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Discussion Starter #1
Ok tractor men, I have a question about eyeglasses. About 12 years ago I rapidly and suddenly lost my abuility to read. Panicked, I rushed to an eye Dr. for an exam and they laughed and said I was just getting old and needed reading glasses. Worked my way up to 2.5 diopters by now. Lately my abuility to see correctly at distance has decayed, so I went for another exam. I asked about contacts maybe but they recomended bifocals. They said this would be the simplest way to get the proper near and far correction as my eyes have each a different prescription required. Picked out glasses, got "no Line" bifocals with AR coating front and rear. $ 535.... not including exam. Glasses came in and I went to pick up and have skull fit adjusted. Results: Vision at 5-10 feet much improved. Woman at store put up a reading chart that measured about 5 inches wide and 8 long. She place the card about 15 inches from my face on a rack. The words on top the chart were larger font than the descending rows of words. I cocked my head back to read through the lower part of the lenses and reported to her that I only had a circle of clarity that was legible. If I looked at the center of the largest line of words then the first word or two and the last word or two were blurry. If I looked at the center of the card there was a distinct circle that was legible. Changing the distance from my face did not change the effect. She said this is what is to be expected and I just need to wear them and get used to them? Stated I should try them a while and the eye clinic would make things right if I felt the glasses could not be used as intended.
At work they are completely useless, can't read my computer monitor on my desk unless I tip my head WAY back and have only a 3 or 4 inch focal are on my 21 inch screen. Blueprint reading right under my nose is same deal. I can put on my dime store readers and see everything fine.

My question (finaly) is what is the normal usabuility of bifocals for folks with a lot of reading in their life? Should I have more field of view than I seem to? Who besides me thinks they messed these up?
Sorry to have to ask here but I don't have enough people in my life who wear bifocals to ask what is normal.
Thank you, I look forward to any advice on this.
 

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I've worn progressives for guessing 20+years. The first pair of progressive company glasses, could not see with them no way no how.. Went to the fellow I had always used, he made me a pair,,no problem.

Thinking you should be able to read better than what your saying. Yes you have to till your head back but depending on what distance and size of print ,whether you read from the middle or the lower part of the lenses. Also your only seeing, or at least mine , in a 1/2-3/4" area down the middle of both lenses.
The company made lenses were only about 1/4-1/2" wide area.
I had gone from regular bifocals to progressive ,for about the first 2-3 months , if I looked at a straight line I seen it as having a curve .
My wife went straight from no bifocals to progressive, she had no problem what so ever.

Stranger things have happened , wondering if the lenses where made wrong. Right should be your left and left should be the right.
 

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I have no-line bifocals with photo darkening lenses and get along good with them for normal outside/inside stuff (and shooting through a scope). But for computer work - like right NOW, I use readers also in 2.5 diopters. Normal bifocals are made assuming your reading something in your hands at chest level. Doesn't work for computers when you're looking more or less straight ahead.

It will take a little time for your computer (brain) to adapt to the no-lines, but you'll like them after awhile.

Gizmo2 told me about 2.5 cheaters for my welding helmet - I still owe him a beer for that!:bigbeer:
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks guys. I knew I would have to read through the bottom part of the lens, but wondered if the narrow area of focus was normal?
 

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Thanks guys. I knew I would have to read through the bottom part of the lens, but wondered if the narrow area of focus was normal?
Yup - normal as green grass.
 

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I never liked the progressive lenses. Too much moving my head up and down to be able to see. I wore regular bifocals for many years as I got older, until I had cataract surgery and now I only need reading glasses. I preferred adjusting the distance between my eyes and the object, rather than moving my head up and down to try to get that little area where I could be able to see the object.

I went from being near sighted to being far sighted after cataract surgery. That was a BIG adjustment.

Dave
 

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They might have mixed up on the prescription or the height of the bifocal, but the narrow field of view is inherent to progressive lenses.

My first bifocals were lined and I could see just fine with them. For my next pair a few years later, my wife thought I should try progressives. I immediately felt like an owl, twisting my head back and forth to see things clearly that I could see with no problems with the lined bifocals. I kept the progressives for less than a week and went back to the shop for a new pair of lined lenses.

