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anyone have one? opinions? what the deal with the engine additive you need to keep it clean? expensive? on all new diesels?

Thanks in advance
 

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A friend just bought one. I was amazed at how quiet it was for a diesel. He says he gets 20mpg highway. I does use DEF (diesel exhaust fluid).
The dealer told him a tank (not sure how big) will last about 10,000 miles. Filler for it is right by the fuel filler, behind the same door.

His listed for approximately $48K, he paid $37K plus tax.
 

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anyone have one? opinions? what the deal with the engine additive you need to keep it clean? expensive? on all new diesels?

Thanks in advance
I can't help on the Dodge but we just bought the wife a new Audi Q7 and it has the diesel and requires the additive. It has the fill spout under the fuel fill as well. I think this is on all new diesel engines
 

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The DEF costs about $10/ 2 1/2 gallons and most trucks I think hold about 2-3 gallons. The DEF usage varies with load, when the easier you are on it the less it will use.

I would hope those 1/2 ton diesels get mid 30mpg, because most newer 1/2 ton gassers get 20-22 mpg on the highway.
 

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There is also a cetane additive which is also required for low sulfur diesels, one bottle is about $9 and is good for 125 gallons. I'm not sure I'd own another diesel truck at this point. Also keep in mind oil changes require much more oil than a gas motor, also make sure you look into the cost of fuel filters. An oil change with oil filter, plus fuel filters will run me about $250 or so... and that's me doing it. DEF in my F350 will last around 8000 miles, the truck will warn me when it gets low.


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A friend just bought one. I was amazed at how quiet it was for a diesel. He says he gets 20mpg highway. I does use DEF (diesel exhaust fluid).
The dealer told him a tank (not sure how big) will last about 10,000 miles. Filler for it is right by the fuel filler, behind the same door.

His listed for approximately $48K, he paid $37K plus tax.
Son got a '14 CTD RAM 2500 4-door 4wd 12-31-14. He got 21-22 mpg on a road trip last January with winterized fuel, cold temps, etc. 20 from the half ton is nothing to brag about. I've heard 25-26 mpg is typical with them.
 

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My 2005 4x2 3500 Cummins gets 21-24 Highway towing (small trailer), 19-21 in town. Yawn-1500.
 

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My boss has the same diesel the Ram does in his Grand Cherokee and he gets 34mpg.


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FWIW......A couple of guys here at work recently picked up 2015 4wd Ext cab F-150's with the new 2.7L Ecoboost. They are AVERAGING 21 mpg so far over a couple months of driving daily.......just as good mileage as the diesel (although probably less tow rating), no need for the added diesel maintenance and lower actual fuel costs.
 

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I've been paying close attention to them, as I think it's about damn time North America got on the same wagon that Europe has been on for decades.

I'm told by the 2 guys I know with them that they love them. Once guy reports 40+MPG (imperial gallon) when he behaves himself, and 20-ish pulling his big pontoon boat.

I'll likely always need a 3/4 or 1 ton, but if I didn't I'd sure be looking at one of these.

-J.
 
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Jer, My 2015, F150, 5.0, 3.73 rear is now getting about 19.5 mpg to and from work, no highway miles. I think the digital read out is a tad off but not any more than .5 MPG. In short at least 19 mpg.
 

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Jer, My 2015, F150, 5.0, 3.73 rear is now getting about 19.5 mpg to and from work, no highway miles. I think the digital read out is a tad off but not any more than .5 MPG. In short at least 19 mpg.
Gas, correct??

-J.
 

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I've been paying close attention to them, as I think it's about damn time North America got on the same wagon that Europe has been on for decades.

I'm told by the 2 guys I know with them that they love them. Once guy reports 40+MPG (imperial gallon) when he behaves himself, and 20-ish pulling his big pontoon boat.

I'll likely always need a 3/4 or 1 ton, but if I didn't I'd sure be looking at one of these.

-J.
The reason the US hasn't gotten on the diesel bandwagon is because in Europe diesel is actually CHEAPER than gasoline AND gets better mileage making it easier for the consumer to justify spending the extra $$$ on a diesel vs gasoline as it will pay off in the long run. Very few people in the US ever realize the monetary benefit of the 20% better mileage of their diesel because the fuel is 30%+ more expensive in the US. (completely ignoring the additional maintenance, fluids, etc. that go into running a diesel.)
 
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The reason the US hasn't gotten on the diesel bandwagon is because in Europe diesel is actually CHEAPER than gasoline AND gets better mileage making it easier for the consumer to justify spending the extra $$$ on a diesel vs gasoline as it will pay off in the long run. Very few people in the US ever realize the monetary benefit of the 20% better mileage of their diesel because the fuel is 30%+ more expensive in the US. (completely ignoring the additional maintenance, fluids, etc. that go into running a diesel.)
I think we also shot ourselves in the foot a few years back when 8 States put a moratorium on new diesel passenger vehicles being sold for a couple of years while the new "clean diesel" stuff was being developed. When States like CA and NY refuse to allow a class of vehicle to be sold like that, the domestic car makers just put any/all plans on hold. Europe allowed new cars to be sold and added clean diesel features each year as time progressed.

