Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I've got bad news for you... Summer is in like 2 weeks. :laugh:

Nice looking blade... Do y'all get much snow where you are?
Not a lot, maybe 1/2 dozen 4-12" snowfalls every winter. I live in a subdivision with a lot of hilly asphalt roads. I will probably do a dozen or so driveways.

I wasn't going to buy until fall but dealer had one in stock and their price was about 400 cheaper than a couple other dealers I talked to about ordering one so I figured I better pull the trigger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,501 Posts
I would swap out the steel cutting edge for a rubber squeegee edge. Your asphalt driveway will appreciate it, plus the surface will be a lot cleaner, not to mention it won't bang around every time you lower it. The rubber plow edge also allows you to push snow onto the lawn and not damage it, which is very important. Plus the rubber won't catch pavement edges and damage things, the way the steel can.

Make sure the plow trip springs and the lock pins are not preventing the plow from tripping when it needs to. A very violent and damaging stop can occur if the plow can't properly trip when it encounters issues and it will.

If you mount the rubber edge the same way the steel plate is mounted, you can flip over the rubber edge as it wears. It doesn't need to be plow edge specifically and I would avoid any rubber material which has strands of material in it. Check with your local belt and hose supplier and pick up some bulk material there, tell them what you plan to do with it and they will suggest some. It should be at least 1/2" thick for strength...............up to 1" thick will work just fine.

Drill the holes larger than the bolt you are using as the rubber tends to shrink after you drill it. Use the steel edge as a template for drilling the rubber plow edge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I would swap out the steel cutting edge for a rubber squeegee edge. Your asphalt driveway will appreciate it, plus the surface will be a lot cleaner, not to mention it won't bang around every time you lower it. The rubber plow edge also allows you to push snow onto the lawn and not damage it, which is very important. Plus the rubber won't catch pavement edges and damage things, the way the steel can.

Make sure the plow trip springs and the lock pins are not preventing the plow from tripping when it needs to. A very violent and damaging stop can occur if the plow can't properly trip when it encounters issues and it will.

If you mount the rubber edge the same way the steel plate is mounted, you can flip over the rubber edge as it wears. It doesn't need to be plow edge specifically and I would avoid any rubber material which has strands of material in it. Check with your local belt and hose supplier and pick up some bulk material there, tell them what you plan to do with it and they will suggest some. It should be at least 1/2" thick for strength...............up to 1" thick will work just fine.

Drill the holes larger than the bolt you are using as the rubber tends to shrink after you drill it. Use the steel edge as a template for drilling the rubber plow edge.

Thank you for the great information. I will start looking for the material for the rubber cutting edge, sounds like a great idea!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
I love this blade. Paired mine with a 3 pt snowblower and am not disappointed.

Enjoy yours. Only issue I have with mine is it’s not level but I’m working on that.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,914 Posts
Here's my blade. I used a "horse stall mat" from tractor supply and cut strips from it. Works great, but you will have most of a stall mat left over! :) plus you will need a truck to haul the mat home. A google search should turn up some of the belting that Sully is talking about.

Zoom in on the pic to see how the rubber is above and below the steel cutting edge. That way I can flip it when it wearsout.

You can see in the second pic what a clean job it does.

You're going to be a popular person with your neighbors if you get a bunch of snow next year! :)


Sent by Tapatalk using the tiny keyboard on my phone. That explains the typos!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Here's my blade. I used a "horse stall mat" from tractor supply and cut strips from it. Works great, but you will have most of a stall mat left over! :) plus you will need a truck to haul the mat home. A google search should turn up some of the belting that Sully is talking about.

Zoom in on the pic to see how the rubber is above and below the steel cutting edge. That way I can flip it when it wearsout.

You can see in the second pic what a clean job it does.

You're going to be a popular person with your neighbors if you get a bunch of snow next year! :)


Sent by Tapatalk using the tiny keyboard on my phone. That explains the typos!
That is a great looking setup. Thanks for the pics, that helps a lot!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
452 Posts
Govt fleet mechanic chiming in here.
Where I work we are responsible for every airport, bridge and tunnel that connects NY and NJ. It was a few years ago that we swapped from steel edges to rubber/plastic blades. I can atest..... while the surface comes out cleaner, which is a huge plus for these, the fact is they create a LOT less wear and tear on the equipment.
You cant possibly go wrong using rubber/plastic or anything else thats NOT steel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,914 Posts
Thank you for the great information. I will start looking for the material for the rubber cutting edge, sounds like a great idea!
Happy to help! :good2: I figure that any guy that wears a "WV" hat in his avatar can't be too bad!! :laugh: (My folks are originally from Fairmont).

