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Well we have our first really good snow storm the other day:good2:

Finally I get to really check out my tractor and blower and it was awesome. It was so much fun I ended up snow blowing around my house for a path for my wife to her bird feeders. (to bad she didn't have more):laugh:

With that said we have had four other snow storms that I used the tractor but maybe 4 to 6" each time and no issues.

Now this is my question. This last snowstorm I actually lost front traction. I put it in 4 wheel drive and got out of the problem but it happen again a few times. I would lose traction and start to go backwards with the brake not working :dunno: Is this normal or did I screw up (no surprise)

I do wonder I have a ballast box on the back #400 would this make me to light in the front when going up an incline? That is they only thing I can think of. I decided to then just go from highest part to the lower part and everything was good.

Just wondering if you have a suggestions.

Thanks

PS Another snow is coming next !!!!!:lolol: I love my tractor.:greentractorride:
 

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Well, one of the issues you run into with a snowblower is, when the snowblower is in float position, then there is no weight being cantilevered off the rear wheels and your rear traction should be pretty good. When the snowblower is lifted, this cantilevers weight from the rear tires to the front tires, so then you could lose traction with the rear. Having the tractor in 4 wheel drive will help with this condition.

That said, I always use about 320 lbs. of rear ballast when using my snowblower. I also have my rear tires filled so that adds considerable rear weight, and I use rear chains, although, my driveway is pretty sloped.
 

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I run chains , loaded tires, and 2 sets of wheel weights. I have weights for the 3pt, but seldom use them with the blower.
 

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R3 tires are a hard compound tire and when it cold their rock hard.Traction is tough when the tires are hard compared to a turf or Hdap's.
 
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I would suggest be in 4WD when ever dealing with the white stuff. Then it matters less if you are in float or lifted. These little Mighty Mouse tractors are amazing.
 

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R3 tires are a hard compound tire and when it cold their rock hard.Traction is tough when the tires are hard compared to a turf or Hdap's.
I believe you mean R4s. The R3s are turf tires. It only gets worse as you get older.

This is my first winter blowing snow with the 1025Rs. I don't have chains as was trying to avoid them to prevent marks in the driveway and the pavers. I didn't have any traction issues this winter, but I didn't go down the hill path of pavers to the other side of the house this winter. I have a somewhat narrow area to turn a 90 degree corner, between the house and a brick post column and it is doubtful I could make that tune with the 1025R with a blower attached as I just made it with the 455 and it was also AWS.

However, when blowing into the ditch on the other side of the county road, perpendicular, the 455 would loose traction when trying to backout, with chains. The 1025R ws far less suspectible and not an issue at all with the 4wd enabled. I do have filled rear tires and 16* 42# suitcase on the 3-point, however.
 

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I believe you mean R4s. The R3s are turf tires. It only gets worse as you get older.

This is my first winter blowing snow with the 1025Rs. I don't have chains as was trying to avoid them to prevent marks in the driveway and the pavers. I didn't have any traction issues this winter, but I didn't go down the hill path of pavers to the other side of the house this winter. I have a somewhat narrow area to turn a 90 degree corner, between the house and a brick post column and it is doubtful I could make that tune with the 1025R with a blower attached as I just made it with the 455 and it was also AWS.

However, when blowing into the ditch on the other side of the county road, perpendicular, the 455 would loose traction when trying to backout, with chains. The 1025R ws far less suspectible and not an issue at all with the 4wd enabled. I do have filled rear tires and 16* 42# suitcase on the 3-point, however.
WOW, that's a lot of suitcase weights.
 

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I believe you mean R4s. The R3s are turf tires. It only gets worse as you get older.

This is my first winter blowing snow with the 1025Rs. I don't have chains as was trying to avoid them to prevent marks in the driveway and the pavers. I didn't have any traction issues this winter, but I didn't go down the hill path of pavers to the other side of the house this winter. I have a somewhat narrow area to turn a 90 degree corner, between the house and a brick post column and it is doubtful I could make that tune with the 1025R with a blower attached as I just made it with the 455 and it was also AWS.

However, when blowing into the ditch on the other side of the county road, perpendicular, the 455 would loose traction when trying to backout, with chains. The 1025R ws far less suspectible and not an issue at all with the 4wd enabled. I do have filled rear tires and 16* 42# suitcase on the 3-point, however.

Chains only leave marks on a driveway is when you spin the tires..

As goat704! posted WOW, that's a lot of suitcase weights.

Have to agree .
 
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Chains only leave marks on a driveway is when you spin the tires..

As goat704! posted WOW, that's a lot of suitcase weights.

Have to agree .
Correct on one.

When climbing a grade, sometimes there is a traction loss and the wheels spin, even when you're trying not to. Chains a also leave marks when they're slid, such as when applying the brakes when you've lost traction and are sliding down the incline backwards, or worse yet, sideways.

That number of suitcase weights is within the weight limits of the 3-point.
 
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I believe you mean R4s. The R3s are turf tires. It only gets worse as you get older.
Yes,thank you,small keys don't help either.:lol:
 

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I use chains and don’t feel they hurt pavement. But some people are super fussy about their driveways. Chains don’t do any major damage, they may leave some minor scratches. I don’t have a problem with that. Driveways are meant to be driven on.one has to expect some marks from snow removal when you live in where it snows.

I was at a party last summer they had a fancy colored and stamped concrete driveway. The owner got upset over people turning to sharply and leaving tire marks on his driveway. I had a hard time seeing the marks, but he acted like the driveway was ruined. The freeze and thaw cycle will mess up pavement over time , even if never driven on.
 

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I use chains and don’t feel they hurt pavement. But some people are super fussy about their driveways. Chains don’t do any major damage, they may leave some minor scratches. I don’t have a problem with that. Driveways are meant to be driven on.one has to expect some marks from snow removal when you live in where it snows.

I was at a party last summer they had a fancy colored and stamped concrete driveway. The owner got upset over people turning to sharply and leaving tire marks on his driveway. I had a hard time seeing the marks, but he acted like the driveway was ruined. The freeze and thaw cycle will mess up pavement over time , even if never driven on.
I'm sure he spent a few extra dollars on that driveway. I'd equate it to having a new car, the first scratch is always painful. I am cognizant about turning my wheels on asphalt, while not moving, on a warm summer day, as that will push the asphalt up. While I haven't owned anything that leaked oil or other fluids in sometime, when I did, I would never drive into or park in someone's driveway. Even if they didn't care about their driveway, if someone walked through it, it could be tracked into their home.

In my particular case, I live in the land of econuts. According to their measurements, I was grandfathered over the maximum allowable impervious surfaces at our lake home. I had a path along the east side of the house I had always hoped to maintain grass, but between the shading of the house and the neighbor's trees, foot traffic, and runoff from being on a slope, it was just impossible even after numerous attempts. A concrete sidewalk would have been the simple and best solution, but the econuts said no, as it was additional impervious surface. They finally consented to permeable pavers, which would supposedly allow the runoff to pass through them and percolate into the soil. Not that this was an issue, as this path area is over 175' away from the shoreline. $6000.00 later, this 6' x 48' path was done with these permeable pavers. I could have done it with concrete for less than $1000. As it is on a slope, they do nothing to mitigate runoff, as the majority of the runoff volume simply runs over the top of them.

Anyway, getting back to chains, these permeable pavers are somewhat soft and it doesn't take much to scratch them up. Like your party host, I'm still feeling the pain of the $6000 investment into them, also.
 
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