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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

What do you use to slit the pipe?
What type of PVC pipe is best?
I am thinking of 2" diameter to increase its ability to scrape snow and leave less behind. Thoughts on diameter? Again, this is a paved driveway.

I have a 6ft rear blade (Tarter from Tractor Supply) that I have been using to scrape my paved driveway. I've thought of installing an UHMW plastic cutting edge to help save the driveway from scuffs and quiet it down when scraping. But I believe this would limit its ability to scrape ice, and I don't plan on swapping out plastic/steel cutting edges on a per storm basis.

So I thought of PVC pipe. Easier to take on/off (I think) than a replacement edge.

Thanks,
Thumper
 

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I used schedule 80 1.5" pipe on the front edge of my 120r loader bucket. It is gray in color but labeled as PVC. Others have said PVC is brittle in the cold and ABS is the way to go. Cut the slit on my table saw, but ran drywall screws through the center diameter of the pipe in several places along the length to keep the pipe from collapsing and pinching the saw blade. I hammered it on over the bucket edge and it has held up over several plowings on my asphalt drive so far. I think it is probably time to flip it over before the bottom wears through.
 
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PVC pipe comes in different colors, generally to signify its listed use in the construction industry. I've seen blue, red, brown, white, & grey. Black is typically ABS. My experience with ABS is that it's rigid but brittle, especially when cold. White PVC is also rigid but I believe it can withstand cooler temps than ABS. Grey PVC is for electrical installations and is flexible compared to white PVC. We use it for underground wiring and usually only bury it about 2 feet deep. When the ground freezes and shifts, it's flexible enough to move with the ground without breaking. I know white PVC comes in schedule 20 & 40, not sure if any thicker. Grey comes in 40 & 80.

To get back to your question, I would suggest 2". If you want a thicker pipe, get schedule 80 (what i would suggest). Grey 2" Schdl 80 should be available at an electrical supply house, or possibly Menards, Home Depot, etc.
The reason I suggest 2"....I put a pipe on the edge of my blade, but used RMC ([electrical] Rigid Metalic Conduit), but my plowing is on gravel & grass, not asphalt and little concrete. IIRC, I cut a 1-1/6" to 1-1/8" slot, which allows the pipe to have a "friction fit". The 2" diameter allows the pipe to go up high enough, above the nuts on the back that hold the factory (black) cutting edge to the blade. Being above the nuts keeps the pipe from coming off vertically. I cut the pipe I think 3" longer than the blade, to put bolts through the ends to keep the pipe from coming off horizontally.
To cut it, I used a sawzall. I laid out the cut lines with a chalk line, rachet strapped the pipe to sawhorses and cut the slot. Cleaned up the slot with a grinder until the pipe slid on with a little help from a hammer.

I'm on my second season with this pipe, and will have to flip it around for next season, due to the wear on the bottom. Hope to get 2 more seasons out of it.

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What are you plowing with that pipe over the blade?
Snow on a gravel private road, up to 6 gravel drives with concrete approaches, and parts of my yard. I backdrag the approaches with the exception of my barn. Since the tractor is in the barn, I can drive forward in float, clean, backup, reposition and do another section. It won't clean the concrete 'squeaky clean' but it also doesn't harm the concrete. My 'drive' to the barn is my yard, about 150 feet. I plow that in float and it works well without tearing up the grass. Off that, I also do about another 120 ft to make a path from the barn to the house through the yard, to make a 'circle drive'. The drive of the house itself is about 80 ft of gravel, the road is over 1/4 mile of gravel, and one of my neighbors gravel drive is about 400 ft. Hope that gives you an idea.

PS. I plow everything in float and only use 'non-float' if I encounter a section where I lose steering. That usually only happens if there is ice under the snow.
 
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Thank you for the explanation. Appreciated
:thumbup1gif:
Auguste

Snow on a gravel private road, up to 6 gravel drives with concrete approaches, and parts of my yard. I backdrag the approaches with the exception of my barn. Since the tractor is in the barn, I can drive forward in float, clean, backup, reposition and do another section. It won't clean the concrete 'squeaky clean' but it also doesn't harm the concrete. My 'drive' to the barn is my yard, about 150 feet. I plow that in float and it works well without tearing up the grass. Off that, I also do about another 120 ft to make a path from the barn to the house through the yard, to make a 'circle drive'. The drive of the house itself is about 80 ft of gravel, the road is over 1/4 mile of gravel, and one of my neighbors gravel drive is about 400 ft. Hope that gives you an idea.

