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I Winced at the cost, but ordered a step anyway to help these old bones. Now reading the instructions I find out I’m only half through spending to get my step on. Torque requirement for the loader mount bolts is 223 foot pounds. No problem I thought. I have a 1/2” Craftsman click torque wrench and even the 24mm 6 point socket that fits axle nut on my motorcycle. Getting tools out to installI I found out my wrench is about 75 foot pounds short. My Harbor Freight beam wrench also comes up short. Now I need a new torque wrench.
Good news is it was only a question of time as service schedule is to check torque every 50 hours. Next time I travel off the mountain I’ll buy a third 1/2” torque wrench.
Seems every time I get a new toy I find out I need a bigger tool box.
 

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I don't know if you own a backhoe for your tractor. When I checked the installation manual for the backhoe sub-frame (JD Sub-frame Installation Instructions LVU24088 K0), I learned that the draft nuts at the back of the tractor are supposed to be tightened to 357 lb-ft (485 n-m). Those are very pricey torque wrenches. If you are going to buy another one, you might want to make sure you've covered all the possibilities.

Keane
 

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Holy torquing, that's tight! I kept all my torque wrenches the mill had bought for me when I retired. I thought about giving the big 3/4" drive 600 ft/lbs wrench to one of the new guys but decided to keep it for my grandson. Glad I did.

You can buy torque multipliers for under a hundred bucks (or over $1000!) but for infrequent use one of the cheaper ones will serve you just fine. I know the big torque wrench I have was over $500 so the multiplier tool would be my choice if it wasn't big enough. A torque multiplier is basically just gear reduction device that lets you set the torque wrench at a fraction of the final torque.

Good luck, and don't bust your knuckles. If you lived down the street from me you could borrow my wrench.
 

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I don't know if you own a backhoe for your tractor. When I checked the installation manual for the backhoe sub-frame (JD Sub-frame Installation Instructions LVU24088 K0), I learned that the draft nuts at the back of the tractor are supposed to be tightened to 357 lb-ft (485 n-m). Those are very pricey torque wrenches. If you are going to buy another one, you might want to make sure you've covered all the possibilities.

Keane
Keane, that's a one-time torque requirement on installation, right? Or is there an interval at which they need to be re-torqued on already-installed BH subframes?
 

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I Winced at the cost, but ordered a step anyway to help these old bones. Now reading the instructions I find out I’m only half through spending to get my step on. Torque requirement for the loader mount bolts is 223 foot pounds. No problem I thought. I have a 1/2” Craftsman click torque wrench and even the 24mm 6 point socket that fits axle nut on my motorcycle. Getting tools out to installI I found out my wrench is about 75 foot pounds short. My Harbor Freight beam wrench also comes up short. Now I need a new torque wrench.
Good news is it was only a question of time as service schedule is to check torque every 50 hours. Next time I travel off the mountain I’ll buy a third 1/2” torque wrench.
Seems every time I get a new toy I find out I need a bigger tool box.
I had the same problem when I installed 2 steps, both sides, on my 1025R. My torque wrench was smaller than required, the same as yours. Here is what I did instead of investing in a new torque bar for a one or maybe two time use. I torqued to the highest setting with the tools that I had, then I got out my cheater bar, (a piece of pipe about 3 ft long that slides over my socket handles) and tightened the bolts a little more with enough pressure to get them tighter without stripping the threads. Use your own judgement for that. After getting them tight, I marked the position of the bolt head to the loader frame with a black permanent marker so I could tell visually by only looking to see if they were working loose. After using the loader from then, up to now, there has been no movement of the bolts from the markings. As long as they stay put I am not going to worry if the foot pounds set are correct according to the book.
 

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I torqued to the highest setting with the tools that I had, then I got out my cheater bar, (a piece of pipe about 3 ft long that slides over my socket handles) and tightened the bolts a little more with enough pressure to get them tighter without stripping the threads. After getting them tight, I marked the position of the bolt head to the loader frame with a black permanent marker so I could tell visually by only looking to see if they were working loose. As long as they stay put I am not going to worry if the foot pounds set are correct according to the book.
Exactly what I've done in the past with the same results.
 

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You could even do the math calculating your body weight and length of cheater bar to figure out the torque applied. Or just tighten it up really really tight
This plus you can stand on a bathroom scale and count the pounds reduced when you lift yourself up on the cheater bar and multiply by the number of feet on the bar
 

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Keane, that's a one-time torque requirement on installation, right? Or is there an interval at which they need to be re-torqued on already-installed BH subframes?
I recall reading that the bolts on the sub-frame should be checked for proper torque periodically as part of preventive maintenance for the backhoe. This makes sense to me after riding the "bucking bronco" when digging in really hard soil.

Keane
 
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I recall reading that the bolts on the sub-frame should be checked for proper torque periodically as part of preventive maintenance for the backhoe. This makes sense to me after riding the "bucking bronco" when digging in really hard soil.

Keane
Thank you -- looks like a bigger torque wrench in my future!
 

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A 156lb person standing on the end of an 18” breaker bar will give you 234 lb/ft




Being it’s a loader mount and not a tapered bearing preload you don’t have to be that exact.
 

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I recall reading that the bolts on the sub-frame should be checked for proper torque periodically as part of preventive maintenance for the backhoe. This makes sense to me after riding the "bucking bronco" when digging in really hard soil.

Keane
If the black marker position you put on the 3 bolts on each side hasn't changed, the torque hasn't changed either.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The link to the calculator might be easier. Enter the torque and your weight, and it will tell you the length of wrench to use.
1. put a level on wrench to make sure it is horizontal
2. make sure your weight is centered at the correct distance
3. most importantly don’t fall off and hurt yourself

My agenda is to put a step on to help these OLD bones. Thinking about number 3 I think I’ll spring for the torque wrench.
 

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Also, when using the stand-on-the-wrench method you should have your phone nearby with 9-1 punched in so all you have to do is type a 1 to call for help. You need to make sure the phone is placed near where you are going to fall. This applies mainly to us older guys. The youngsters don't need to worry so much.
 

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I looked at installing my BOH step as a reason and justification for buying more tools 🤑

I parlayed it into another impact socket, two breaker bars, and another torque wrench.

The breaker bars, both 36 inch, didn’t budge the bolts, and neither did my 20V Dewalt 1/2 inch impact wrench. My older corded Dewalt impact finally did the job.

Actually I was kinda disappointed, as I was thinking about a big air compressor and an air impact purchase.
 

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every time I get a new toy I find out I need a bigger tool box.
That accurately describes what happens when you buy a tractor too. It just leads to buying more.
 
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