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My wife and I recently bought an old farm house on 10 acres. We're "city folk" and as we're approaching out 40s, getting sick of city life.

There's about 2 acres in front that's mowable where all the structures are and I have a 52" zero turn for that (yeah - a little small, but any larger would end up scalping several sections). Then there's maybe 1 acre of wooded area that separates the front from the back, which is another 6-7 acres of land that was previously farmed.

My wife and I plan on doing some light farming/gardening for ourselves - likely will never exceed 1/4 acre and will start much smaller - like 400-500 sq/ft.

We also plan to put some fruit trees (apple, cherry, maybe pear) and Christmas trees in the back, plus some misc trees just for aesthetics/privacy. Our plan is to plant 10-12 Christmas trees per year, so in 5-10 years we'll have mature (enough) trees that we could supply trees for the family.

We have a horseshoe shaped asphalt driveway that's in need of some repairs.

I mention all this as a preface to my intended use cases and attachments. I'm thinking of getting the 1025R with the loader bucket (for moving dirt, firewood, salt, pellets, etc.) and backhoe with 16" bucket (for digging holes for the trees we intend to plant). In addition, I'm thinking about the following attachments:

Category 1 3-point hitch receiver drawbar with suitcase weight bracket (to be used for ballast when using the loader)
Single bottom plow (for turning over soil for new gardening areas)
48" tiller (clearly, for the garden)
6" trencher bucket for the backhoe (I have plans to redo the electrical situation since it's a little cobbled together and don't like the above-ground lines between all the structures)
disc hiller (for light tilling/hilling crops)
brush hog (for maintaining the unused portion of the back 6-7 acres which is currently 4-5 feet of wild grasses on the once farmed land)

Any advice, comments, or wisdom? I'm thinking of buying as many of the attachments as I can up front, hoping for a deal on multiple items.
 

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The up-front idea is wise. Not only can you get a deal, but if purchased on the same paper as the tractor:

1. the warranty on the equipment is extended

2.you can roll them into 0% financing (if taking advantage)

3. there are multi-attachment discounts

I would recommend looking at the 3rd scv as well. This would allow you to add a grapple, or a loader/mounted plow more easily in the future. It’s not a cheap option, but if there’s a chance either of this are in your future, take a hard look at it.
 

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Welcome to GTT.
Are you set on a 1025R? Seems a 2xxx series would be more suitable.
 

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You would probably need a lot of wheel weights, fluid in the tires, and weights on the front to pull a single plow with a 1025. I've actually never seen it done. If you need it you probably need a 2 series.
The farm land that you want to cut will probably ride terrible with the small tires as well unless you want to run about 2 mph the whole time.
 

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If it were me, I'd skip the single bottom plow. IMO, you're better off planting a deep root cover crop (like radishes) and then running the rototiller directly. The single bottom plow is really only useful the first time you break ground. After that, it'll sit. So my recommendation would be to spend your money elsewhere.

See if your dealer will let you "test drive" some different models on your property. You aren't talking about using the tractor for mowing which is where the smaller machines shine. A larger 2- or 3- series machine would have a lot of advantages for your situation. I particular, I'd suggest you look closely at a 3025E. You can get the loader and backhoe plus you can get R1 tires. It'll be a lot more capable for the sort of tasks you are talking about.
 

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Like Jim, I would skip the plow.

Also I would not consider getting a hoe for a probably one time "trenching" job. I did a lot of trenching for mostly electrical when I established the place on 6 acres. In my opinion you cannot beat one of those trenchers that you ride on, I tried the walk behind but switched to the rider, unbelievable perfect trenches.. Rent it, use the hey out of it for the 24 hour rental, and turn it back in. ;)
 

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Welcome from central Indiana!

Cutting 5+ acres or so of rough ground with a 1025 and a 4’ cutter will be miserable. Small tires and rough ground is not a good combination. You’ll need to cut at least twice a year to keep weeds and brush manageable. You might want to see if someone would hay that acreage for you and you don’t need to worry about keeping it cut and in good condition.