PS. I plow everything in float and only use 'non-float' if I encounter a section where I lose steering. That usually only happens if there is ice under the snow.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the suggestions and input.

I am trying a piece of 1" rigid plastic conduit that I forgot I had. It took a lot to hammer it on so I think it will stay. It also seems to 'scrape' pretty well and doesn't scuff the driveway.

We'll see how it goes the next time I have to use it.

Thanks again for all the input guys.

Thumper
 
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Hi All,

What do you use to slit the pipe?
What type of PVC pipe is best?
I am thinking of 2" diameter to increase its ability to scrape snow and leave less behind. Thoughts on diameter? Again, this is a paved driveway.

I have a 6ft rear blade (Tarter from Tractor Supply) that I have been using to scrape my paved driveway. I've thought of installing an UHMW plastic cutting edge to help save the driveway from scuffs and quiet it down when scraping. But I believe this would limit its ability to scrape ice, and I don't plan on swapping out plastic/steel cutting edges on a per storm basis.
So I thought of PVC pipe. Easier to take on/off (I think) than a replacement edge.

Thanks,
Thumper
If you have any concerns about the ability to scrape packed snow and ice from a paved (concrete or asphalt) surface then a pipe blade guard ( ABS, PVC, etc.) is not for you. Your likely to rip or pull off the pipe or break it trying to scrape. These types of covers for the blades are MEANT TO FLOAT over gravel and sod and not disturb rocks or dig into the grass. They skim the surface and leave a layer of snow/ice behind as a sacrifice to avoid digging up the drive or the lawn. They will not clean very well at all.

Now as for you questions-
1-circular saw
2-no PVC is not, lots of folks can get ABS and they like that much better. If you can find it HDPE utility conduit in SRD11 (1/2”) thickness is the best-I’ve used it for years and I cannot hurt the stuff. I use 3” on a gravel drive and to push snow back onto grass.

3-2” might improve your scraping an infinitesimal amount but it’s still going to float, you don’t have enough weight or downforce to cut thru snow and ice with a 2” piece of pipe to do any effective scraping

IMHO you want to scrape and have a paved drive-go UHMW or maybe rubber-skip a round pipe guard.
 
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I gave up on the ABS pipe on my 8ft rear blade. It has never lasted past one clearing of snow. I only use it for clearing gravel as I have no pavement. I went with 16 inch disk blades welded onto my 4 inch skid shoes that leaves about 1 inch of snow, but the blade does not touch the gravel. When using the front bucket, I tilt the bucket enough that it rides on the back of the bucket, but the front edge is raised a little and does not make contact with the ground.

Dave


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I have a front blade, and I use a piece of 2” black iron. I plow no concrete or paved drives. Has worked really well.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
If you have any concerns about the ability to scrape packed snow and ice from a paved (concrete or asphalt) surface then a pipe blade guard ( ABS, PVC, etc.) is not for you. Your likely to rip or pull off the pipe or break it trying to scrape. These types of covers for the blades are MEANT TO FLOAT over gravel and sod and not disturb rocks or dig into the grass. They skim the surface and leave a layer of snow/ice behind as a sacrifice to avoid digging up the drive or the lawn. They will not clean very well at all.

Now as for you questions-
1-circular saw
2-no PVC is not, lots of folks can get ABS and they like that much better. If you can find it HDPE utility conduit in SRD11 (1/2”) thickness is the best-I’ve used it for years and I cannot hurt the stuff. I use 3” on a gravel drive and to push snow back onto grass.

3-2” might improve your scraping an infinitesimal amount but it’s still going to float, you don’t have enough weight or downforce to cut thru snow and ice with a 2” piece of pipe to do any effective scraping

IMHO you want to scrape and have a paved drive-go UHMW or maybe rubber-skip a round pipe guard.
I hear you on all counts.

I plan on removing the pipe, using the high carbon steel cutting edge, when I want to scrape crusty ice.
I was reducing the diameter of the pipe to better scrape snow, when using the pipe.
UHMW edge would be great but not easy on-off like the pipe. And would not scrape ice as well as steel would.

This is an experiment in "having my cake and eating it too". If it pans out, I can scrape hard ice with the steel edge and not scuff (with the pipe edge) when I don't need the steel edge. Taking the pipe off and on should be quick enough that it is worth doing on a per-storm basis.

Thumper
 
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