The bifocals section of my lenses are about 1" wide. Testing right now, I can see clearly using the bifocals about 45 degrees in each direction without moving my head. If I recall, the progressives had a in-focus width of 1/4" or so, and the angles were greatly reduced, therefore the bothersome turning of my head. They did not work for me. I'm lined for life. :geek:
 

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Oh , I'm hoping you was told , it will take time to adjust to these. One thing if you picked them up in the middle of the day . The next morning putting them on should make a difference. As others ,yes you will raise & tilt your head or have to turn your head inorder to see something. After wearing them for a month , no difference than wearing reg glasses, at least to me .
 

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Jeff B, I've been wearing Varilux progressive lenses for many, many years and really like like them.
Notes:
Took me about two weeks to figure out how to USE the progressive lenses.
I have never gotten a new pair that were correct the first time. The last pair were changed out 3 times.
The lenses should be to YOUR liking (within reason) not what the examiner THINKS they should be, BIG difference.
IMO, Loss of eye sight is pretty much a fact of life as we age. You will NEVER see as well as you did before no matter what lenses you have.
 

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I have no-line bifocals with photo darkening lenses and get along good with them for normal outside/inside stuff (and shooting through a scope). But for computer work - like right NOW, I use readers also in 2.5 diopters. Normal bifocals are made assuming your reading something in your hands at chest level. Doesn't work for computers when you're looking more or less straight ahead.

It will take a little time for your computer (brain) to adapt to the no-lines, but you'll like them after awhile.

Gizmo2 told me about 2.5 cheaters for my welding helmet - I still owe him a beer for that!:bigbeer:
Exactly the same here.

The muscles that control your eyes will get accustomed to this - just takes a little time. I had a heck of a time navigating stairs for the first couple weeks. But after a few weeks it became second nature for my eyes to instantly zero in on the bifocal part without even thinking about it.

And I have the $1 reading glasses all over the house - have to use them for the computer and also like them when doing some more intricate work.

My glasses get quite expensive also but I refuse to not look through very good lenses. No-line bifocals, Crizal anti-reflective coating (very important to me) and the Transitions since my eyes are very sensitive to light. I had to get a pair of Grandma sun glasses to use in the truck however.....

Still have some difficulty shooting - have yet to find the right glasses to use. I have ghost sights on my lever action rifles (scopes on lever rifles just look silly in my opinion) and have a hard time getting my bifocal lined up properly with the sight without having my head at an awkward angle.
 

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I had a heck of a time navigating stairs for the first couple weeks. But after a few weeks it became second nature for my eyes to instantly zero in on the bifocal part without even thinking about it.
I've learned NOT to look at the stair steps as I'm going down them.
 

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I've learned NOT to look at the stair steps as I'm going down them.
I learned that also - but now that my speed on steps is more of a crawl I have to point my face straight down at each step to be sure my foot is in the right place - one step at a time......
 

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Good topic! I was blessed with excellent eye site for the first 40 some years, then came time for the "readers". Primary work was at the drawing board. That was OK but when I left the room, had to change to safety glasses for the shop. I went back and bought bifocals very soon after. Great, even up and down the stairs to my work area.
Then along came the computer and CAD. Bi-focals not so nice any more. After a while, I got the idea of tri-focal lenses. 1-2' for keyboard, 2-4' for monitor (and walking, stair steps fantastic), and upper for anything beyond that. That was the ticket! Worked very well with "under the hood" problems on the car and truck too. Very good for dash to road. Not so good with welding. As age crept in further, night driving became more of a problem with two lines reflecting light from behind especially.
So last exam (at age 69) I tried the progressive lenses. I was able to adapt to them fairly well and they are much better with night driving. They do have the anti glare coating, my tri-focals do not. For shooting, scope or iron sights, or binoculars, I still remove the glasses. Both types work OK with a shotgun. I don't take them off for that.
My old tri-focals are always right here by the computer and always use them for this or if I want to do extensive reading. I will update them soon to the latest prescription but will continue using the progressive style for most everything else. Expensive for sure. Can't complain much about my sight yet, but am in the early stages of glaucoma, so things will not get better.

My wife has worn prescription lenses since she was 8 years old. Not real thick lenses, but must be made with some kind of prism in the prescription. That kept her with the heavy glass material for many years. She has tried the progressive type twice and cannot use them. Bi-focals have been her companion since her 40's also. Newer lens material has lightened them up for her. The anti glare coating has worked well too.