What is your location? That will help us give you more region specific guidance.
 

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A few things:
  • I'd stick with default 12" bucket, it'll do the trees and the trench just fine, and will a save storing a bucket.
  • The BH is great ballast, it's all I use currently when doing loader work, however if space is a concern, it isn't as compact as a weight bar on the 3pt. Those weight bars with enough weight arn't cheap!
  • I'll second the comments about getting the third SCV for the loader at time of purchase, it'll be cheaper to get installed and based on your use cases, sounds like a grapple might come in handy.
  • Pallet forks: So much more than moving pallets. I've got the cheaper titan 36" forks and in addition to moving pallets around I use them for maintaining equipment (generator, pressure washer, etc.) digging, moving down trees, receiving freight (under 600lbs) avoiding additional liftgate fees, and once you've got them, you'll also start to palletize things and store them. Sure, who needs a forklift... then you get something similar and wonder how you managed without.
  • I can't speak to plows/tillers, haven't had a need/don't use them...
  • Tractor size: Like opinions everyone has one. I've got a 1025R and it doesn't leave me needing a bigger tractor (2025R) for my use. I'd love to have a 4066r specifically for the loader, to move 1ton pallets of pellets around. Other than my unrealistic desire to spend 40k on a tractor to move twice yearly a ton of pellets around, it's been fantastic.
If you're taking advantage of the 0% financing, I'd personally get all the items your going to use initially in with the tractor (and the 3rd function). For the nice to have items, don't need right away, I'm a Craigslist shopper.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Lots of good feedback already!

I'm in mid-Michigan, Fowlerville area to be more precise.

I've definitely been considering the 3rd SCV, but I don't have a ton of trees on my property and I'm not sure what else I'd use the 3rd for on a semi-regular basis.

Basically, I'm looking at the 1025R primarily because of the size. My barn isn't huge, and the 2-series and especially the 3-series have a bigger footprint. I've actually been thinking of the 2038R because I thought the extra power might be really beneficial for things like tilling.

In regard to plowing... I've watched a few videos where it seems doable... definitely see some struggles in tough ground, but I've not yet seen one where it completely fails to get the job done. Since this is not going to be related to my livelihood (I'm not farming as a business) and I'm doing it on such a small scale, I'm thinking if it takes me even an extra day to turn over fresh ground, that may not really be a big deal.

Test driving on my property is an interesting idea - had no idea that could be an option! I'll definitely look into this no matter which way I end up going.

I don't intend to mow the back 6-7 on a regular basis... basically I'll let the wild grasses grow and just hack it down once a year or every other year to keep it from going too wild. I also plan to have a few "trails" back there for ATVs and as well as a 30' shooting range with a backstop. This is another reason I was thinking of something larger than the 1025R - building hills for the trails and backstop for the range. But once it's done, it's done and just requires a little maintenance... so a little extra work and time with the 1025R might be worth not having a bigger investment in a larger tractor. Maybe? I don't know...

I definitely have thought about pallet forks... if nothing else, it might be easier to move all these attachments around on small pallets or just with forks & straps. At first I was thinking, the 1025R doesn't have much chance lifting a full 2-ton pallet of wood pellets, but maybe it won't be a big deal for me to just unload the pallet into the loader bucket 4-5 times to empty the pallet. My goal is not necessarily to rid myself of all physical labor. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Another thought on the 1025R vs. larger tractors... I want to be able to drive this anywhere on my property without too much concern. The septic tanks are old, the fields are old... eventually if I have to service them I want the tractor to be capable of doing so, but with the 1025R starting at 1500 lbs before ballast and attachments, and the 2038R starting at about 2500 lbs... I'd worry every time I drive the 2038R over the septic systems... I'd still try to avoid it with the 1025R, but I wouldn't be quite as concerned.
 

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Seems a 2xxx series would be more suitable.
Much more suitable!(y)(y)(y)

You'll be looking to trade to at least a 2025R in less than a year.
 

