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I recently had a detached garage built. I'm having 100A service run to the garage so that I can put in a 220V/50A circuit for a welder. While I'd like to learn this skill, whether or not I'll have time to in the near future is another question. But since I have the capacity, I want to provide the outet(s) for myself or perhaps someone down the road to take advantage of.

Which leads to my question...I've seen various opinions on welding inside a shop/garage vs outside. This makes me question the best place to position the outlet(s). Does it make more sense to position one near where I plan to have the "work area" in the rear of the garage, or should I position one near the overhead door (or even on an outside wall) to facilitate welding outside if welding inside is generally frowned upon?

I don't mind installing multiple outlets, but #6 or #8 wire is pricey and IMHO will be a lot harder to work with than even #10, so trying to not to be too over-ambitious (for once). What do you think?
 

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.....depends on the type of welder.....

if its a arc/stick welder......put the outlet where practical ..........just get long leads...

if its a roll around mig/wire welder .....put the outlet where practical........and build a heavy extension cord to roll the unit around


point is no matter where you put it ...it will be wrong...so put it where convenient.....personally i prefer the least run from the breaker box ..some people prefer the most central location to limit lead lengths
 

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Welding inside the garage is not really a problem as long as you have a concrete floor, decent ventilation and there aren't any flammable materials in the general vicinity of your welding area. In fact, if you are using shielding gas it is usually best to weld indoors as any wind can blow away your shielding gas.

Also, you can purchase a good quality 25-foot 8-gauge 50-amp extension cord from places like Cyber Weld for around $77 (50-foot is around $140). I have a 25-foot one and use it all the time with my welder.

That would allow you to have your fixed outlet in the back of the garage and use an extension if for some reason you need to work outside.
 

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How big is the garage, and where is the panel?

I just have one outlet in my garage and one in my pole barn attached directly to the panel. I changed the cord on my welder to a 25' one using a length of "SO" cord, so this work for me. I also bought a 25' extension cord with molded ends just in case I need more, and to use with my plasma cutter.

You can see the outlet in this picture under the panel.
 

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I mounted my outlet on the small section of wall between my 2 garage doors. It's ~10 ft from my garage breaker panel and I can use my welder either inside or out in the driveway. As others have already said, a decent extension cord will get electricity to where you want to use it.
 

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I recently had a detached garage built. I'm having 100A service run to the garage so that I can put in a 220V/50A circuit for a welder. While I'd like to learn this skill, whether or not I'll have time to in the near future is another question. But since I have the capacity, I want to provide the outet(s) for myself or perhaps someone down the road to take advantage of.

Which leads to my question...I've seen various opinions on welding inside a shop/garage vs outside. This makes me question the best place to position the outlet(s). Does it make more sense to position one near where I plan to have the "work area" in the rear of the garage, or should I position one near the overhead door (or even on an outside wall) to facilitate welding outside if welding inside is generally frowned upon?

I don't mind installing multiple outlets, but #6 or #8 wire is pricey and IMHO will be a lot harder to work with than even #10, so trying to not to be too over-ambitious (for once). What do you think?
At this point have you selected a welder yet? I'm more or less in the same boat as you. I will be getting my first welder. I decided on a Lincoln 140 which will run on dedicated 110 V circuit. I can always ad in 50A later for bigger unit. But since I don't see myself welding anything more than 1/4 inch with the Lincoln mig welder for now I can set up anywhere in my new barn.
I agree running #6 or 8 is pricey & so is the equipment. So why worry about it at all. When you have your equipment, that will determine what you need on the power side. Just my way of solving the energy problem. I think learning to weld will be fun & useful too. You can always ad in more outlets as your needs dictate.
 

