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I saw a you tube video of this and looks good and easy! If I understand correctly, it uses the existing electrical wiring of both house and shop as an antennae? I am coming out of my houses breaker box to the shop where there will be another breaker box. All off the same meter.
It will work provided you get a decent kit, not all ethernet over powerline systems are created equal. Netgear and Trendnet make decent solutions. BUT... running everything wireless is not a plug and play solution. You are much better off running wired ethernet but thats just my opinion. Once you get your network extended over to the barn, you really want to run cables anyways since you will have to provide power to the cameras. Since you are running cables you might as well run the one back to the house and simply avoid other issues. I would not run power over ethernet unless I had no other choice.

The better security cameras use what is known as PoE or Power over Ethernet. This simply means plugging in an extra small box (think smaller than a deck of cards) between the switch and each camera. This centralizes all of your power requirements to one spot. Alternatively you have to have power wherever you have a camera. PoE is easier and more reliable.

My security system runs PoE and I have a UPS plugged into PoE modules, this means my security system kkeeps running even if I lose main power.

If you have a generator, you may run into problems with powerline ethernet simply because most generators don't create clean power but you could get lucky.

Having things wired makes troubleshooting easy. With wireless its easy to run into problems that are hard to diagnose. I run wireless for my main connections because I don't have a choice (6-10 mile links). Once I get to either end, I run wired connections because I know everything will just work.
 

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Another option to extend your home network to the new barn is “powerline Ethernet”. Basically plug a device into an electrical socket one on house one in barn. Each device has an Ethernet jack on it / think of it as just a long network cable. Then you can plug a WiFi access point in the barn if you want. I have this to network a detached building on my property and run a couple security cameras over it. Haven’t touched it on the 3 years since I put it in, no issues. If everything is running back to same electrical meter it should work . Kits are $50-$100 ish
This is a good option if you don't have an option for copper, and if it's not too far away.

This is the kit I have to run to my barn, about 100 ft away from house. TP-Link AV1000 Powerline Ethernet Adapter - Gigabit Port, Plug&Play, Power Saving(TL-PA7010 KIT) Amazon.com: TP-Link AV1000 Powerline Ethernet Adapter - Gigabit Port, Plug Accessories

I just wanted to run an Echo in the barn, so this works, along with an old wifi router.

If I had plans of running more stuff, I'd do a point up point wireless.

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When we built this house 30 years ago, networking and internet weren't a consideration. To get wifi out to my heated storage and workshop which is about 85 feet away in a stick-built 20x30 building, I put in a MESH router system about a year ago and that gets good wifi out there. But I agree with KennyD that conduit and CAT6 is the way to go. Likely more secure, but at $125 for 500 feet of CAT6 and Schedule 40 2-inch conduit at about $.80 a foot, that route would be substantially cheaper.

For security, I use Nest cameras which notify me of any visitors and keeps a record, and it works well for me. I don't know anything about SimpliSafe other than that SimpliSafe and Renewal by Andersen together are responsible for about 75% of my email SPAM.:banghead:
Would 2 or even 1 1/2 inch water line work for you? It's considerably cheaper than conduit here, and you can get it in 100 foot lengths.
 

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Would 2 or even 1 1/2 inch water line work for you? It's considerably cheaper than conduit here, and you can get it in 100 foot lengths.
Following this question. Good idea since i will be going around some trees also. Was planing on 45 and 90 degree turns but a gentle curve would be better digging and such.
 

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Would 2 or even 1 1/2 inch water line work for you? It's considerably cheaper than conduit here, and you can get it in 100 foot lengths.
Probably would have if I had had the need, but some plain old 6UF for power and a couple of 14-2 UF’s in the same trench for phone (back when people had wired phones) was all I needed. I had insufficient foresight to realize that home networking and the internet would be a thing. Currently, MESH WiFi suits my outbuilding networking needs perfectly, so no need to go any farther. But yeah...if I was building today, I’d run some conduit. My son was a job foreman for an underground driller. Running conduit and pulling cable to a building 100 feet away would be a chip shot, probably cost me nothing.
 

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Would 2 or even 1 1/2 inch water line work for you? It's considerably cheaper than conduit here, and you can get it in 100 foot lengths.
Following this question. Good idea since i will be going around some trees also. Was planing on 45 and 90 degree turns but a gentle curve would be better digging and such.
I ran 3 runs of 3/4 PEX from my new attached garage to the pole barn and 2 runs to a detached garage. We had to trench anyhow because we cut the power to those buildings when digging the footings for the new garage.

3/4" PEX is plenty big to run multiple runs of CAT6 or fiber. As mentioned it is easier to get sweeping curves to make it easier to pull through. It is also pretty cheap. I was buying 300' spools for $85 I think.

Here is where they all come up into the new garage in an area that will be a utility room. There is the 5 runs of 3/4" PEX that will be used for various things (Air, water and internet) There is an insulated loop of 1" PEX which is for heating to the pole barn. That is the green stuff. There is 2x 2" conduit to the pole barn and a 2" conduit to the other detached garage. Then another 2" conduit to the side of the house where the meter box is to pull power into this space as well as a 1" conduit to bring internet into the utility room. A 2" white pipe that is going to be used for a drain for a sink to the septic system. Oh and the gas line for the boiler.



This is what it looks like now that we are ready for cement.

 
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