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Much more suitable!(y)(y)(y)

You'll be looking to trade to at least a 2025R in less than a year.
Can you comment as to why? I'm not saying you're wrong... just wondering specifically what you anticipate a 2-series would do better for me than a 1-series, especially with the same engine.
 

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I've definitely been considering the 3rd SCV, but I don't have a ton of trees on my property and I'm not sure what else I'd use the 3rd for on a semi-regular basis.
The nice thing about a 3rd function is that once you have it you can just add hoses and use it either front or back. Some people love their hydraulic toplink. Other's use it for all sorts of things (log splitters, snow blower chute control, grapple control, etc..). Pretty much no one ever complains about having hydraulic ports that they don't need.

Basically, I'm looking at the 1025R primarily because of the size. My barn isn't huge, and the 2-series and especially the 3-series have a bigger footprint. I've actually been thinking of the 2038R because I thought the extra power might be really beneficial for things like tilling.
Storage concerns are always valid. Measure your barn and look at the actual differences in sizes though. The jump from a 1025R to a 3025E isn't 6 ft. The wheelbase on a 1025R is 57". The 3025E is 63" and the 2032R/2038R is 68". We're talking a foot or two here in length and a few inches in width.

In regard to plowing... I've watched a few videos where it seems doable... definitely see some struggles in tough ground, but I've not yet seen one where it completely fails to get the job done. Since this is not going to be related to my livelihood (I'm not farming as a business) and I'm doing it on such a small scale, I'm thinking if it takes me even an extra day to turn over fresh ground, that may not really be a big deal.
Using a plow is def doable. I don't think that's in question. But how often are you actually going to do it? It seems most gardeners have gone to low-till or no-till gardening. Once you've turned over your plot the first time, will you ever use it again? A decent PTO tiller will dig down 6" easily and some will go down 8"-9". How deep do you really need to go? Most people just don't bother with them any more. If you REALLY want a plow for some reason, they are sold dirt cheap on Craigslist all the time.
 

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Another thought on the 1025R vs. larger tractors... I want to be able to drive this anywhere on my property without too much concern. The septic tanks are old, the fields are old... eventually if I have to service them I want the tractor to be capable of doing so, but with the 1025R starting at 1500 lbs before ballast and attachments, and the 2038R starting at about 2500 lbs... I'd worry every time I drive the 2038R over the septic systems... I'd still try to avoid it with the 1025R, but I wouldn't be quite as concerned.

Again, a valid concern. The leach fields won't matter but the tank probably should be - especially an older tank. My septic tank is roughly 10'x 8' and it's easy enough to never drive over it.

On the other hand, with a 2- or 3- series you get a full Cat 1 3pt hitch instead of the limited Cat 1, increased 3pt weight capacity, increased loader capacity, increase ground clearance, the ability to use larger implements (tiller, bush hog, etc..), higher hydraulic system flow rates and the option of getting R1 tires (which look to me to be the best tires suited to your uses...).

Essentially, either the 2 or 3-series will do everything the 1-series will do better. The trade off is an increase in size and weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Again, a valid concern. The leach fields won't matter but the tank probably should be - especially an older tank. My septic tank is roughly 10'x 8' and it's easy enough to never drive over it.

On the other hand, with a 2- or 3- series you get a full Cat 1 3pt hitch instead of the limited Cat 1, increased 3pt weight capacity, increased loader capacity, increase ground clearance, the ability to use larger implements (tiller, bush hog, etc..), higher hydraulic system flow rates and the option of getting R1 tires (which look to me to be the best tires suited to your uses...).

Essentially, either the 2 or 3-series will do everything the 1-series will do better. The trade off is an increase in size and weight.
I can see the advantage of a 2 or 3 series in regard to wheel size compared to the terrain out there. But since I'm not going to be farming the whole area, it's a once or twice a year thing that it would be an issue, and as long as I'm not damaging the tractor or implements, I can deal with being tossed around a bit and not having really clean cuts. And if it really becomes an issue, there are adjacent farmers with much larger equipment... I'm sure if I tossed them a few hundred bucks they'd plow it, disc it, till it... whatever they'd need to do to smooth it out for me. They've already approached us about leasing the land, and we're thinking we're going to turn that down and start utilizing it ourselves. But we seriously considered letting them lease it for another year and let them turn over the land with their big equipment so we have more or less a "fresh" start next year.

