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We took possession in July 2018...had all the normal inspections for our area, and even got the seller to pay for a structural engineer, since disclosure statement said had to tear up, re-fill, and replace garage floor and first 20 feet of driveway. The garage had sunk / settled.

Engineer said house had some "settling" issues, but was stable now. Recommended some back fill around foundation.

Small unincorporated town of about 150, where everyone knows everyone. My current neighbor is good friends with one of the previous owners of my house (not immediate past owner). We got to talking over a few beers and I asked about the downspouts.

There are eight downspouts on the house, and all but two of them terminate in to the ground in to 6 inch corrugated drainage pipe.

I've been looking for the exits to the drain pipes in the yard, but never found any.

Previous owner: "Oh no, those don't drain out or exit in the yard. I just got a post hole digger, drove down 4-5 feet next to the house, filled with river rock, and ended it right there..."

I about fell of my chair!

So this spring I will be digging up my yard, installing drainage pipe that exists well away from the house.

The most fun one will be right next to driveway...I will have to go under the sidewalk. Ugh.

20180726_061852.jpg
 

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We took possession in July 2018...had all the normal inspections for our area, and even got the seller to pay for a structural engineer, since disclosure statement said had to tear up, re-fill, and replace garage floor and first 20 feet of driveway. The garage had sunk / settled.

Engineer said house had some "settling" issues, but was stable now. Recommended some back fill around foundation.

Small unincorporated town of about 150, where everyone knows everyone. My current neighbor is good friends with one of the previous owners of my house (not immediate past owner). We got to talking over a few beers and I asked about the downspouts.

There are eight downspouts on the house, and all but two of them terminate in to the ground in to 6 inch corrugated drainage pipe.

I've been looking for the exits to the drain pipes in the yard, but never found any.

Previous owner: "Oh no, those don't drain out or exit in the yard. I just got a post hole digger, drove down 4-5 feet next to the house, filled with river rock, and ended it right there..."

I about fell of my chair!


So this spring I will be digging up my yard, installing drainage pipe that exists well away from the house.

The most fun one will be right next to driveway...I will have to go under the sidewalk. Ugh.
What a great idea................................ :banghead: :lol:
 

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As an engineer myself, I'd be curious if your structural engineer's report mentioned the soil type under your slab or foundation. When I lived in Colorado the first time, draining water near the house was not recommended due to the bentonite clay in the soil, which would swell and heave the slab and basement walls, creating havoc. The clays in the gulf coast area in Texas where I lived after selling the Colorado home dried and cracked in the baking summer sun. If the foundation wasn't watered a couple of times per summer, the slab would slump and potentially cause structural damage.

Knowing your basic soil composition before hole digging would be an important first step for me,

Brian

We took possession in July 2018...had all the normal inspections for our area, and even got the seller to pay for a structural engineer, since disclosure statement said had to tear up, re-fill, and replace garage floor and first 20 feet of driveway. The garage had sunk / settled.

Engineer said house had some "settling" issues, but was stable now. Recommended some back fill around foundation.

Small unincorporated town of about 150, where everyone knows everyone. My current neighbor is good friends with one of the previous owners of my house (not immediate past owner). We got to talking over a few beers and I asked about the downspouts.

There are eight downspouts on the house, and all but two of them terminate in to the ground in to 6 inch corrugated drainage pipe.

I've been looking for the exits to the drain pipes in the yard, but never found any.

Previous owner: "Oh no, those don't drain out or exit in the yard. I just got a post hole digger, drove down 4-5 feet next to the house, filled with river rock, and ended it right there..."

I about fell of my chair!

So this spring I will be digging up my yard, installing drainage pipe that exists well away from the house.

The most fun one will be right next to driveway...I will have to go under the sidewalk. Ugh.

View attachment 664696
 

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I had to get rid of the water from a 25X40 shed roof,,

I dug a trench to a spot between two 20"+ trees, and put in a 6 foot x 30 inch section of septic drainage field cover.





I did "T" a pipe up to grade with a water emitter, but, water has never accumulated in the pipe at all,,



The water has been going into the ground for almost 4 years,, and it seems to be perfect.
2018 was the wettest year on record for our area,, over 23 inches above average rain,,, and the gutter pipe is perfect.