How "tall" is the black cutting edge on your blade? Basically, you're going to want a rubber piece that's about 2-3 inches wider. So if the cutting edge is 6", you're going to want a piece of rubber that's 8-9" wide so it sticks out 1-1.5" out from the edge. Enough to squeegie the snow, but not so much that it curls back and tears off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,352 Posts
Looks great. Off season is the best time to buy!

Govt fleet mechanic chiming in here.
Where I work we are responsible for every airport, bridge and tunnel that connects NY and NJ. It was a few years ago that we swapped from steel edges to rubber/plastic blades. I can atest..... while the surface comes out cleaner, which is a huge plus for these, the fact is they create a LOT less wear and tear on the equipment.
You cant possibly go wrong using rubber/plastic or anything else thats NOT steel.
How do edges that are "not steel" do with hardpack?
It seems I get a lot of calls to "fix" driveways where the owner was lazy and drove over the snow vs moving it, sometimes for multiple snowfalls and weeks.
The resulting ice pack is difficult to get off, but is seems the steel cutting edge on my rear blade works well to chip into it and break it up.

Keep in mind it's a rear blade, so no down pressure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Happy to help! :good2: I figure that any guy that wears a "WV" hat in his avatar can't be too bad!! :laugh: (My folks are originally from Fairmont).

How "tall" is the black cutting edge on your blade? Basically, you're going to want a rubber piece that's about 2-3 inches wider. So if the cutting edge is 6", you're going to want a piece of rubber that's 8-9" wide so it sticks out 1-1.5" out from the edge. Enough to squeegie the snow, but not so much that it curls back and tears off.


I will measure that this evening. Seemed like the stall mat might be the best option. I will throw the size out there and see if anyone has any suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
643 Posts
Rubber Wear Strip

Doesn't do to well on hard pack. Need the rigidity of steel to cut through it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
452 Posts
Looks great. Off season is the best time to buy!



How do edges that are "not steel" do with hardpack?
It seems I get a lot of calls to "fix" driveways where the owner was lazy and drove over the snow vs moving it, sometimes for multiple snowfalls and weeks.
The resulting ice pack is difficult to get off, but is seems the steel cutting edge on my rear blade works well to chip into it and break it up.

Keep in mind it's a rear blade, so no down pressure.
I totally get what you mean, as snow that sits becomes ice after a couple of days, especially when you drive on it.
Where I work, our responsibility is keeping the public roads open and safe. Thus, we dont really have any hard pack since they 'squeegee' it down to black top. I'd say 90-95% of our vehicles also get outfitted with salt spreaders. They start dropping salt as the first flake hits the ground and they dont stop until the snow stops.

Between our fleet, some have rubber blades, some teflon, some this new style yellow plastic. You will see all 3 of these blades at each of our facilities. Don't ask me which they send out for which application...... I only fix them. :laugh::laugh::laugh:

But what I can tell you is, we definitely dont get the type of frame and plow damage we used to get years ago since these non-steel blades have a lot of give. (although, we usually lose the feet on 50% of the trucks after every storm). No idea what they hit but, guess thats why they call it 'job security' :mocking:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,840 Posts
Even when I was in WI I found if I Kraft any hardpack as soon as the sun came out it’s was gone since everything else was black and sun warmed quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Has anyone in this forum added hydraulic tilt to the frontier blade yet? I've seen some diagrams but my John Deere dealer wasn't much help.

It shows it as an add-on option when ordering the blade from John Deere.

Thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,420 Posts
Has anyone in this forum added hydraulic tilt to the frontier blade yet? I've seen some diagrams but my John Deere dealer wasn't much help.

It shows it as an add-on option when ordering the blade from John Deere.

Thanks
The dealer wasn’t able to print any instructions? Did any instructions come with your kit?

It seems like it would be super simple. Two single acting cylinders, a few bolts and washers and two hoses.

Is there something specifically in the parts illustration that is causing concern?

By the way, you know you can buy the parts from JD for hundreds less than the kit price. Makes no sense but true.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,420 Posts
Is this the diagram you had seen? As you can see, it is actually only one bolt/nut for the hose guide and 4 pins, washers and cotter pins. Screw on the 90-degree fittings, attach hoses and you're ready to plow. :)

One question I have is.., are all AF10F blades able to have the angling kit added? I've seen folks posting photos of their blades on-line that appeared to not have the tabs for attaching the cylinders.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Is this the diagram you had seen? As you can see, it is actually only one bolt/nut for the hose guide and 4 pins, washers and cotter pins. Screw on the 90-degree fittings, attach hoses and you're ready to plow. :)

One question I have is.., are all AF10F blades able to have the angling kit added? I've seen folks posting photos of their blades on-line that appeared to not have the tabs for attaching the cylinders.


I will have to check that out when I get home today. You do not have a website or JD part number for that kit do you?
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top