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In all the years of farming I never had much trouble hooking up the pto shafts on any of my equipment. Always kept the tractor's pto shaft clean and just hooked them up. For 350 dollars I think I'll stick with the basics.
Ron
 

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I've had issues, but it's because there's no way to turn the stub on the tractor and some of my implements are a pain to turn from the shaft to line up the splines.

I don't think his idea is dangerous (the graphic might be backwards for how the tabs engage in the slotted plate), but I also can't see paying $350 for one.

The biggest problem I have is that my lock pin is a little tweaked from my stump grinder seizing shafts when they twisted. I should just replace it, but haven't yet.
 

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I liked the old style

In all the years of farming I never had much trouble hooking up the pto shafts on any of my equipment. Always kept the tractor's pto shaft clean and just hooked them up. For 350 dollars I think I'll stick with the basics.
Ron
I had little trouble with the old style push in pins on the equipment and large tractors. I found the collar style and tighter quarters on the 790 more troublesome. I would say it's age but I can still hook up the 15' Bushhog and that PTO with cvc joints is heavy. (That doesn't go on the 790 for sure.)

I won't spend $350 for one of those either, but I thought it was interesting. For some of the folks on here that really struggle, it might be worthwhile although I still wonder what happens when you throttle down the tractor on a spinning implement while making a turn or otherwise pulling slightly on the PTO.

Treefarmer
 

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I've never had any problems attaching implement PTO shafts, especially at the rear of the tractor. Nothing I'd be interested in but YMMV.
 

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This is my take after watching both videos. Just for the record I don't have much experience with PTOs.
However I do have a lot of experience with drive shafts.

The real problem is when the 2 don't line up. Then witch is easier to turn? Tractor or shaft?
To me it looks like the plastic shaft guard is always in the way. Making it difficult to work with the coupling. Not having a PTO guard (on the tractor) that flips up won't help access.
This product is just putting the problem out in the open. Giving your hands the needed room to work. Them red disks are larger and make it easier to twist.

The downside is you now have a spinning assembly without a guard. In the old days before shaft guards I'm sure it was easier to do it. However it was way easier to get hurt or killed by the spinning shaft.

Personally I would buy an extra coupler and make some kind of handle for it. Then you can use your new special tool like a socket. To rotate the shaft coming out of the transmission.
 

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For $350 No WAY. never had a problem connecting the rear pto.
 
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Since there's no way to "lock-in" the shafts together, I'd be skeptical it would come apart during use. Imagine a PTO shaft from a bush hog wailing about right behind you.
 

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Just too expensive. I do prefer the old push button PTO shaft ends though. Much easier to operate, but there must be a reason they don't all use it.
 

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In the "longer video", he said that there is some sort of retention pin that holds the plates together for when an implement is spinning down.

My question - which wasn't addressed in any of the videos - is "how easy is it to undo the plates when you're disconnecting the PTO?". Do those pins get wedged into those cam slots? :unknown:

All of my PTO shafts are collar types. I try to keep the shafts clean and that seems to help. One thing that gets in the way is the guard. Yeah, it swings up, but it's still in the way and is cumbersome. I wish there was a quick way to remove the guard, install the PTO shaft and then reinstall the guard.

All in all, I think I'll stick with what I've got.
 

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Personally I would buy an extra coupler and make some kind of handle for it. Then you can use your new special tool like a socket. To rotate the shaft coming out of the transmission.
I was actually thinking a "spanner" wrench type tool would make more sense. Make it slip over the groove diameter and it'd come out before you locked the knuckle in place.

I might have to whip one up when my finger is allowed to be used.
 

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Since there's no way to "lock-in" the shafts together, I'd be skeptical it would come apart during use. Imagine a PTO shaft from a bush hog wailing about right behind you.
It's odd that several of the photos on the website seems to show a bolt/nut through the two sections.
 

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I tripped across this on the net today. https://tractorptolink.com/easy-power-take-off-adapter/#tops

I can't decide if it's a great idea or likely to come loose and tear something up.

Treefarmer
I wonder if something like a chipper with a big flywheel that wants to keep spinning when you shut the pto off would unlock it.
It's odd that several of the photos on the website seems to show a bolt/nut through the two sections.
That's the safety pin he was talking about making sure that it doesn't come apart when hooked up. I don't know what all tractors are like when it comes to the rear PTO shaft but it's real easy to turn it when you have it bypassed on the tractor. I just put the tractor PTO level into mid position and turn the tractor PTO shaft by hand to get it lined up with the equipment PTO shaft. Nothing hard about it. I also keep both ends clean and sprayed with fluid film. How hard can it be?
 

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I don't know what all tractors are like when it comes to the rear PTO shaft but it's real easy to turn it when you have it bypassed on the tractor. I just put the tractor PTO level into mid position and turn the tractor PTO shaft by hand to get it lined up with the equipment PTO shaft. Nothing hard about it.
Levi, most if not all of the bigger tractors have a PTO brake that makes it impossible for an operator to turn the stub shaft, regardless of PTO selection. That's really why this product has a market.
 

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That's the safety pin he was talking about making sure that it doesn't come apart when hooked up. I don't know what all tractors are like when it comes to the rear PTO shaft but it's real easy to turn it when you have it bypassed on the tractor. I just put the tractor PTO level into mid position and turn the tractor PTO shaft by hand to get it lined up with the equipment PTO shaft. Nothing hard about it. I also keep both ends clean and sprayed with fluid film. How hard can it be?
Just ain't that much space down in there when you're holding the end of a safety collar for a series 7 knuckle.

How big of shafts are you using?

20150919_150238-1-1[1].jpg
 

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Levi, most if not all of the bigger tractors have a PTO brake that makes it impossible for an operator to turn the stub shaft, regardless of PTO selection. That's really why this product has a market.
Mine doesn't have a brake, but you are turning an 11" clutch backwards through a 4:1 reduction drive (the hard way).
 
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