I guess I would not do this, if there was a basement near,, but,, no basement,,
the big trees LOVE the extra water!! :good2:
 

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I have never heard of such a thing. Well I take that back. I have heard of dry wells, but not small ones at each downspout right next to the house. I believe the builder misunderstood the concept of dry wells for downspouts. The dry wells I have seen are large holes dug away from the house. The hole is filled with large gravel & the downspouts are tiled the to the dry well. I have seen dry wells as large as many feet across & deep down to the size of barrels.

If you have trees near your house, where small sticks can fall into the down spouts, do not use corrugated tile. The small sticks will get caught in the corrugated tile, then leaves get caught on he sticks & plug the tile. Use smooth wall pipe instead.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
As an engineer myself, I'd be curious if your structural engineer's report mentioned the soil type under your slab or foundation. When I lived in Colorado the first time, draining water near the house was not recommended due to the bentonite clay in the soil, which would swell and heave the slab and basement walls, creating havoc. The clays in the gulf coast area in Texas where I lived after selling the Colorado home dried and cracked in the baking summer sun. If the foundation wasn't watered a couple of times per summer, the slab would slump and potentially cause structural damage.

Knowing your basic soil composition before hole digging would be an important first step for me,

Brian

No mention of soil type. He didn't realize most downspouts terminated in the ground. The bold section below reference the two downspouts that do not terminate in the ground.

Here is wording from the engineers' report:

"There are several repaired vertical cracks in the south foundation wall. There are also repaired mortar joints at the front of the garage. The crack and joint seal repairs are in good condition. There is one stair-step crack at the southeast corner of the foundation where the sealant has cracked on the exterior of the house. The concrete block at the southeast corner has not shifted significantly. The walls are vertically plumb and in good condition. There is a repaired vertical crack in the north wall near the back edge of the front porch concrete stoop.

The soil next to the north and south foundation walls has settled and the grades are low next to the house.

OPINION:

The seller disclosure was provided to me prior to inspection of the site. The current owner stated that the garage floor had been replaced, the foundation had been sealed and repaired due to settlement and drain tile had been added to drain standing water from the southwest corner of the property. This work was completed in 2015.

The cracks observed are the result of differential settlement. Differential settlement is when a structure’s foundation does not settle evenly. Minor settlement occurs in all structures set on footings and normally reaches a point of equilibrium. In the case of this house, it is my opinion that the lack of drainage of the areas at the front of the house resulted in water soaking into the soil and draining underground around the structure towards the creek down gradient. This will have increased settlement towards the rear of the house which resulted in the foundation wall cracks observed in the north and should foundation walls. The installation of drain tile directed the water away from the structure and appears to have resolved the cause of the differential settlement. The foundation in its current state is in good function condition and the repairs made are functioning properly. The structural stability of the house is good, the house is structurally sound, and no major repairs are required.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

• Add soil next to the north and south foundation walls to raise grades and keep water away from the foundation walls.
• Replace the cracked seal at the southeast corner of the house to prevent moisture from entering the foundation wall.
• Repair of the interior foundation cracks is not necessary.
Monitor the downspout drainage pipes that discharge to the creek east of the house to ensure that they are clear of debris and free flowing. Their failure to discharge collected roof drainage will result in water discharging next to the foundation which can lead to future problems.
• Maintain gutters free of debris.
• Monitor the identified cracks for movement over time as is required for all structures."
 

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Ouch

No mention of soil type. He didn't realize most downspouts terminated in the ground. The bold section below reference the two downspouts that do not terminate in the ground.

Here is wording from the engineers' report:

"There are several repaired vertical cracks in the south foundation wall. There are also repaired mortar joints at the front of the garage. The crack and joint seal repairs are in good condition. There is one stair-step crack at the southeast corner of the foundation where the sealant has cracked on the exterior of the house. The concrete block at the southeast corner has not shifted significantly. The walls are vertically plumb and in good condition. There is a repaired vertical crack in the north wall near the back edge of the front porch concrete stoop.

The soil next to the north and south foundation walls has settled and the grades are low next to the house.

