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I am thinking of putting an underground water tank at the end of my gutter and French drain pipes. my house sits above the out falls but they are at ground level approx. 100 ft from the house. The water just flows out and into the woods. I hate wasting the water and thought about sinking a 350g poly tank and just pump the water out for the garden when needed. Has anyone ever tried doing such an activity? The tank would be about 200 ft from the garden at 0 elevation change. Suggestions welcome .
 

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I would LOVE to do an underground tank! But even before I got the BH I knew that most of this property is ledge rock and where it's not ledge it's broken up ledgerock the builder hid under the topsoil. I'll still be using my 3 55 poly barrels... but, since the house next door is now abandoned I can always pump out of the pool over there.:laugh:

This should prove to be an interesting thread!
 

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I've done a bit of thinking and research about this very subject. I just buried a couple of 125-150 foot 4" lines down the edge of my property. One is connected to my French drains, the other is connected to my downspouts. The downspout connections need more work, they connect up with corrugated, some just laying on top of my grass right now. I have an area I can break into my drain lines to fill a storage tank, I was thinking about 750-1000 gallons.

Things that I found out and need more research to confirm/put into my design. Please don't take this as gospel, it's just what I found out so far and questions that I came up with.
1. Buried poly storage tanks need to be designed for underground use, they must be stronger so they don't collapse when they are empty. I saw a few poly tanks at tractor supply, and on various web sites, these were for above ground use, and state on them "not for underground use". The poly tanks designed for underground use I found online were way more expensive.
2. Burying a poly tank may not be as easy as it seems, I spoke with a construction friend I know, and he gave me some advice. If you have a high water table, or your ditch can hold water/drains slow, the tank may float up, especially if the tank is empty. Burying it deeper, you have the crushing issue. He suggested getting a concrete septic tank for water storage if I want to bury it.
3. You can use an above ground poly tank if you put it on a good platform/footing and not backfill it, but that puts more design/expense/work into the project. And depending on the slope of your yard, you may have to set your "platform" deep enough for gravity to fill it. And if you put it in a "hole" that is not backfilled, is there a safety issue with kids and animals falling in?
4. And some tanks have a large top opening for access/cleanout, will that have to be secured too if it is accessible (can't have inquisitive kids falling in !!!)?

I'm not sure whether my large storage tank idea is going to be economical or not. I already have four 55 gal rainwater drums around my house. Never enough water, and 55 gals is not enough to attach a pump, and carry buckets is getting old really quick.

So I'll be interested in the opinions / info posted here by others too.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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And it's not just smaller poly tanks that can "float" out of the ground. In my old neighborhood a gas station put in a couple new 2K gallon tanks, backfilled and PAVED over them before filling. They wanted to use the area for parking again right away. They both floated up through the pavement when it rained that weekend.

I guess the concrete tank is the safest and easiest way to go in the long run, I know I would not want to spend on a water tank what I spent on my 1K gal double section poly poo tank! It sure would make a fine water tank, but definately could float in the right conditions.

I think I'm heading towards putting all my water storage on the "blind side" of my house. I have one "official" water tank that looks like it's made of wood which I don't mind facing the street, but 2-3 blue polys lend kind of an "industrial look" to the opposite corner (no that I care when the rain quits... but... I am "married" and we all know what that can mean re. "industrial appearing" areas.):laugh:
 

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I thought about doing something similar after we moved into our house until I discovered it was illegal to do so. Since Colorado is a semi-arid state, our Gummint declared many, many years ago that everything that fell from the sky was theirs. I've heard they loosened the law up a bit to allow rainwater collection barrels on gutter downspouts.
 

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I thought about doing something similar after we moved into our house until I discovered it was illegal to do so. Since Colorado is a semi-arid state, our Gummint declared many, many years ago that everything that fell from the sky was theirs. I've heard they loosened the law up a bit to allow rainwater collection barrels on gutter downspouts.
I thought Colorado was bad enough in their rules, regulations and thoughts, years ago. It sounds like they have gotten worse thru the years, not better. How can they claim to own what nature provides? :unknown: No wonder I was only willing to stay there a year! This strong-willed girl doesn't like being told what she can or can't do! :nunu:
 

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This site is full of potable water tanks as well as septic tanks. All plastic and you can bury them. I have a 1500 gallon buried for septic on my outbuildings. When this thing showed up, trust me, you can not collapse it underground! And once it is buried, there is no chance of floating.

Here is a link to a 2500 gallon.