By the time diesels became available here again (At least in those 8 States...) a lot of people were very confused about all of the "clean diesel" technology. At the same time, the hybrid gas/electric cars were flooding the market. I think that multi-year "pause" on availability really hurt the advancement of diesels here. I know I wanted to buy a VW TDI back in 2008 or so and was told I'd have to find a way to buy & register it in another State because they weren't available in MA at the time.
 
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There is also a cetane additive which is also required for low sulfur diesels, one bottle is about $9 and is good for 125 gallons. I'm not sure I'd own another diesel truck at this point. Also keep in mind oil changes require much more oil than a gas motor, also make sure you look into the cost of fuel filters. An oil change with oil filter, plus fuel filters will run me about $250 or so... and that's me doing it. DEF in my F350 will last around 8000 miles, the truck will warn me when it gets low.


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No. Cetane improver does not make the diesel more lubricating. That is what is needed. Lubricity which the same stuff they sell on here works for. Cetane increases the the retards the burn rate.
 

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The reason the US hasn't gotten on the diesel bandwagon is because in Europe diesel is actually CHEAPER than gasoline AND gets better mileage making it easier for the consumer to justify spending the extra $$$ on a diesel vs gasoline as it will pay off in the long run. Very few people in the US ever realize the monetary benefit of the 20% better mileage of their diesel because the fuel is 30%+ more expensive in the US. (completely ignoring the additional maintenance, fluids, etc. that go into running a diesel.)
Ummmmm....

Until 2009 diesel was always less money, and I'd argue that 20% better mileage is a conservative estimate. Quality of the diesel is true, I'll give you that.

All this "clean diesel" stuff is BS. Burn twice as much for 1/2 the emissions - great idea.

The lack of quality passenger diesels in NA is a joke. It's a bit better now with the little cobalt diesels, 1/2 tons, and Benz and Audi SUVs.

A diesel Jetta has been, and is still, one of the best values on the road today.

-J.


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Ummmmm....

Until 2009 diesel was always less money, and I'd argue that 20% better mileage is a conservative estimate. Quality of the diesel is true, I'll give you that.
Maybe in Canada, but not in the US...Diesel has been the close to the same or more than gasoline for the last 20 years in the States.

Currently diesel is averaging $3.83/gal and gas $3.36 (14% higher than gasoline)

Historical gas prices (regular)
Weekly U.S. Regular All Formulations Retail Gasoline Prices (Dollars per Gallon)

Historical Diesel prices
U.S. No 2 Diesel Retail Prices (Dollars per Gallon)

Again - that's ignoring the increased maintenance costs of running a diesel (oil changes, fuel additives, etc.)

In Europe diesel has always been cheaper than gas.....and gas runs $4-8/gallon depending on the country

Here's an example from Germany (1 Euro = $1.12 US, 3.79L/gal)
Biodiesel - $1.00 Euro/L = $4.25 USD/gal
Diesel ; $1.14/L = $4.84 USD/gal (14% CHEAPER than gas)
Gas: 1.32/L = $5.60 USD/gal



For those that tow heavy loads or drive serious miles/year it can make sense (diesels last longer, etc.), but for most people - it isn't cheaper over the life of their vehicle to have diesel vs gasoline in the US.....That's why it's still only a single digit % of the US market.

Even the Jetta diesel sells at a fraction of the rates of the regular gasoline version. If it saved people money - they'd do it. But in this country it really doesn't, especially when you can by many cars that get 35-40mpg on regular gas these days.
 

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Diesel was 10-20 cents per litre (40-80 cents per gallon) cheaper here until 2009.


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Even the Jetta diesel sells at a fraction of the rates of the regular gasoline version. If it saved people money - they'd do it. But in this country it really doesn't, especially when you can by many cars that get 35-40mpg on regular gas these days.
What I have found is many people can't hand calculate fuel mileage correctly (miles driven/fuel consumed=mpg). Many want to estimate fuel consumed instead of taking the time to actually take the time to fill up, reset the trip odometer and then fill up again come time for the next tank, and do this over several tanks. Others just cannot comprehend the math and application to the task. Of course some just don't care to figure their fuel economy and will just us the meter which can be horribly inaccurate, my brother's 2013 F150 Crew Cab 4wd ecoboost reports 18 mpg but actual is just a shy better than 14.

When I purchased my Jetta TDI I spent days on Fuelly looking at real world records of real people keeping track of their fuel mileage. What is quickly realized is that gas vehciles underperform when compared to the EPA rating and diesels overperform when compared to the EPA rating. Gas autos that are of similar size, not same class actually feel the same size when test driving, are not getting 35-40 mpg but are more in the 28-33 mpg range (at best) where as the Jetta TDI is in the 38 to 42 mpg range. I then spent days running different scenarios comparing fuel and maintenance costs along with expected fuel economy. It didn't take too long to realize that as long as diesel and gas were within about $.80 a gallon of each other, diesel being higher, I could at least break even. Now gas and diesel are the same price, though that won't last for long.

The one reaction I got from most everyone when I bought my car, but a gallon of diesel cost more. No matter how much talking I did could get them past the per gallon price. They perceive pay less for gas, no matter the mpg, as saving money. So, I have to disagree with you, on the "if it saved people money-theyd do it"

Then of course none of this takes into account the fun factor of driving a diesel. Oh the torque....
 
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