OPINION:

The seller disclosure was provided to me prior to inspection of the site. The current owner stated that the garage floor had been replaced, the foundation had been sealed and repaired due to settlement and drain tile had been added to drain standing water from the southwest corner of the property. This work was completed in 2015.

The cracks observed are the result of differential settlement. Differential settlement is when a structure’s foundation does not settle evenly. Minor settlement occurs in all structures set on footings and normally reaches a point of equilibrium. In the case of this house, it is my opinion that the lack of drainage of the areas at the front of the house resulted in water soaking into the soil and draining underground around the structure towards the creek down gradient. This will have increased settlement towards the rear of the house which resulted in the foundation wall cracks observed in the north and should foundation walls. The installation of drain tile directed the water away from the structure and appears to have resolved the cause of the differential settlement. The foundation in its current state is in good function condition and the repairs made are functioning properly. The structural stability of the house is good, the house is structurally sound, and no major repairs are required.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

• Add soil next to the north and south foundation walls to raise grades and keep water away from the foundation walls.
• Replace the cracked seal at the southeast corner of the house to prevent moisture from entering the foundation wall.
• Repair of the interior foundation cracks is not necessary.
Monitor the downspout drainage pipes that discharge to the creek east of the house to ensure that they are clear of debris and free flowing. Their failure to discharge collected roof drainage will result in water discharging next to the foundation which can lead to future problems.
• Maintain gutters free of debris.
• Monitor the identified cracks for movement over time as is required for all structures."
I think your structural engineer may have known his stuff but was a tad lazy in not finding out where the water discharge was. If you have significant cost, he may have some professional liability. At the very least, he should be ashamed of not being thorough in his investigation.

Treefarmer
 

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Dry well ,,YES but against your foundation NO

Dig a ditch one or two lengths of drain pipe from the corner of your house and then do the dry well.

My thought is , if your putting in a dry well against the foundation, what have you changed .... Water is still coming down the downspout and laying up against the foundation with or without the dry well. Yes with dry well it may move away form house a little but not enough if a major downpour or very large amounts of rain over a few days of week.
 

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I have never heard of such a thing. Well I take that back. I have heard of dry wells, but not small ones at each downspout right next to the house. I believe the builder misunderstood the concept of dry wells for downspouts. The dry wells I have seen are large holes dug away from the house. The hole is filled with large gravel & the downspouts are tiled the to the dry well. I have seen dry wells as large as many feet across & deep down to the size of barrels.
I agree. He had the right idea but implemented it 100% backwards.

I'm going to put in 3 dry wells next spring. I'm digging down 8'-9', laying a bed of gravel and then stacking cement block into a tower that will be ~5' tall. I'll backfill around that with 4" stone, cover with geo-fabric and then cover with 2' of topsoil to get it back to grade. The downspouts will drain into center of the tower which will be an open holding space for the water to collect as it waits to drain into the ground. All of that will be some 20' from the foundation.

Whoever his prior owner was just wasting his time. He dug the holes and then filled them right back up with rock. After one or two storms the soil probably backfilled right up against those stones and then you're right back to having no place for the rush of water from the downspouts to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all suggestions and advice.

Our property has a nice slope towards back of the house (walkout basement). You can see from this picture there is a creek to the right.

20180807_183936.jpg

My goal will be to get water away from house / foundation, and moving towards the creek.

A few will be with the Zip Hinge Downspout Hinge, and 4-6' extension (stock photo):

Zip Hinge.JPG

Or 6" corrugated pipe with pop-up drain (stock photo):

Pop up.JPG
 

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when we built our house we had a location of one downspout that was bad.
Ended in a corner by walk way and driveway.
Could not run downspout far from house.

Excavator came up with a neat idea.
We but a 3" pvc pipe in the ground and ran it under the steps/walkway and ran it about 50 ft away to run out on to the field.
I wish we would of run more of our downspouts out and away like that.

We did not use a pop up cover like you show, just ran it out to daylight.
Had a screen/grate at the end to keep critters out.
Had to remove it cause it got clogged with leaves even tho our house is about 100ft from the nearest tree.
It backed up to the end of the down spout on the house and water was gushing out everywhere.
Got rid of the grate/screen and all is well.
Our house sits in 3 acres of field, very small yard with the vast majority in native grasses and forbs.
Not fond of lawns, poor use of property.
 

