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Are there aftermarket R1 tire options?
There are. That said, IMO, they aren't "good" options. I don't want to bog down the discussion here but the issue for me is that with the 1-series you have (rear) wheels that are 9.5" wide and designed for use with a 12" wide tire. While you can by R1s in the same 26x12x12 size as the R3s, they're sort or a "high flotation R1". They're great for tractor pulling in a groomed arena but in field use you usually want a narrower R1 tire so that it cuts through mud and gets to solid ground underneath instead of floating on top of the mud.

There may be after market wheels better suited for a narrower tire that will fit the 1-series machines. I'm not sure. To be honest, it isn't something that comes up a lot on here. Most 1-series discussions tend to be more focused on lawns and/or snow removal where you're talking about actual field work as your primary use.
 
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'20 1025R, 120R, 54D
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On the 1025R I personally don't think the VersaTurf's can be beat.
 

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For what it is worth, I echo the concerns of others with using the 1025 in anything other than a lawn & driveway scenario. I have one, and have attempted to use it in places other than a groomed lawn or graded driveway, and it is very easy to get stuck in a rut and "bury the axle" --especially in former farmland. The 1025 does not have the ground clearance nor the tire size to handle anything even remotely resembling field work. You also do not have independent right/left brakes, which are very helpful for getting unstuck. You'll need something with a much larger diameter tire. I know this is a "green tractor enthusiast" website, but the 1025R is basically a glorified riding lawnmower. It is not robust enough for heavy duty chores. I am biased: Mine has failed spectacularly when I needed it, including during these recent snowstorms (see my recent posts and you'll see what I am going through). Having had it apart & back together, I can say there are many things that are engineered "light duty."

I don't know where you stand with finances, but while a loader is a good thing to have, unless you plan to use the backhoe a lot, I would not get one. It will be cheaper to rent one (or a mini-excavator...$250 /weekend in my area) and they do take up a lot of barn space, which you mentioned you don't have a lot of. Leaving it outside exposed to the elements is probably not the best way to treat such an investment.

No down-pressure for the 3-point could make plowing tough. Lack of ground contact/adhesion due to low weight & lack of ag tires will make it almost impossible in anything other than a demonstration format, especially if it is wet. I cannot see dropping the right wheels of a 1025 into the previously plowed furrow as is the norm when working with a single-bottom plow. Those who suggest having a tiller only for working up a garden are on the right track.

In short, I would suggest something with at least a rear tire that comes up at least hip high. 4WD, with front end loader. Good luck, Dave
 

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Man so much of what you said I just went through...

  • My wife and I recently bought an old farm house on 10 acres. We're "city folk" and as we're approaching out 40s, getting sick of city life. - Check
  • There's about 2 acres in front that's mowable - Check
  • My wife and I plan on doing some light farming/gardening for ourselves - Check
  • Single bottom plow (for turning over soil for new gardening areas) - Check (Tried it once... haven't used it since)
  • 48" tiller (clearly, for the garden) - Check - And more... anything you want to smooth out or dig out (think swales, loosen up dirt to make mounds for a gun range, etc. I use it all the time.
  • 6" trencher bucket for the backhoe (I have plans to redo the electrical situation since it's a little cobbled together and don't like the above-ground lines between all the structures) - Actually thinking of upgrading to a new 1025r with backhoe... Yes, I can rent one but in 3 years I haven't. I've dug by hand, or used the FEL when a back hoe would have been great!!
  • disc hiller (for light tilling/hilling crops) - Check - nice to have but a bit limited due to the height of the tractor... same with most gardening activities once the plants get tall.
  • brush hog (for maintaining the unused portion of the back 6-7 acres which is currently 4-5 feet of wild grasses on the once farmed land) - Check - Twice a year I've mowed the back 7ish acres.. Yes, it takes time and yes it's bumpier than a more purpose built tractor but it gets the job done.... surprisingly well.

I tell my wife every day how much I love the 1025r. Best purchase we made when we moved out to the country. Fits in our small barn. Does all kinds of stuff I never thought of... I love the thing.
 