I'd have a hard time buying the 2025R just for the larger frame... seems like half the complaints about the 1025R are in relation to power and the rest are the size... so I can't see putting an engine which is underpowered for some tasks in a small frame into a larger frame. And since there's only a couple grand difference between the 2032R and 2038R, I can't see going with anything other than the 2038R in regard to the 2-series. But that's roughly $10k more than the 1025R... not insignificant.

And at that point, why not spend a couple grand more and get a 3039R with the 1 ton bucket capacity. And then with ballast in the tires and an attachment or two, it's going to be about 2.5 tons... which is getting closer and closer to the capacity of a tandem axle trailer with 3500 lbs axles...

So again I come back to... do I want to spend $50k on a tractor with implements that'll be closing in on the practical limits of common trailers and tow vehicles and may prompt me to upgrade my trailer and tow vehicle... all for a <1/4 acre garden and some random work around the property? Or does it make more sense to stick with something small, that I could even throw onto a single axle 6x12 aluminum trailer to take down the road to my in-laws with our Jeep Wrangler or pretty much any mid-size SUV? This is the logic that keeps bringing me back to the 1025R.
 

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There are a lot of folks here that started with a 1025R and eventually upsized to a bigger tractor after they did all the same research as you and never thought they would need a bigger machine. So, there is something to be said for the collective experiences here. You can read the specs and decide if those differences are enough to sway you one way or another (it seems like you already have).

You are about the same age as me, so maybe ride quality isn't real high on your list either. BUT, that is something that you cannot understand until you place your butt in the machines seat and drive it. The small tires and elevated seating position (compared to a lawn mower) really do make the 1 series machines a rough ride. If you aren't going to be on one all day, it probably doesn't matter.

I'm on and off mine all day sometimes, it doesn't bother me yet. I'm on month 8 of ownership with zero remorse for what I bought. In fact, its quite the opposite at this point since I've already accomplished bigger tasks than I think this machine should be capable of. I do use mine as a mower, so during warmer months I'm on it for about 2 hours every week mowing 2 acres. You learn the terrain very quickly in your yard and how to drive the machine accordingly in each area.

The machines hold their value very well, so the "risk" buying a smaller machine is minimized somewhat. To be clear, you will loose money if you decide 6-12 months later to upsize but its less than some other brands. Go with your gut and I'm sure you'll be happy, don't overthink it.
 

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I can see the advantage of a 2 or 3 series in regard to wheel size compared to the terrain out there. But since I'm not going to be farming the whole area, it's a once or twice a year thing that it would be an issue, and as long as I'm not damaging the tractor or implements, I can deal with being tossed around a bit and not having really clean cuts.
Personally, I don't concern myself with getting bounced around. I'd be more concerned with getting tires in the pattern that matches the tasks I'd be accomplishing than the tire size.

The majority of tasks you're talking about are typical agricultural tasks - tilling, field mowing, etc.. There is a reason farmers typically use R1 tires for those sorts of tasks.
 
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Discussion Starter #18
There are a lot of folks here that started with a 1025R and eventually upsized to a bigger tractor after they did all the same research as you and never thought they would need a bigger machine. So, there is something to be said for the collective experiences here. You can read the specs and decide if those differences are enough to sway you one way or another (it seems like you already have).

You are about the same age as me, so maybe ride quality isn't real high on your list either. BUT, that is something that you cannot understand until you place your butt in the machines seat and drive it. The small tires and elevated seating position (compared to a lawn mower) really do make the 1 series machines a rough ride. If you aren't going to be on one all day, it probably doesn't matter.