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Our property has a nice slope towards back of the house (walkout basement). You can see from this picture there is a creek to the right.
My goal will be to get water away from house / foundation, and moving towards the creek.
A few will be with the Zip Hinge Downspout Hinge, and 4-6' extension (stock photo).
Or 6" corrugated pipe with pop-up drain (stock photo):
I tried dry wells in Northern Virginia clay and they did nothing because the soil was too hard to asbsorb enough water. I had a pop-up in Florida, but it restricted volume too much and clogged too easily. I recommend combining a dry well with a vertical "T" and a surface-level grate (cut out half of the cross bars to increase water flow. I agree thet getting 10 feet away from the foundation is usually plenty is the ground s properly sloped. Grass should grow over to completely hide the grate within a year.

 

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I tried dry wells in Northern Virginia clay and they did nothing because the soil was too hard to asbsorb enough water. I had a pop-up in Florida, but it restricted volume too much and clogged too easily. I recommend combining a dry well with a vertical "T" and a surface-level grate (cut out half of the cross bars to increase water flow. I agree thet getting 10 feet away from the foundation is usually plenty is the ground s properly sloped. Grass should grow over to completely hide the grate within a year.

Thats what I had in my pipe, it clogged after less than 1 year.
I now use nothing in the pipe.

I would avoid running the pipe up on the end, you will not drain the pipe completely, freezing issues and skeeter breeding grounds.
 

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Depending upon how cold it becomes or remains in NB, you may want to give some thought to providing a means of disconnecting the down spout from the drainage pipe in the winter. If it is cold enough, the pipe will fill up with water/ice and split it.

My downspouts drain into 4" SDR PVC which exits a gentle slope 20 to 30' from the structure. I have to disconnect the down spouts in the winter, here in MN.

DSCN0506.JPG

DSCN0507.JPG

The 4" grated covers, flush with the concrete slab, are vents as is the green grated pop up.
 

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So much wrong with that drain system.
They might as well have had nothing.
To keep water out of your crawl/basement, and keep it from negatively impacting your foundation, you need to have the water drain at least 6' from the structure.
You also need to be sure the grade slopes away from the structure so that rainwater not from the roof doesnt collect and do the same thing.

These are all issues Im dealing with here, and have seen MANY MANY times, and quite a few people have no idea that its a problem. Some people even think no gutters at all is fine.
I suppose if you live where it never rains, thats fine...but not in Indiana, or much of anywhere else.

On drywells, Id make sure to check out what others use in your area.
Around here, going 8-9' deep will just end up with you having water shooting out your downspout connections as it fills up when the ground is saturated. Water runs off, but also soaks into the ground, and the deeper it is the longer it takes to dry out, you will generally hit water around here at those depths in Spring and sometimes Fall, especially when its been as wet as it has around here lately.
Generally, they are only about a foot down, then maybe 3-4' deep.
A better idea is a drain that takes it away from the house, to a natural slope, without any kind of basin to catch it, but those dont always work in every situation.

One of my Spring projects is going to be regrading around two sides of the house, digging a swale, and maybe installing underground drains in a few areas to get rid of excess water.
 

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I understand your pain. We purchased this 1992 house in October and for some reason not only do the gutters drain straight onto the ground and not into the piping, but they intentionally capped every single drain pipe that leads to the soil. I won't be wasting time in the spring trying to snake it or trouble shoot it. It's going to be more feasible to rent a mini ex (since I don't own a TLB yet :banghead: ) and dig around the foundation and lay in new piping. I'm not a fan of the corrugate stuff, I'll be going with a hard pvc of sorts and then daylight it into the woods, similar to my sump pump does.

Photo Sep 13, 9 33 37 AM.jpg
 

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Don't forget to include clean-outs in your underground piping.

Use pipe that will withstand you driving your tractor over it. The cheap stuff can be cracked and cave in.

This may be a great reason to get a tractor with a backhoe. Not that you need a reason.

