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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

Need some guidance. Need some ideas on what to do.

I seem to remember that I was able to raise the rear blade on my 4310 much higher than I seem to be able to do it now. Can someone tell me which parts of the rear of my 4310 would actually help to increase the height I am able to get out of my 4310. I keep thinking the "top link" is my problem, but not sure what adjustment I need to do to it to get more height for my rear blade.

Any one with ideas or suggestions, I'd appreciate your help.

FredSG
 

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Hello,

Need some guidance. Need some ideas on what to do.

I seem to remember that I was able to raise the rear blade on my 4310 much higher than I seem to be able to do it now. Can someone tell me which parts of the rear of my 4310 would actually help to increase the height I am able to get out of my 4310. I keep thinking the "top link" is my problem, but not sure what adjustment I need to do to it to get more height for my rear blade.

Any one with ideas or suggestions, I'd appreciate your help.

FredSG
Simply shorten your top link. Problem solved. This will, however, change the angle of your blade.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
How do I shorten the top link? Do I need to disconnect it from the blade altogether? When you write shorten the top link which way do I turn it . . . I've fiddled with it with no real change. Right now the outside tube is screwed down to the very bottom of the top link or that section closest to the body of the tractor.

FredSG

Simply shorten your top link. Problem solved. This will, however, change the angle of your blade.
 

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How do I shorten the top link? Do I need to disconnect it from the blade altogether? When you write shorten the top link which way do I turn it . . . I've fiddled with it with no real change. Right now the outside tube is screwed down to the very bottom of the top link or that section closest to the body of the tractor.
Can you post a picture?

Normally, you loosen the jam nuts and turn the main section one way to lengthen and the other way to shorten. Each end has reverse threads so as you turn the main section it will thread-out or thread-in the outer eye-sections.

If your top-link is shortened all the way until your two eyelets touch the main body and it is still too long, you may need to get a shorter top-link.

 

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Your manually adjustable top link consists of 3 pieces. 2 externally (males) threaded end links, and 1 internally (female) threaded center section.
That female 'tube' should thread onto both male top link ends at the same time/rate, so that they turn in or out equally. So shortening the top link will have both male ends, tractor side and attachment side, threaded all the way into the 'tube' as far as they can possibly go. By doing so, your top link has become shorter, you have shortened the top link. To fully extend the top link, you turn that center piece (or tube as you called it), the opposite direction and watch both ends extend out from the tube, that would be extending your top link, or lengthening your top link. You can do this while the blade is attached to the machine.
If you do this while it is not attached, you need to hold both male ends stationary as you turn the center section, so they remain equal to each other, in regards to how much they thread in or out of the female center section.

And you can adjuste anywhere in between fully extended or fully collapsed (shortened), for what ever angle you may need.
 

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Also, some machines have 2 or 3 holes on their lifting links where they attach to the lower arms. not all have these but some do. If yours has more than 1 hole, you can change to a different hole and this will also allow the blade to raise more or raise less depending on which hole position it started in.
 
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If it lifted higher before but now it does not you may be using a different hole in your top link on the tractor. Changing the pin location the top link hooks into if you have 3 holes to work with will change how far a rear blade will come up. What it does is changes the geometry of the adjustable link as it goes up and down. So try a different hole and lift it up and down. Each time you use a different hole you will need to twist the link to reset the angle of the blade. On my 4044M one hole will lift high but once the blade lifts it angles more as it raises. One hole will keep the blade level as it comes up but not go as high. I will post a picture of the hole I use for this height. If I use the wrong one I have a hard time getting my blade off the ground very high and the snow won't have room to get out from under the blade. 100_2675.JPG this is how high my rear blade lifts using the bottom hole. 100_1620.JPG
 

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So when I use my rear blade I want it to go high as it can to get rid of the dirt and be able to lift it up high and hook on to a lot of dirt in a pile and use the lower hole. Using my Box Blade I want the bottom to stay level as it comes up and use the top hole. I hope this is making sense? On the bottom hole it pulls back on the top of the blade more as it comes up. If I was using the top hole it would just work like a hinge and not pull back as it comes up. So now that we have that explained when your turn your adjustment in and out you change the angle of the cutting edge when sitting on the ground. That way you can make a real aggressive cut to dig in good or one that slides over the material more and does not dig in. If you don't want to tear up the place plowing snow adjust the top of the blade forward more but it won't cut into the hard pack as good. All these little adjustments you will learn over time working with different materials and reasons for what your doing.
 