Septic Holding Tanks
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Interesting thoughts. The soil is soft enough to dig the depth needed to sink a tank myself but you all bring up good points with floating and safety. I would do it just behind the house but my wife is against big plastic barrels or tanks showing. I could run my lines another 100 ft and hit a 12 foot drop to set an above ground tank but would then need to pump up hill about 50 feet plus the 200 run to the garden. The difference in price between above ground and underground tank might make up the price in more powerful pump and lines. Either way I hate wasting rainwater. We get big downpours here in PA but might go a week or more before the next rain.
 

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Frost can push the rounded bottom plastic tanks up also.

What happens with all the shingle stone that ends up in the tanks?
 

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Frost can push the rounded bottom plastic tanks up also.

What happens with all the shingle stone that ends up in the tanks?
Naturally it's caught in the shingle stone trap just before the acid nutralizer chamber coupler.:laugh:

My roof's about 7 years old now and seems in the last couple years has not shed very much. I disturb it a little when I clean the chimney but it doesn't amount to enough to worry about in 150 gallons. Keeping the constant supply of maple leaves/seeds and oak leaves and pine needles under control is my problem. But then I'm totally emptying the barrels every Fall so that really isn't that much of a problem either.
 

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I thought Colorado was bad enough in their rules, regulations and thoughts, years ago. It sounds like they have gotten worse thru the years, not better. How can they claim to own what nature provides? :unknown: No wonder I was only willing to stay there a year! This strong-willed girl doesn't like being told what she can or can't do! :nunu:
Sadly Colorado is becoming more like California every day. The Demorrhoid controlled county I unfortunately live in is taxing us for storm water now. A lawsuit has been filed against the county over this illegal tax.

Like you I don't like being told what to do.
 

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I was told sometimes they have to have the delivery truck hold down a concrete tank while it is backfilled, as it may float if the ground is wet enough/high water table.

The frost could only push up a tank if it was set above the frost line. If the bottom of the tank is below frost line(they say 36" inmy area) it shouldn't heave. If the tank were truely round the widest part of the cross section would need to be below the frost line. Most of the plastic type tanks I have seen around here are flat bottomed with a rounded top though.
 

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As I understand it with plastic tanks they should be filled with water prior to backfilling, and the bottom be below frost line.
 

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Above ground pool

At Sam's club two years ago they had big above ground pools. 18 foot around by 4 foot deep. I bought one on sale at the end of the season. I had a 10 yd dump truck of sand delivered and spread it on a nice flat space behind my barn and garage. I ran the downspouts from both buildings into the pool and put the supplied cover on the pool. It fills up with rain water each spring/summer and I add water to it to keep it full. It's a pool to anyones eyes. The nice wooden box next to it contains a pump and lots of fire hose. It paid off last summer when the forest fires came so so close. The first thing that went was the power. I was able to fire up the pump and lay the hoses all over and hook up sprinklers. When Forestry guys came by to evacuate us I had a huge fire line around the house (thanks to my two tractors) and a sprinkler system going. Plenty of MY rainwater to protect the property and they didn't have to use any of our tax dollars to protect it. Even in CO you could probably label it as a fire protection system (saving them valuable tax dollars) I know that requires some logic sad sigh.
We've used that pool for two years now and it waters the lawn and garden with rainwater. So simple and yet it holds 8,000 gallons just in case.
 

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Eventually I am planning on collecting rain water at the house in the so called "pretty" barrels and then moving it back to the back of the property where my gardens are by some means. We have two 60 gallon rain barrels currently and will add probably three to four more in the future. I'll put a 1250-1500 gallon tank in the back above ground. The challenge is getting the water from the house 500+ feet back and 20 feet up. I've looked at pumps, but I would need a high pressure pump to push it that far which costs a good amount of money. There is already a water line under ground that we use, but it's not durable enough to handle the pressure. My latest plan is to transport the water when the rain barrels are full via a 60 gallon tank mounted on a pallet. I would pump the water out of the rain barrels at the house into the tank, then using tractor and pallet forks carry the tank back to the back and then pour the water into the big tank. When I need to water the gardens, I pump the water out of the big tank. If I need to water trees I could use the tank on the pallet.
 

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a ram pump could get the water that far away and uphill, but in this case I think you'll still need a small pump to feed the ram pump.
 

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Rain water storage/use in any form can really be handy. Long before I got a genset that would handle the house water pump I always stored 30gal. or so in buckets all year 'round in the basement everywhere we've lived. Reason: Wife + Power Outage = Happy Flushing! I still like to use rainwater (however "acid" it might be here) for outside watering. I just need to "clean up" my downspout to barrel system, it's pretty.... primitive!:laugh:
 
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