Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I hope to saw down a few large cedar trees which are aimed at my cottage. I intend to put a chain/cable on them attached to my tractor to persuade them to fall away from the cottage. My question is, should I hook to the rear of the tractor or the front? Which direction gives most pull forward or reverse? I have loaded rear turfs.
The same question applies to removing small stumps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
If your chain isn't longer than the height of the tree, it's a recipe for a momma of a headache.

But... I just dropped a snag, and I ran the chain from the top of the bucket down the backside then over to the trunk about six feet up above a branch, then dropped the bucket to provide a little tension. That's when I got out the chainsaw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,919 Posts
In my experience, pilling from the rear is much better than the front. I can drag more, have ripped out shrubs and such (prior to having a BH) with a chain hooked to the rear that when hooked to the loader it would not budge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
892 Posts
If diffs in a tractor work like a truck, pulling in a forward gear usually forces the ring into pinion. Reverse usually tries to spread them apart under load and can break teeth.

I've hooked to the drawbar with a cable to persuade a very tall tree into the correct landing spot before. Kept it under tension while dad cut with saw, then hammered down when it started falling.

Jim
 
  • Like
Reactions: 5304

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,665 Posts
I think pulling from the rear is best. The whole machine is designed to pull in that manner...from the big rear tires to the drawbar.
I pull trees out quite often. Just make sure you use the drawbar, and a long chain
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
1. Pull from the back making sure the chain, cable, rope, etc. is pointed below the rear axle. This will prevent loading the tractor high and potentially lifting the front end.

2. Use proper cutting techniques and your tree will fall where ever you want it. If you make the cuts improperly even the tractor may not get it to go where you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
1. Pull from the back making sure the chain, cable, rope, etc. is pointed below the rear axle. This will prevent loading the tractor high and potentially lifting the front end.

2. Use proper cutting techniques and your tree will fall where ever you want it. If you make the cuts improperly even the tractor may not get it to go where you want.
The tree(s) is slanting very much in the wrong direction. Even if I cut the wedge in the right direction I think that I'll need power assistance for a positive outcome. I'll insure my job with a come-along attached also. My cottage and large window would suffer if I make a mistake. I hope to use a chain. Thanks for the advice from all.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,884 Posts
Pull from the rear, make sure your chain or cable is long enough ,make sure of your angle cut is just a tad deeper than normal and above all do this on a NON WINDY day..

Be Safe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,919 Posts
Be careful! Gravity is a real b***h in these circumstances. If that tree is leaning too far, there may be no way your tractor can keep up with the rate of drop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
892 Posts
I should add I had 125 ft of cable tied ~25 ft up the tree. Tree was ~70 ft tall. I could lean it with the tractor once it was decently cut and I actually initiated the fall. I had overloaded ballast box (950 or so lbs) loaded tires and the loader on. Figure I was 4500 lbs or so. But ya, it was still nerve racking.

I was in high range too. :)

Jim
 
  • Like
Reactions: RedOregon
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top