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Also, some machines have 2 or 3 holes on their lifting links where they attach to the lower arms. not all have these but some do. If yours has more than 1 hole, you can change to a different hole and this will also allow the blade to raise more or raise less depending on which hole position it started in.
According to JD Parts the 4310 does have three positions for the top-link.

 

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According to JD Parts the 4310 does have three positions for the top-link.

Alright, while those aren't specifically what i was talking about, they do have an effect on lifting height and aggressiveness of the angle.
What i was speaking of was the lifting link arms that connect the upper rock shafts down to the lower 3pt arms. Some machines have 2 or 3 holes in the lower section of these links.
 

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That really only changes the angle of the implement when sitting on the ground reasons. Like if your box blade is not flat when grading. Works just like a regular top link on the 3 point. You can use it to lift higher but your blade will not work right when down. Some 3 points have the top point further and closer to the tractor and this lets you set that part to hinge right. liftinglink.jpeg.jpg To work the 3 point to the best use you need 2 adjustment points.
 

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That really only changes the angle of the implement when sitting on the ground reasons. Like if your box blade is not flat when grading. Works just like a regular top link on the 3 point. You can use it to lift higher but your blade will not work right when down. Some 3 points have the top point further and closer to the tractor and this lets you set that part to hinge right. View attachment 669758 To work the 3 point to the best use you need 2 adjustment points.
They effect it when lifted too. I'm not trying to show the threaded adjustment portion of the lifting link, but rather the 3 holes you see in the long slotted area that fits over the lower 3pt arm (labeled D,C and B). Those 3 holes effect how low or how high an implement sits in relation to the ground. Both links on either side of the 3pt would have those 3 holes, if the machine has them. Adjusting the lower arms in those 3 holes has an effect on overall implement height and overall implement depth. They are for up down adjustment, not left right like the single threaded link would be.


Edit, here's a pic of some i had on my old Kubota....Notice how each link has 3 holes that i can move the lower 3pt arms up or down in?
 

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They effect it when lifted too. I'm not trying to show the threaded adjustment portion of the lifting link, but rather the 3 holes you see in the long slotted area that fits over the lower 3pt arm (labeled D,C and B). Those 3 holes effect how low or how high an implement sits in relation to the ground. Both links on either side of the 3pt would have those 3 holes, if the machine has them. Adjusting the lower arms in those 3 holes has an effect on overall implement height and overall implement depth. They are for up down adjustment, not left right like the single threaded link would be.


Edit, here's a pic of some i had on my old Kubota....Notice how each link has 3 holes that i can move the lower 3pt arms up or down in?
OK I see now, yes used that way they lift the lower drag links with the upper lift arms but that would be more for changing the angle of the blade for crowning or ditching lifting one side or the other of the rear blade. If they were adjusted wrong you may not be able to lift as high. I liked the older tractors you could just reach back and change one from the seat to angle the rear blade. On my 4044M you have to get off and go around and twist them by hand and keep resetting the blade to do it as it gets to hard to twist them. When I saw that picture I thought it was just a different type of top link now I see why the one end was different. One side on my 4044M has grips to grab and twist and the other side you have to remove it off the upper lift arm to adjust it when you turn it. I was thinking of buying one more with the handles so it was easier to cut with the ends of my blade on both sides with out pulling it apart. Then I could go up on one end and down on the other much faster doing this for a steeper angle to cut drainage ditches on the side of our dirt road. Like on your tractor they both have bars to grab and do this.
 

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Alright, while those aren't specifically what i was talking about, they do have an effect on lifting height and aggressiveness of the angle.
What i was speaking of was the lifting link arms that connect the upper rock shafts down to the lower 3pt arms. Some machines have 2 or 3 holes in the lower section of these links.
I see what you mean. Unfortunately the 4310 that the OP has does not have multiple mounting holes on the lift arms.

 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thank you all for your comments. Thought I'd post a photo of the rear of my 4310. Right now I have the Top Link in the middle hole, so I will drop it down to the bottom hole. What about the top link itself? What should I do with it? Does it need to be rotated . . . is it too short, or too long in its present appearance?