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At this point have you selected a welder yet? I'm more or less in the same boat as you. I will be getting my first welder. I decided on a Lincoln 140 which will run on dedicated 110 V circuit. I can always ad in 50A later for bigger unit. But since I don't see myself welding anything more than 1/4 inch with the Lincoln mig welder for now I can set up anywhere in my new barn.
I agree running #6 or 8 is pricey & so is the equipment. So why worry about it at all. When you have your equipment, that will determine what you need on the power side. Just my way of solving the energy problem. I think learning to weld will be fun & useful too. You can always ad in more outlets as your needs dictate.
I was in the exact same situation as you and made the same decision. While the Handler 140 worked great, it was a big mistake. I too thought I would never need to weld thicker than 1/4 inch. I later installed a 220 line and regretted limiting myself to a 110 volt machine. Do yourself a favor and get a dual voltage machine with the quick change plugs that can run on 110 or 220. You will be glad you did.
 

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You might also consider where your going to put the 220v 80 gallon 5hp air compressor in the future. I put 3 60 amp outlets in. 1 is never used. The other 2, 1 is within 10’ of a front overhead, 1 10’ from the rear side overhead, I have a fused switch that plugs into that for my compressor or I can use it for the welder or for a generator if needed. That way if what I am welding something to big I can get it close to the door.
 

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I recently had a detached garage built. I'm having 100A service run to the garage so that I can put in a 220V/50A circuit for a welder. While I'd like to learn this skill, whether or not I'll have time to in the near future is another question. But since I have the capacity, I want to provide the outet(s) for myself or perhaps someone down the road to take advantage of.
If it's not too late to change this; I'd go 200amps.
 

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We are building a new attached garage and upgraded the power to the house to 400A and I have 200A going to the new garage which also feeds my shop.

You may be thinking welding right now but what is the use of this space? You only mentioned it is a detached garage. It kind of sounds like it is work space but is it also parking? I ask because it is easier to plan for an electric vehicle or two out there now than it is later. That is why I went with 200A for my garage. While you can charge an electric vehicle on 110V it is much better on 240. Depending on location you could use the same outlet for charging at some point as you do for welding.

As for location, I would consider charging points for the future more than welding points. As others mentioned get a welder cart and an extension cord. Really the only reason I weld outside is if I can't physically get the project into my shop. I have both an Arc Stick welder and a MIG. The MIG is by far my first choice as it is so much easier to weld with but there are more variables. Gas flow, is there too much wind and such and it is a little more fussy in wanting clean steel. That is the problem with MIG outdoors. If it is too big to fit in the door it is probably too rusty to MIG weld anyhow so I go to Arc welding.

Welding on cement is fine. You won't hurt the cement. However if you go with an epoxy floor, you will likely damage the floor so you would want a mat of some sort to lay on the ground. Preferably not something flammable. You can get a few welding blankets pretty cheap.

I don't know that I would mess with a straight 110V welder. You can't do enough with them. I have a Hobart 190 and wouldn't go below that. It is a 240V only welder. The only real reason to go with a small welder is portability if doing really light weight stuff. It is kind of nice to be able to weld from any outlet and if all you are doing is really thin metal then I guess it is fine but you are handicapping yourself. Hobart and other brands typically make a multi voltage welder. I want to say with Hobart that is the 230. It is around that size where it is a little bigger than the one I went with. I was going to go with the 230 but they didn't have any and the 190 was on sale for a price I had a hard time passing up on. I would look at staying around the 200A for a hobby welder.

As far as Miller/Hobart/Lincoln/other brands. You always have those that will follow one brand and that is fine. They will all weld and all have advantages. For instance why spend big money for a high end Miller that has a 100% duty cycle when all you are going to do for welding is tack a few things here and there. I would recommend finding a local welding shop. Buying your stuff there and going with one of the brands they stock. Your life will be better when you notice your last welding tip is shot on a Saturday and you could have just run to the local shop and picked one up but the ones they stock won't fit your welder. Now you are stuck ordering something and waiting for it to come in.
 