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Many, if not most of us, really like our 1025r's. There are some who bought a 1023e or 1025r and then moved up. In fact, some have moved up more than once to larger machines. There are GTT a couple of members who have had 4 machines in 3 years. Others continue to use their same machine and it meets their needs. Why do different people do different things? It's all based upon their goals and needs and their machine user experience.

Basically, you need to try a couple of different machines. You need to determine what implements you MUST have and which you can add later. Is driving over a drain field or septic tank with a 1 series going to be fine but a 2 series is going to cause the field to collapse? Who could possibly know. Chances are none of the machines are going to cause a problem. But it wise to at least consider it. If you really needed a 2 series machine but was worried about the weight on the septic system, just avoid driving over the impacted areas. That's an easy solution as well.

The time has come FOR YOU to get on machines and try them. Otherwise, you are going to get caught in this virtual world of "What if's" and not make any forward progress. Honestly, when you get on the machines, you are going to find some which really feel right and others which don't for some reason.

If your other half is going to use the machine, make sure they also demo the machines with you. Even if they aren't going to be involved in the use of the machine, having their input makes the entire thing more palatable to them. After all, you are spending a decent amount of money which takes some time and effort to earn. It's just respectful to have your spouse or other half involved. Plus it helps them understand the economic value of the machine for your property.

Go drive some machines and speak with the dealer. See if they have some demo machines where they might be able to drop one off for you to try for a day or two. At a minimum, drive they around the dealer property and I don't mean the parking lot, unless you plan on keeping your machine on pavement.

I would guess that 90% of those buying their machines are happy with their purchases. Maybe 5% to 7% wish they had gotten a larger machine, and occasionally there is someone who trades down, but its not real common. Then there are a small percentage who just aren't happy for some reason. It's interesting because often the things they complain about are very obvious before they purchase, yet they buy the machine anyway and then complain about the issues as being unsatisfactory. I guess people will be people.

You are at the point where you have had enough "Online chats" and its time to meet the tractor in person on a date. That's when you really get to know one another. All of the other stuff if quite superficial until you climb in the seat and take it for a ride. You will draw some quick conclusions from operating the machines and it will help you make up your mind. Once you settle on the tractor, the implement decisions will be easier. Plus you will know how much of a budget you have to work with.

Then you will have a definite idea of which direction you are going. Looking forward to hearing your thoughts you meet in person..........
 

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This is very interesting to me, that the x7xx's 54" MMM is 22 lb heavier.
Have never been able to figure that one out... how a 54HC on a 7xx can be heaver than a 7 iron 54 for the 1 series. That's what Mother Deere says though...
 
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For what it is worth, I echo the concerns of others with using the 1025 in anything other than a lawn & driveway scenario. I have one, and have attempted to use it in places other than a groomed lawn or graded driveway, and it is very easy to get stuck in a rut and "bury the axle" --especially in former farmland. The 1025 does not have the ground clearance nor the tire size to handle anything even remotely resembling field work. You also do not have independent right/left brakes, which are very helpful for getting unstuck. You'll need something with a much larger diameter tire. I know this is a "green tractor enthusiast" website, but the 1025R is basically a glorified riding lawnmower. It is not robust enough for heavy duty chores. I am biased: Mine has failed spectacularly when I needed it, including during these recent snowstorms (see my recent posts and you'll see what I am going through). Having had it apart & back together, I can say there are many things that are engineered "light duty."

I don't know where you stand with finances, but while a loader is a good thing to have, unless you plan to use the backhoe a lot, I would not get one. It will be cheaper to rent one (or a mini-excavator...$250 /weekend in my area) and they do take up a lot of barn space, which you mentioned you don't have a lot of. Leaving it outside exposed to the elements is probably not the best way to treat such an investment.

No down-pressure for the 3-point could make plowing tough. Lack of ground contact/adhesion due to low weight & lack of ag tires will make it almost impossible in anything other than a demonstration format, especially if it is wet. I cannot see dropping the right wheels of a 1025 into the previously plowed furrow as is the norm when working with a single-bottom plow. Those who suggest having a tiller only for working up a garden are on the right track.

In short, I would suggest something with at least a rear tire that comes up at least hip high. 4WD, with front end loader. Good luck, Dave

I'm going to disagree with you here. I have the same problem with my front-PTO shaft, but I don't think this is a tractor problem, this is the attachments engineering department who did a crappy job adding-on to the tractor.

