry for the rant.

isaac

PS-I have heard all the excuses in the world to why the want home visits etc. Again, my vet should be sufficient.

I've seen animal rescues from about every angle a person can. All our dogs have been rescues. Two horses we have now are rescues. We've owned two other rescue horses, fostered several, and sat on the boards for two different 501c3 large animal rescue groups. I've even brought an animal to a rescue, stray dog I found wandering down the road.

There are good people involved in animal rescue, but frankly they're overwhelmed. I may be jaded, but after our experience working with large animal groups I wouldn't have any type of involvement with a rescue if you paid me. The groups are usually people who are very emotional, but that overwhelms their ability to reason. A rescue has limited resources, so bringing animals in and housing them eternally fills up available land, eats feed and costs money. They have to come in and go out. Period. Frankly, a lot of large animals that come in are in no shape to go out. Horses in need of thousands of dollars worth of vet services, horrible temperaments from a life of abuse, etc. The most humane answer for a lot of these critters is to put them down. It's unfortunate, but true. A lot of rescue volunteers aren't ready to deal with that. They thought volunteering would mean brushing the pretty ponies and learning to clean hooves. That's ok, we can do the unpleasant part. You just need consent of the board to do it, and too many of them won't make the decision. They'd rather pour $3,000 into one animal and not help 10 others, than to put one down and let the ones that were in better shape move in, find homes and move out.

I could go on for hours. The first group we worked with genuinely disturbed me. They would outright lie to potential adopters about a horse, and most of the adopters had no idea what they were looking at so they couldn't evaluate the horse. They were trusting the nice rescue person, who was unfortunately trying to just unload a horse. The first horse we got from the rescue, I didn't like. The better half loved her, so you know how that turned out. After a week of having her she'd tried to attack us both. It was only then we found out she had bitten rescue volunteers and sent one to the hospital. We were both able to work with horses and be safe about it, but if that mare had gone to a different adopter (like the grandmother that wanted a pony for her granddaughter) someone could've been seriously injured or killed. We worked with that group for a year, and by a month in I was exhausted with them. They couldn't deal with an outside vendor, be it a vet, hay supplier, feed supplier, etc without expecting a discount. They'd beg for donations, then turn them down for not being good enough. I managed to stick it out six months before I was just done. The wife made it a year. After we parted ways, they hired a friend of mine to cut and bale a field for them for a certain amount per bale. When he was done, they claimed his bale count was 1/3 higher than it should've been and wouldn't pay. He hayed 800 acres and had monitors on all the equipment, so I tend to trust his count over 5-6 volunteers loading pickups with hay.

The second group we worked with was basically no different, and mirrored most of the comments here. On the rare occasions a good horse came into the rescue, the head volunteers would adopt it. Every potential adopter had to go through an intense screening process, farm inspection, and even then there were restrictions about what you could do with the animal, moving, etc. I could really go on for hours, but I won't. They get so wrapped up in trying to make sure the animals go to a good home, they forget that the animal does have to go at some point.

I've had German Shepherds since I was a kid. I had the father, and one of his pups that was about 4 years old. I had to move and couldn't take both, so I very reluctantly let the pup go to a family member. A couple years later my old Shepherd passed, and a few days later the owner of the pup called. They couldn't take care of him anymore and wanted to know what to do. I drove six hours the next day to pick him up and bring him home. Wasn't mad, just wish they had called sooner. Lot of vet visits, we got him all straightened out and I had him for several more years. I lost him a few years ago, and am looking for another Shepherd now. There's a German Shepherd rescue down in Colorado, but after dealing with almost two years worth of rescue trainwrecks and reading this one's website I'm inclined to just look elsewhere. I hate to be that way because the dogs do need homes, but I can't jump through a couple of months worth of hoops and spend damn near the same amount of money that I would for a purebred puppy with a known health history.

Anyway, yeah. I'll stop. :flag_of_truce:
 
1 - 20 of 45 Posts
Top