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I don't know that I would mess with a straight 110V welder. You can't do enough with them. I have a Hobart 190 and wouldn't go below that. It is a 240V only welder. The only real reason to go with a small welder is portability if doing really light weight stuff. It is kind of nice to be able to weld from any outlet and if all you are doing is really thin metal then I guess it is fine but you are handicapping yourself. Hobart and other brands typically make a multi voltage welder.
There are so many nice multi-voltage machines available today that unless you plan to run a fabrication shop and need a large high duty cycle machine there aren't many reasons not to get one. The portability factor is nice. I have used mine with a generator and I've also thrown it in the trunk and taken it to a friend and relatives place to do a repair for them (one other benefit to using flux core).

With a multi-voltage machine you can have portability when you need it and high capacity when you need it.

Like I said, as much as I like my Handler 140 (and it has welded everything I've ever asked it to - thick and thin) if I had to do over again I would have gotten a multi-voltage machine.
 

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You might also consider where your going to put the 220v 80 gallon 5hp air compressor in the future. I put 3 60 amp outlets in. 1 is never used. The other 2, 1 is within 10’ of a front overhead, 1 10’ from the rear side overhead, I have a fused switch that plugs into that for my compressor or I can use it for the welder or for a generator if needed. That way if what I am welding something to big I can get it close to the door.
Right there was your answer. If you are limited on power just know using all 3 at once will trip the breaker. My little shop has 60 amps going to it. I can use the 220 welder while the 220 air compressor is running. Both are on separate 50 amp circuits. Max amperage is at start up.
 

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There are so many nice multi-voltage machines available today that unless you plan to run a fabrication shop and need a large high duty cycle machine there aren't many reasons not to get one. The portability factor is nice. I have used mine with a generator and I've also thrown it in the trunk and taken it to a friend and relatives place to do a repair for them (one other benefit to using flux core).

With a multi-voltage machine you can have portability when you need it and high capacity when you need it.

Like I said, as much as I like my Handler 140 (and it has welded everything I've ever asked it to - thick and thin) if I had to do over again I would have gotten a multi-voltage machine.
Yeah, not saying I have anything against a multi-voltage one. Most are right around that 200A which is where I would shoot for in sizing a welder. I just would pass on a small 110v one like you also said. I think the 140 is a 110V anyhow.

I have run my 190 off my generator if I need portability. I have a big generator though.
 

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Thanks for all the replies. WRT electric car charging, already well-heeled for that in my main garage with one EVSE already and provisions for another. The detached garage is primary a tractorhaus/workshop for me. The next owners will have 100A service to do with as they will. By then, we'll be all driving/piloting Spinners anyway. :)
 

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Yeah, not saying I have anything against a multi-voltage one. Most are right around that 200A which is where I would shoot for in sizing a welder. I just would pass on a small 110v one like you also said. I think the 140 is a 110V anyhow.

I have run my 190 off my generator if I need portability. I have a big generator though.
Yes, the Handler 140 is 120v. I only mentioned it because the OP was considering a Lincoln 140 which is also 120v.

I also have an inverter-based 250A stick welder that I use for anything over 1/4". I have ran it multiple times on my Honda EU6500i generator but the maximum amperage I could dial up was about 200A before the generator started to complain.

I once needed to repair something for my brother so I loaded the generator and stick welder on my landscape trailer and went mobile. It worked quite nicely. :)
 

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I was in the exact same situation as you and made the same decision. While the Handler 140 worked great, it was a big mistake. I too thought I would never need to weld thicker than 1/4 inch. I later installed a 220 line and regretted limiting myself to a 110 volt machine. Do yourself a favor and get a dual voltage machine with the quick change plugs that can run on 110 or 220. You will be glad you did.
Everyone's situation & future intentions are different. Here's mine. I'm retired. In my entire life I've never had a serious occasion to weld anything. I do not own any equipment that has any steel that even comes close to 1/4 inch thick. I do not build or fabricate auto bodies or anything like it. I'm not offering any kind of welding services to anyone in the public domain.
I'm not an artist or intend to build any artsy fartsy stuff. I want to learn how to weld & I will be doing that by the tried & true method (for me anyway) of self taught.