I've been wondering if the right thing to do is dump the JD blower and go with a Radtech. It's a completely different front hitch. You can get them in the US if you email Radtech who will point you to their US distributor who can get you hooked up with a US dealer.... it's just a rotten pain in the neck. I don't have pricing yet because I stopped pursuing it, but I plan on some thinking on this topic this spring and summer.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
You are at the point where you have had enough "Online chats" and its time to meet the tractor in person on a date.
That sounds like some excellent advice. I do tend to suffer from analysis paralysis. My wife and I are planning to visit a dealer this weekend and see what they have. I'm assuming stock is pretty low right now based on what I've heard, but we'll see.

A demo unit they'd leave with me overnight would be awesome.
 

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That sounds like some excellent advice. I do tend to suffer from analysis paralysis. My wife and I are planning to visit a dealer this weekend and see what they have. I'm assuming stock is pretty low right now based on what I've heard, but we'll see.

A demo unit they'd leave with me overnight would be awesome.
JD dealers seem to be much like Harley dealers. They want you to test drive their equipment and in my neck of the woods they are low pressure.

You might find a dealer that has all of the tractors you want in stock and test ride them all there. I've done that a number of times and as the one dealer said "we find most folks come back more than once since it's a sizable purchase for most everyone, including a farmer".

I know it's sacrilege but I've A/B'ed a 1025 and 2025 a bunch of times and find myself coming back to the 1025r. The two series is an awesome machine but the one seems compact and that's just what I need.

Be sure and make sure you do extended test rides though. The machines handle and ride different and a short parking lot ride on a 1025 isn't gonna give you the feel of a 2025 with the engine at max RPMs and running in high range.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Green mark equipment in high seems to have a decent stock
Don't seem to have a Green Mark Equipment very close to me... I don't mind driving, but where are you referring to? I think "in high" seems like a type-o. Closest one I can find is in Jonesville, MI.
 

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I think "in high" is referring to high gear on a 1025R and a 2025R.
 

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I'm going to disagree with you here. I have the same problem with my front-PTO shaft, but I don't think this is a tractor problem, this is the attachments engineering department who did a crappy job adding-on to the tractor.

I've been wondering if the right thing to do is dump the JD blower and go with a Radtech. It's a completely different front hitch. You can get them in the US if you email Radtech who will point you to their US distributor who can get you hooked up with a US dealer.... it's just a rotten pain in the neck. I don't have pricing yet because I stopped pursuing it, but I plan on some thinking on this topic this spring and summer.
Scooterman: Thanks, but I do look at it differently. The tractor/mower/snowblower is designed as a "system." The mid-mount PTO shaft should be able to interact with the rest of the system seamlessly. Part of this is the flaws in the tractor design itself.

If you follow my discussion here: (Mid PTO bearing replacement) you'll see the inside of the front cover of the transmission. Part of the problem here is that the mid-mount PTO seal is "recessed" from the surface of the cover (look at the picture where the seal is being installed). This recess is unnecessary and has the unfortunate effect of making the support bearings for the mid-mount PTO shaft very closely spaced: in essence, one ball bearing is on one side of the driving gear, and the other is on the other. Maybe 1/2 inch separation between them. Hence the "support reaction" that occurs if there is any vertical force applied to the PTO shaft will be enormous. This is very poor design (bearing separation & support reaction is a fundamental design skill taught in any undergraduate mechanical engineering machine design course), and is very much part of the tractor.

But even if that is set aside, I as an owner of a pretty expensive piece of equipment should not have to have even done any of this. It should be reliable, and I should be able to fix it when it breaks. If I am using attachments that were designed by the same manufacturer for the tractor, then they should fit and work well together...as a "system."

I have 407 hours on the tractor. I have just had to do a major transmission repair. Every year I have owned the tractor, I have had to repair something with several weeks of down-time. The inability of the three closest dealers to find and supply the right parts makes me glad I do the work myself instead of paying them. The support I have received from the manufacturer (who no longer makes the proper front PTO shaft!) has been disappointing at best. Just as with the attachments, I include the dealer service & part support from the manufacturer as part of the "system."