Hang in there. If finances permit, you might think about an extra pair with the tri-focal lens for more reading room without constant head movement. I do not have trouble switching back and forth between the two styles, but others may have a different story for you.

tommyhawk
 

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My experience over 45 years is that I have had the widest field of view with standard thickness plastic lenses. I am quite near-sighted and use bifocals and my lenses get fairly thick toward the outer edges. Manufacturers have tried to reduce this outboard thickness by various means of forming the lens as well as machining the correction. I have found that the "thinner" lenses trade off field of view for the vanity of a reduced outside profile.

I buy my glasses online at Zenni Optical and you can buy bifocals all day long under $75. Single vision really cheap. I also have single vision glasses all over the house and shop-computer glasses, reading glasses, under welding helmet glasses (also work laying under tractor), shooting glasses (front sight of handgun). I have my Walmart optometrist give me about 4 prescriptions when I'm in. He just has me hold out my hand where I want the focal point and he measures. Doesn't cost any more.

What I really need is "shopping glasses" for that distance standing in the aisle looking at labels on products on the shelf. Jay
 

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For safety glasses and even sunglasses, I've been getting bifocals from Discount Reading Glasses | Readers.com. Lots styles & power options available.

They're cheap and they have a lot of discounts you can take advantage of.
 

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For safety glasses and even sunglasses, I've been getting bifocals from Discount Reading Glasses | Readers.com. Lots styles & power options available.

They're cheap and they have a lot of discounts you can take advantage of.
While I was eating breakfast I thought about this for shooting. A pair of safety glasses with the proper magnification would work perfectly.

I don't have much distance correction - never thought of trying to shoot without my regular glasses. Will have to try that today to see if I can focus on the front sight. Using a ghost ring rear sight it blurs out anyway....
 

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I have been using these folks to buy my safety glasses for over 10 years.

Encon Veratti 2000 Bifocal Safety Glasses With Gray Lens

Cheap to buy but the quality is great. The lens is nice and clear, just pick your diopter for the bi's and your ready to go. They work great on the motorcycle, fits inside your helmet and the wind goes around the lens and not in your eyes. When they get too scratched, I just through them away. They also make them in clear. They do not work well in a welding helmet.
 

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I have worn the progressives for more years than I would like to admit. They have never been perfect, and some were so bad I could hardly use them. I still wear them, but they are no good for reading. I just bought a pair of reading glasses at a discount store and I manage quite nicely now. My progressives are fine for driving and anything else except reading.
 

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I have been using these folks to buy my safety glasses for over 10 years.

Encon Veratti 2000 Bifocal Safety Glasses With Gray Lens

Cheap to buy but the quality is great. The lens is nice and clear, just pick your diopter for the bi's and your ready to go. They work great on the motorcycle, fits inside your helmet and the wind goes around the lens and not in your eyes. When they get too scratched, I just through them away. They also make them in clear. They do not work well in a welding helmet.
Nice! Automatic 10% off today - under $10 including shipping.

Edit to add: Ordered a pair in a different style which are very similar to the ones I used to have (minus the bifocals). I am prudent in wearing safety glasses when I am mowing - never seems to fail that something blows up toward my face. These will be perfect for my mowing glasses! Ever since I installed my temperature gauge last year it's been very frustrating not being able to read it.

 

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Good discussion topic.

I've been wearing lined bifocals for quite a few years, started with lined because I was cheap. I had my first pair of progressives through work (Work buys safety glasses, even prescription, every 2 years), even though I had to pay a little extra. I can only say that I did get used to my head moving side to side and up and down to read, but basically hated them. I just started using tri-focals for work safety glasses, it does take a little getting used to, but that mid-area is just about perfect for computer usage. It is also a narrow area and I do have to bob my head up and down to read the screen, but it was the same as my progressives, except the in-focus area is a little bit wider than the progressive "sweet spot".

Interesting that when I ordered the trifocals, I thought I could have all 3 sections set to something specific based on my eye doctor's prescription for close reading, computer work and distance. The eyeglass place told me that I could only specify the distance and close and that the "mid" is somehow computer generated to be somewhere in the middle. Since he said it was guaranteed, if I didn't like it, they would exchange back to bi-focals for free. Lucky for me that it turned out OK.

So I'm staying with lined bi or tri-focals , I like the fact that I can scan a much wider angle and stay in focus.

My wife started with progressives and continues with them. I politely say that if it's OK with her then OK with me. But I don't think she ever experienced the wider angle of focus of lined lenses.

Just my 2 cents.
 
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