Now having said all that, I agree with the suggestion given in your post above. And if I were a younger guy into hobbies like automotive restorations or owned heavy equipment that needed maintenance, or a shop doing metal fab work for hire, I most certainly would do as you suggested. So I'm not going to spend money & effort on stuff just "in Case" I have a future need. If I DO NOT have a need now or in the foreseeable future, it's off the table. It's like this. I know people who will go out & spend piles of money on electronic junk like smart phones or super high end computers when all they need is a cell phone to make a call on, or a computer to surf the net. They all tell me that they have no need for the high end stuff but it's there, "Just in case". I find that to be really funny, because I tell them that by the time they "have that need" the equipment you have will be obsolete! I've lived long enough & wasted enough money on "future" needs that never occur, I now only plan for the immediate situation. But as I said, I like your suggestion, however it does not fit my needs. :bigbeer:
 

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Thanks for all the replies. WRT electric car charging, already well-heeled for that in my main garage with one EVSE already and provisions for another. The detached garage is primary a tractorhaus/workshop for me. The next owners will have 100A service to do with as they will. By then, we'll be all driving/piloting Spinners anyway. :)
If mainly a workshop then I would look at other things that may be 240V. If you get into woodworking, many bigger saws are 240V. Bigger air compressors are 240V.

Part of this comes down to wall space and breaker panel space but I have one outlet per wall that has 3/4" flexible conduit run from the box to the panel. For now it is 20A (14AWG Copper) on a dedicated circuit. I can always pull that out and run 6 AWG Copper which will do 50A 240V to that outlet. On my back wall which is longer (40') I have two outlets. However, I also have a much larger 200A service panel so I have plenty of breaker slots for a couple dedicated single outlets. For now, these outlets are nice because I can shut down power to other outlets/lights to do work while keeping these dedicated outlets hot to run drills, saws, lights and whatever I need while working out there. Yet shut down other circuits that are not needed. Not something I will need that often but it is handy. It was a little more expensive for those outlets but not ridiculous. Another tip if not too late. All boxes (even if only a single outlet) are deep double boxes and necked down to a single with the mud ring. This gives a lot more room for working and adds minimal cost.
 

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Yes, the Handler 140 is 120v. I only mentioned it because the OP was considering a Lincoln 140 which is also 120v.
And the only reason I went with the Handler 140 over the Lincoln is, the documentation on the Lincoln stated it will not work with a portable generator due to some frequency stuff I didn't understand because silly me went to school for auto mechnics, not electrical engineering. :laugh::laugh: So the ability to move the welder out of the garage into somewhere remote with a generator pushed me into the Handler. Plus the fact it was on sale for $499. :mocking:
 

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I recently had a detached garage built. I'm having 100A service run to the garage so that I can put in a 220V/50A circuit for a welder. While I'd like to learn this skill, whether or not I'll have time to in the near future is another question. But since I have the capacity, I want to provide the outet(s) for myself or perhaps someone down the road to take advantage of.

Which leads to my question...I've seen various opinions on welding inside a shop/garage vs outside. This makes me question the best place to position the outlet(s). Does it make more sense to position one near where I plan to have the "work area" in the rear of the garage, or should I position one near the overhead door (or even on an outside wall) to facilitate welding outside if welding inside is generally frowned upon?

I don't mind installing multiple outlets, but #6 or #8 wire is pricey and IMHO will be a lot harder to work with than even #10, so trying to not to be too over-ambitious (for once). What do you think?
I made an adapter and use two 110vac circuits for 220. Easy to do just use the hot from each circuit to each leg of your 220. Neutrals of 110 circuit are not used or you can tie them to ground. Makes it nice cause you have 220 now in most places if you have more than one 110v circuit. You can use any extension cord and you make a pigtail that has the 220 at one end to plug into your welder cord and out of that there are two 110v plugs that will plug into the two extension cords one from each of two different circuits.
 
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