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Discussion Starter #41
Not sure, worth is up too you, are they that much better of a tiller, maybe because of the ability to offset. But I could go to my dealer right now and bring home a 57" Frontier for a little under $2400 or a 49" Frontier for 2K, but I do realize that pricing varies widely by region. I will say though that I didn't know Frontier had reverse rotation tillers, perhaps they are made to switch either way like the County Line.
Online it lists separate model number for forward or reversible. I don’t think they are reversible like the county lines
 

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Discussion Starter #43
Behlen is on the left, tarter on the right. Looks like the gear box is different. Can't tell any other difference from these pictures. I talked to TSC and they said they just order a County Line tiller and whatever comes is what they get. They can't specify.
 

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Not sure about the whole made in China thing, but I'll tell from my own experience. I DO NOT think you'll be one bit disappointed with the County Line tiller, they are heavy, well built and work very well.
 

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Looks like both are built to the same specifics. They look identical. I doubt you could wear out either one. And yes all gear boxes are made in China. As long as your tractor supply will continue to carry parts for it. Go for it.


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I’m sure they are a tarter dealer. If you really wanted the made in USA. Ask them how much a 4 ft tarter branded tiller is. Can’t be much difference. Or order one from tarter.


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Use a tiller from Tractor supply in clay soil. Deepest setting for a couple passes, then let it set for a week. About 3 final passes with depth just enough to cover up tire tracks. Not fine enough for a Good Housekeeping cover photo but works.
 

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I just got a king kutter 60” and it works great. The ground that I am tilling has not been touched in at least 20 years. It is a forward rotation tiller and I paid $1549.00 at Farm and Fleet.
 

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I do a combination of subsoiler, tiller, and plow. I subsoil in a checkerboard pattern in the spring, immediately followed by tilling. In the fall, I subsoil again and turn over all the dying vegetation with the plow. I have anywhere from 8 to 15 inches of good soil before I hit the clay layer. I am trying to create a deeper loam layer on top. Seems to be working.
 

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Clay is hard task master. I would go to a farmer in your area and ask how you should proceed. Up north where I’m from they plow in the fall so the clods can freeze over winter and then in the spring they just fall apart when they hit it with a finishing tool. I doubt that you have the freeze thing going for you, so go to a farmer that raises good crops and learn what you can. It would be better to put it off for a year than to start and create problems down the road. He would have some advice on what to get, I’m sure.
 

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I just got a king kutter 60” and it works great. The ground that I am tilling has not been touched in at least 20 years. It is a forward rotation tiller and I paid $1549.00 at Farm and Fleet.
Farm and Fleet, will also order anything form the brands/manufacturers they sell, even if it's not a normally stocked/ordered item. If you can give them a manufacturers part number, they can order it. They work to make the customers happy.
 

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I will echo what many others have said, start with the tiller. It is the biggest cost and the most functionality to start, and delivers a plant able bed. I made the mistake of buying that 'other' TSC 4 ft tiller "designed for sub-compacts" but it will not fit Cat1 quick hitch without changing the draft pins. The one you linked would be good although after watching my 1025R drive the 4 ft I would get the 5 ft version to be sure my wheel tracks were covered since I also have Bro-Tek wheel spacers. I do have hard clay with the small stones you mention, quite a few up to 6 inches, and a bunch up to 6 ft (yeah, ft, the things have to weigh at least a ton). With multiple passes the TSC tiller will dig at least 6 inches as it descends with each pass. Slow speed lets it break the soil smaller in fewer passes, be sure to switch directions and angles with each pass and keep the back door down for smoothest results. After you have the stones out you can think about reverse rotation for finer surface but to start you don't need it chucking rocks at you. Have fun with it, I sure do!
 

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Those are made about 4 miles from me; I've been in the factory and he builds stuff to last. The equipment is more expensive than you might find elsewhere, but you won't find anything built better. The owner of Everything Attachments has been around here for a long time in the tractor and implement business.
 

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This is a mix of shale rock mostly with a little dirt mixed in. Was packed like concrete. Done with 2025R with 2 inch wheel spacers. Covers tracks well. Was happy to have forward rotation when hitting big rocks. After 2 passes it was 6 inches deep.




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I am trying to decide what exactly I need. I'm planning on having a couple different plots maybe 50'X50' for planting all different kinds of fruits/vegetables. I have a 1025R. From what I've read it seems like I need something to break up the soil then go back with a tiller for planting. The ground is mostly clay with some small rocks (1-1.5" diameter max). Not this year but in the future I'll also be spreading compost/manure throughout. It seems like what may be best is a subsoiler like this: https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/countyline-subsoiler and also a tiller: probably a 48" something like this: https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/countyline-rotary-tiller-4-ft?cm_vc=-10005
Is that the best for prepping for planting? Or am I missing something better? My dad recomended this: https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/countyline-medium-duty-disc instead of a tiller, but from what I've read it's similar to the subsoiler in that I use it first, then I still need the tiller.

I read several comments below but not all; it is a long string. But, the ones I did read may not truly understand the purpose for a subsoiler. It goes deep to break up the hardpan under the topsoil thereby allowing water and root penetration (for deep rooted plants such as alphalpha). We first used one back in the 1960s and completely turned that old farm around. Runoff was all but eliminated and crops really took off.

CAUTION: check with Miss Utility before using the subsoiler because it goes very deep!

I pull mine with the 1025r with no trouble but it won’t set any speed records.

As for the tiller vs. other implements, I use a tiller as it does it all in one or two passes (except busting open rows for planting taters - I can drag a hoe much quicker without the tractor compacting the soil). The tiller comes in handy for thoroughly mixing in leaves & other organic matter (consider adding lime).
 
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