Thanks again for all the ideas and information . . . very much appreciated.

FredSG
 

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Thank you all for your comments. Thought I'd post a photo of the rear of my 4310. Right now I have the Top Link in the middle hole, so I will drop it down to the bottom hole. What about the top link itself? What should I do with it? Does it need to be rotated . . . is it too short, or too long in its present appearance?



Thanks again for all the ideas and information . . . very much appreciated.

FredSG
Put it in the bottom hole first with the blade still on the ground, then adjust the top link by turning one way or the other till the cutting edge leans back a little kind of like shaving your face do that with the edge to get a good cut the way you like on the snow. But just putting the adjustable top link in the bottom hole alone when you raise it you will see how much further it comes up. The adjustable link is just for setting the angle of the blade when down once up it does not matter the blade is off the ground. The lower 2 arms is what lifts the blade and the top link sets the angle of the blade for cutting into the ground. If you make the top link adjustment to long the blade will keep falling over backwards. Use the top link to pull or push the blade on the cutting angle you like. If you pull it to far forward your lower arms will keep going down till they stop. I am having a hard time typing how to do this. So just put it in the bottom hole on the tractor and you will see what you need to adjust to plow snow the best. Then you will understand what I am saying. You don't want the 2 lower drag links pointing down so when you pull it they come up. You want them pretty level when hooked to the blades lower 2 points. Pretend the blade will set the way it is now and adjust the link till you can put it between the 2 places it hooks to it will be real close to being right. Block up the blade so you don't have it fall forward when you take out the adjustable top link. I have a leg that hold mine. Once hooked up I raise the blade and fold the leg up. If you don't have a leg you pull the tractor back and forth till you can get that top link in place to adjust. I will go out and take a picture what it should look like way clearer to see this.
 

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Thank you all for your comments. Thought I'd post a photo of the rear of my 4310. Right now I have the Top Link in the middle hole, so I will drop it down to the bottom hole. What about the top link itself? What should I do with it? Does it need to be rotated . . . is it too short, or too long in its present appearance?



Thanks again for all the ideas and information . . . very much appreciated.

FredSG
Fred,

You need to disconect your implement from the top link and screw the long end in until it has approximately the same number of threads showing as the other end of the link. Your top link is short on the end that is attached to the rock shaft and long on the other end. They need to be equal.
 

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Thank you all for your comments. Thought I'd post a photo of the rear of my 4310. Right now I have the Top Link in the middle hole, so I will drop it down to the bottom hole. What about the top link itself? What should I do with it? Does it need to be rotated . . . is it too short, or too long in its present appearance?



Thanks again for all the ideas and information . . . very much appreciated.

FredSG
It appears to be a bit too long and also a bit out of adjustment. Ideally you want the ends of the threaded eyelets to be screwed in the same amount. What is happening is you are bottoming out on the inner eyelet while the outer eyelet has a lot of exposed threads. You should be able to pull the top link pin at the implement, lift clear the top link, screw the body out some, screw the eyelet in most of the way and then turn the top-link body to readjust.

That should restore most of your top-link adjustment.

 

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Here you go and yes center your top link threads once you do that they go in and out at each end when you adjust it.

Here are the pictures you want the blade to look close to this angle. 100_2880.JPG

and the 3 point hook ups close to this picture. 100_2881.JPG

when it is adjusted it should look close to like this. 100_2879.JPG

If you got it right the blade will lift up like this one High. 100_2878.JPG If you look at the 3 holes see how if the top one was used it would push the blade back and lower it.
 

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Fred,

You need to disconect your implement from the top link and screw the long end in until it has approximately the same number of threads showing as the other end of the link. Your top link is short on the end that is attached to the rock shaft and long on the other end. They need to be equal.
Just looking at your rust mark you can see it was in the bottom hole before. Now if your upper link bars are like mine you need to raise them all the way up to get them out of the way to put the pin in the lower hole. Be careful when you unhook the rear blade block it up, adjust the top link till it just gets loose and the weight is sitting on the blocks, remove it and move the pin down. Then adjust it out or in till you can hook it into the blade side. Raise the blade off the blocks and re/adjust it till the angle is like this on the cutting part. 100_2880.JPG When done you will kick yourself seeing how easy it was to do.
 
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