Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anyone know if this is poison sumac? We have a bunch of these trees around our property and a branch recently came down and I’m hesitant to touch it.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,159 Posts
Oh good lord..

I thought poison oak was bad...At least thats a bit more reconizeable.

It looks like you could eat it.

Not that I'd consider it but its got that come and get me look.


Is this for realz...??

:munch:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
I have lots of that on my property also. I think the poisonous variety has white blooms not red like what you have. I don’t have any white/poisonous either. BTW, in the fall, the leaves turn color and they look awesome!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
927 Posts
That might be a mimosa tree. Are there others just like it nearby? Mimosa is an invasive tree, and there is rarely just one of them. Not poisonous.
Then again, it might not be a mimosa tree.

Edit: Just looked at some google images of poison sumac trees. It sure looks like the same thing you got.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
That is just plain sumac. It is good bird food, spreads and grows fast, and isn't too hard to remove. It will take over a field in a few years if you let it. The branches are soft then a bit brittle, not a strong tree.

If I remember correctly, poison sumac has 7 leaves per branch. I have never seen it get all that big but then I might have and didn't recognize it. I have plenty of poison ivy and poison oak here. All three affect me strongly. All cats do too, right up through the big ones. I guess that is why they like me so much.

If you react to the poison ivy/oak/sumac and get some sap on you, change clothes and wash affected areas with soap and water. If you already have blisters the best treatment I have found is cornstarch to dry them up. When the sores weep they spread so try not to scratch them.

It is the same sumac I have. When I am cleaning them up it is one of those I burn rather than chip or compost. It is real sappy when green and I really don't need it to spread any more than it has.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
450 Posts
Another very handy tip for working around the poison plants is to use a mechanics hand cleaner such as GOJO to wash any areas you may have touched the plant. The degreasing hand cleaners are very good at removing the oils that cause the reaction.

If you already have itchy spots the pumice variety of these cleaners does a good job of satisfying the urge to itch and again removes the oils from your skin which rapidly speeds up the healing process.

Plain old soap and water often times isn't strong enough to remove the sap. Think of it like trying to remove never seize from your fingers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
927 Posts
Another very handy tip for working around the poison plants is to use a mechanics hand cleaner such as GOJO to wash any areas you may have touched the plant. The degreasing hand cleaners are very good at removing the oils that cause the reaction.

If you already have itchy spots the pumice variety of these cleaners does a good job of satisfying the urge to itch and again removes the oils from your skin which rapidly speeds up the healing process.

Plain old soap and water often times isn't strong enough to remove the sap. Think of it like trying to remove never seize from your fingers.
And when you wash, use cold water. Warm/hot water will open up your skin pores and allow the evil oils to take hold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks guys. Still unsure whether it’s the poisonous variety or not. They are all over the property and I only want to remove the one branch that fell down close to our road. Guess I could always tyvek it up to be sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,528 Posts
Thanks guys. Still unsure whether it’s the poisonous variety or not. They are all over the property and I only want to remove the one branch that fell down close to our road. Guess I could always tyvek it up to be sure.
I think there’s an app for smartphones that will identify plants for you. :dunno:All you do is take a pic or 2 of the plant and the app identifies the plant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Also known as staghorn sumac...definitely not poisonous....a pink lemonade type of drink can be made from the red fruit.......I've made it drank it, and still here.....again....definitely not poisonous, nor should it break you out in any kind of rash.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
333 Posts
I just want to add that bees love it and will make a good honey crop from it.



:greentractorride:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Thanks guys. Still unsure whether it’s the poisonous variety or not. They are all over the property and I only want to remove the one branch that fell down close to our road. Guess I could always tyvek it up to be sure.
As said before, it is not poison sumac.. won't hurt you a bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Poison has white berries. We actually used the variety that you show for making sap spiles when making maple syrup. Cut the branches into 5" lengths, taper one end round to tap into the tree and taper the other end to fit inside a milk jug easily and you have your homemade spile. The branches have a soft pithy center that can be reamed out to let the sap out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for the clarification guys. Glad to hear I won’t need calamine lotion after I remove the limb. :good2:
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top