My honest experience over the past three years, and this winter in particular, has given me many reasons to recommend against this tractor.

I am glad to read your experience has been different. I would not wish my experience on anyone. But I cannot agree that this is a "good tractor." A "good tractor" can do more than mow the lawn, which is about all this one does for me (when it's working).

Sorry for the rant, but I think we will all benefit if Deere knows their products, service, and parts support do not have the reputation they seem to think they do.

Dave
 

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We bought a 130+ year old farm house that needed renovation. The 2.6 acres also needed renovation.
I went to Deere to look at small tractors because size and turning radius were important because I also planned to use it in the barn.
We looked at the the 1023 and when my wife heard there was a difference in HP, she reminded me that all things being equal I prefer more horsepower. Then we looked at the 1025r and the tilt wheel was more comfortable for me. Then she sees the 1025 TLB and asks if "the digger would be good for planting her trees?". Salesman offers to bring it to our house to let us try it for a few days. We said no, we're good and bought the TLB. After 5 years we still don't regret it.
We like having the backhoe available anytime we want it without having to plan a rental (and then racing the clock).
We have used the FEL to back fill the foundation on the new addition. move dirt, gravel, sand, mulch, snow, and also logs, pallets and also loading and unloading freight, brick, stone, etc. with the forks. I even use a fork on pallets as a mobile work bench for the miter saw or tile and brick saw.
We tilled a quarter acre garden/orchard area and also an acre for new lawn (and for the neighbors as well)
We drilled holes for fence posts.
We use the hoe for trenching, stump removal, planting trees and burying pets.
I eventually bought a MMM for the new lawn.
We consider our 1025r TLB to be a huge blessing as it has allowed us to do projects that our aging bodies would not appreciate if we had to do them manually.

So put your butt in the seat of a 1 and a 2 and try them out to see which one will make your lives more enjoyable.
 

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Everyone's wants and needs are different but as a 1025R owner I can say the biggest irritant for me is the lower clearance due to smaller wheels. The limited Cat 1 hitch is just that. Limited. There are certain implements you just can't raise properly and there is no workaround. And being closer to the ground, you'll snag a lot more brush/trash if you ever find yourself mowing a tall meadow, chopping corn stover, etc. Other than that, it's probably suitable for your needs. It seems a lot of posters are happy with theirs.
 

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Sounds like
I can see the advantage of a 2 or 3 series in regard to wheel size compared to the terrain out there. But since I'm not going to be farming the whole area, it's a once or twice a year thing that it would be an issue, and as long as I'm not damaging the tractor or implements, I can deal with being tossed around a bit and not having really clean cuts. And if it really becomes an issue, there are adjacent farmers with much larger equipment... I'm sure if I tossed them a few hundred bucks they'd plow it, disc it, till it... whatever they'd need to do to smooth it out for me. They've already approached us about leasing the land, and we're thinking we're going to turn that down and start utilizing it ourselves. But we seriously considered letting them lease it for another year and let them turn over the land with their big equipment so we have more or less a "fresh" start next year.

I'd have a hard time buying the 2025R just for the larger frame... seems like half the complaints about the 1025R are in relation to power and the rest are the size... so I can't see putting an engine which is underpowered for some tasks in a small frame into a larger frame. And since there's only a couple grand difference between the 2032R and 2038R, I can't see going with anything other than the 2038R in regard to the 2-series. But that's roughly $10k more than the 1025R... not insignificant.

And at that point, why not spend a couple grand more and get a 3039R with the 1 ton bucket capacity. And then with ballast in the tires and an attachment or two, it's going to be about 2.5 tons... which is getting closer and closer to the capacity of a tandem axle trailer with 3500 lbs axles...

So again I come back to... do I want to spend $50k on a tractor with implements that'll be closing in on the practical limits of common trailers and tow vehicles and may prompt me to upgrade my trailer and tow vehicle... all for a <1/4 acre garden and some random work around the property? Or does it make more sense to stick with something small, that I could even throw onto a single axle 6x12 aluminum trailer to take down the road to my in-laws with our Jeep Wrangler or pretty much any mid-size SUV? This is the logic that keeps bringing me back to the 1025R.
Seems like you’ve already made up your mind and are looking for validation.
 
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