For digging under the sidewalk: I had to do this a few years ago to put in an irrigation line. I had one of those metal paint stirrers that you put on an electric drill. I bent the blades on it to be a bit more aggressive. Then I bought a long extension piece (I think 2' in my case) to put between the stirrer (now digger) and the drill. I worked it from both sides, eventually meeting in the middle. You drill the digger into the dirt a bit and then pull it out to clear the channel. This approach went very fast. I think I used a corded drill, but today's cordless drills have plenty of power and time on one battery.
 

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I understand your pain. We purchased this 1992 house in October and for some reason not only do the gutters drain straight onto the ground and not into the piping, but they intentionally capped every single drain pipe that leads to the soil. I won't be wasting time in the spring trying to snake it or trouble shoot it. It's going to be more feasible to rent a mini ex (since I don't own a TLB yet :banghead: ) and dig around the foundation and lay in new piping. I'm not a fan of the corrugate stuff, I'll be going with a hard pvc of sorts and then daylight it into the woods, similar to my sump pump does.

View attachment 664906
Seeing you have a Radon Mitigation system, its possible those exterior drains ran into the sump pit, or tied into it.
The system works on negative pressure, and if they were connected, even in one spot, that system wouldnt work.
I cant think of any other reason to cap them, but since quite a few around here drain similarly, Id assume thats whats going on.
Given that, Id be careful about digging near them. You dont want to break open a line and have your system sucking air.
 

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There are eight downspouts on the house, and all but two of them terminate in to the ground in to 6 inch corrugated drainage pipe.

I've been looking for the exits to the drain pipes in the yard, but never found any.

Previous owner: "Oh no, those don't drain out or exit in the yard. I just got a post hole digger, drove down 4-5 feet next to the house, filled with river rock, and ended it right there..."

I about fell of my chair!

At my previous house I hired a company to do the landscaping on the 5,000 square foot 'burb lot as I didn't want to do it; nor did I have the time with the workload at the office. It turns out that idiot just connected black corrugated pipe to the downspouts and ran them a few feet away from the house. None of them were daylighted. :banghead: Fortunately they weren't buried too deep so I found the ends and at least exposed the ends to get water away from the foundation. That nonsense is more common then you think with the lazy/shoddy contractor mentality of, 'Out of sight, out of mind.'

As an engineer myself, I'd be curious if your structural engineer's report mentioned the soil type under your slab or foundation. When I lived in Colorado the first time, draining water near the house was not recommended due to the bentonite clay in the soil, which would swell and heave the slab and basement walls, creating havoc. The clays in the gulf coast area in Texas where I lived after selling the Colorado home dried and cracked in the baking summer sun. If the foundation wasn't watered a couple of times per summer, the slab would slump and potentially cause structural damage.

Knowing your basic soil composition before hole digging would be an important first step for me,

Brian
So many Front Range builders have wound up in court and/or going out of business because they won't follow the geotechnical engineer's recommendations for drainage.

I had to get rid of the water from a 25X40 shed roof,,




I did "T" a pipe up to grade with a water emitter, but, water has never accumulated in the pipe at all,,



The water has been going into the ground for almost 4 years,, and it seems to be perfect.
2018 was the wettest year on record for our area,, over 23 inches above average rain,,, and the gutter pipe is perfect.

I guess I would not do this, if there was a basement near,, but,, no basement,,
the big trees LOVE the extra water!! :good2:
I did something similar at Casa Lemon using end of run emitters because of the flat surface around this house. I wish I could have daylighted them; but it wasn't possible. Each emitter is at least 20' from the house, and the last 10' has pipe with drainage holes in it covered by filter cloth. All the pipe is bedded in pea gravel to allow for native soil movement that is isolated from the pipe. The only time the emitters discharged water was during the rare September 2013 downpours. Our place should be at least 1' to 2' higher out of the ground than it is in my opinion.

This is what I concocted for the downspout to underground pipe interface. It has a 'boot' to collect small shingle rocks, and the bottom sanitary tee is angled wrong so a hose can be inserted for flushing. I would have preferred not to do anything like this; but the builder finish graded this place with hardly any slope.

 

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