I'm on and off mine all day sometimes, it doesn't bother me yet. I'm on month 8 of ownership with zero remorse for what I bought. In fact, its quite the opposite at this point since I've already accomplished bigger tasks than I think this machine should be capable of. I do use mine as a mower, so during warmer months I'm on it for about 2 hours every week mowing 2 acres. You learn the terrain very quickly in your yard and how to drive the machine accordingly in each area.

The machines hold their value very well, so the "risk" buying a smaller machine is minimized somewhat. To be clear, you will loose money if you decide 6-12 months later to upsize but its less than some other brands. Go with your gut and I'm sure you'll be happy, don't overthink it.
Awesome feedback, thanks. That's exactly why I'm here - the information you can't get from spec sheets or the 3 or 4 YouTube channels that do a lot of 1025R videos. :)

I'm thinking before I actually write the check, I'm going to do a little walking and maybe even get the Jeep out in the back acreage and see just how rough it is and see whether I feel like I'd be able to keep it tamed with a brush hog.

Other than that, I think the biggest job I'd end up with is earth moving to create paths (for which a tiller might even be enough to turn over the top few inches and then maybe even cover with stone/gravel) and a backstop for shooting that I want... and I have a friend down the road with a compact, basically equivalent to the 2025R, that I'm sure would come over to help get the job done more quickly even if it's not all that much more capable.

Also, I'm not afraid of modern diesel emissions systems - I drove a 2018 Duramax Colorado for a few years until I got a company vehicle and loved it. Almost wish I had kept it, but couldn't justify the cost as a 3rd vehicle. However, the fact that the 1025R doesn't have a DPF or any other emissions devices (does it even have EGR? I can't find a part number for an EGR valve for the 1025R...) is attractive because it means less to go wrong. I know there are ways to deal with that... but this way I don't have to and there's no question as to whether the warranty is in-tact or not.
 

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I've less acreage but have the same dilemma as you. I've settled on and ordered a 1025 TLB. I could certainly "make do" with a 2025 but for me I have two septic beds of which weight matters and some steep property that I want a lower tractor thus I will keep the x738 for grass and the 1025r for maintenance.

The 2025 has some advantages over the one with the increased tire size, ground clearance and top speed... the bigger twos have a larger footprint and larger price which put them out of my scope of needs.

In case you may not have seen, I did some rudimentary compares of the models:

Line itemx7381025r2025r
Base tractor weight
953​
1444​
1709​
120R Loader
626​
626​
120R Bucket
183​
183​
Tractor//loader
2253​
2518​
260B Backhoe
610​
610​
TLB weight
2863​
3128​
54" MMM219 lb197 lb197 lb
Length base tractor79.2 in108 in111 in
Width48.0 in47.2 in48 in
Height seat or hood52.9 in41.5 in48 in
Height ROPS up90 in94 in
Height ROPS down73 in74 in
Width48 in 47 in48 in
Wheelbase55.7 in. 57.1 in63 in.
PTO HP17.2 hp17.2 hp
PTO Pump6.5 gpm7 gpm
Fuel capacity5.2 gal6.3 gal5.39 gal.
Front axle1349 lb1349 lb
Rear axle1576 lb2425 lb
3-Point lift capy758 lb882 lb
3 Point Lift end1177 lb1234 lb
Front axle clear9.0 in12.5 in
Turning Radius25 in 7.4 ft8.7 ft
Max drawbar load2165 lb
Low speed4.1 mph5.6 mph
High speed8.5 mph9.1 mph12.3 mph
FR tire18x8.50-1018x8.5-1023x8.50-12
RR tire26x12-1226x12-1231x12-16.5
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Personally, I don't concern myself with getting bounced around. I'd be more concerned with getting tires in the pattern that matches the tasks I'd be accomplishing than the tire size.

The majority of tasks you're talking about are typical agricultural tasks - tilling, field mowing, etc.. There is a reason farmers typically use R1 tires for those sorts of tasks.
Are there aftermarket R1 tire options?
 
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