Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Somehow or the other, the key in my JD 1025R was left in the glow plug position over night... killed the battery. Took battery out and trickle charged it for almost two days until fully charged the battery. I put the battery back in the tractor, connected it up and tractor cranked right up.
My question is did this fiasco hurt the glow plug in any way?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,484 Posts
I would think you just drained the battery. Once the glow plugs cycled, they turned off.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,706 Posts
The glow plugs only run for a few seconds then shut off. At least they're suppose too.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,904 Posts
It shouldn't have hurt the glow plugs but....

The glow plugs are activated via a relay (aka a solenoid). When you turn the key the solenoid activates and that provides power to the glow plugs. But there is a timer on the glow plug side of that solenoid. After about 30 seconds the solenoid drops out and power to the glow plugs stops (that's when you see the light on your dash drop off.) That should protect your glow plugs when something like this happens.

It is possible that the solenoid could be damaged though. The whole time that key was in the "On" position it was providing power to the solenoid. That's why your battery got drained.

If your glow plugs are now working properly then you're probably fine. But keep all of this in mind for the future. If they act up in a month (or year!) then I'd focus on that solenoid as your prime suspect. It is much more likely that any damage would be to the solenoid than the glow plugs themselves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
It shouldn't have hurt the glow plugs but....

The glow plugs are activated via a relay (aka a solenoid). When you turn the key the solenoid activates and that provides power to the glow plugs. But there is a timer on the glow plug side of that solenoid. After about 30 seconds the solenoid drops out and power to the glow plugs stops (that's when you see the light on your dash drop off.) That should protect your glow plugs when something like this happens.

It is possible that the solenoid could be damaged though. The whole time that key was in the "On" position it was providing power to the solenoid. That's why your battery got drained.

If your glow plugs are now working properly then you're probably fine. But keep all of this in mind for the future. If they act up in a month (or year!) then I'd focus on that solenoid as your prime suspect. It is much more likely that any damage would be to the solenoid than the glow plugs themselves.
Thank You So Much!!!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
829 Posts
This is just one of many instances here on GTT where the brilliant members can answer just about anything. :bigthumb:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,951 Posts
It shouldn't have hurt the glow plugs but....

The glow plugs are activated via a relay (aka a solenoid). When you turn the key the solenoid activates and that provides power to the glow plugs. But there is a timer on the glow plug side of that solenoid. After about 30 seconds the solenoid drops out and power to the glow plugs stops (that's when you see the light on your dash drop off.) That should protect your glow plugs when something like this happens.

It is possible that the solenoid could be damaged though. The whole time that key was in the "On" position it was providing power to the solenoid. That's why your battery got drained.

If your glow plugs are now working properly then you're probably fine. But keep all of this in mind for the future. If they act up in a month (or year!) then I'd focus on that solenoid as your prime suspect. It is much more likely that any damage would be to the solenoid than the glow plugs themselves.
JimR ~ I have a followup question related to the above. So when does power to the relay/solenoid cease since the ignition key remains in the same 'on' position during operation? :unknown:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,904 Posts
JimR ~ I have a followup question related to the above. So when does power to the relay/solenoid cease since the ignition key remains in the same 'on' position during operation? :unknown:
I'd have to go back through the tech manual again but my understanding of the system is that once you turn the key to the "Start" position to engage the starter the solenoid gets cut back out. As long as the engine is running it won't kick back in again. That also protects the glow plugs so that they aren't running if you don't wait out the timer and just start the engine.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
987 Posts
Fuel pump?

Doesn't the fuel pump run continuously when the ignition is in the "run" position?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,038 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,706 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
Did you rack up some bonus hours on the hour meter?
The Hobbs is typically tied to the 'R' terminal of the alternator. This terminal is diode protected to prevent battery voltage from showing up here. The idea of the R terminal is when it shows more than X volts (usually 3 volts) certain relays are cut. There should only be power there if the alternator is spinning (engine is running - or a failed diode is allowing voltage from the battery through).

The R terminal is typically tied into things like neutral safety and seat switches to kill power to the starter. If the switches aren't made or the the alternator is pumping out voltage the starter (and other relays) are shut down. This prevents starting when safety switches aren't made as well as preventing the starter from engaging if the engine is already running.

Since there is no ignition system in a diesel you are stuck with a crank/cam sensor or simply testing for voltage from the alternator. Wiring in relays and solenoids using this method is pretty common.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top